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Seven things to know about Surrey LRT

Excitement is building for the Surrey–Newton–Guildford Light Rail Transit project—we can feel it!

The Surrey LRT is the proposed rapid transit project to connect the City of Surrey’s City Centre, Guildford and Newton communities. It’s the first phase of the South of Fraser Rapid Transit projects!

With the roll-out of Phase One of the 10-Year Vision, Surrey LRT project planning and public engagement is on track (pun intended). The project’s business case was recently submitted to the provincial government and TransLink’s now waiting for word from the Provincial government regarding approvals, funding and timelines.

Once we do, we’ll have so much more to share with you. In the meantime, with excitement building, the Buzzer blog would like to share seven things you should know about the proposed Surrey LRT project!

 

  • LRT provides reliable travel – LRT is a new form of rapid transit in Metro Vancouver, ideal for connecting and shaping growing suburban communities. With service at street-level within a dedicated right-of-way and signal priority at intersections, LRT bypasses congestion and provides customers with consistent and reliable travel times.

 

  • LRT is popular – Surrey is on the same path as major North American cities like Portland, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Toronto, Ottawa, Mississauga and Waterloo where successful urban-style LRT projects are operating or under construction. There are more than 400 systems operating in about 50 countries and more than 200 cities around the world, moving millions each day!

 

  • A good fit – Research shows light rail transit is the right solution for Surrey’s busy transportation corridor. LRT will help encourage new and sustainable residential, commercial and business developments, better manage traffic congestion in Surrey’s urban core and enable a more pedestrian-friendly and connected community.

 

  • Will serve long-term demand – Surrey is anticipated to grow by more than 250,000 people by 2041. LRT provides the flexibility to grow both in terms of capacity and network coverage over the long-term that is unmatched by bus rapid transit (BRT).

 

  • Good support for LRT from locals – According to a third-party survey of residents this past spring, local support for LRT is clear: 72 per cent of Surrey residents and 82 per cent of residents in surrounding areas support the project proposed. Additionally, 82 per cent of transit users and 58 per cent of Surrey residents say they are likely to use LRT.

 

  • Good support for LRT from businesses – City Council in Surrey, as well as the Mayors’ Council and the Surrey Board of Trade are proponents of the project. The majority of developers who will be responsible for building supporting mixed-use communities around LRT stops and stations are also supportive.

 

  • A first in BC – Once built and in operation, the Surrey LRT will be the first light rail transit system in British Columbia! Transit customers across Metro Vancouver will have the option to travel by bus, SeaBus, light rail transit, SkyTrain, West Coast Express and HandyDART.

 

Want to learn more about the Surrey LRT project? Please visit surreylightrail.ca

 


36 Comments

  • By Ben Kennedy, December 18, 2017 @ 1:26 pm

    The choice of terminology is unfortunate. “At-grade rail” would make more sense. Skytrain and Canada Line are also both LRT, insofar as “light rail transit” meaning “intended for light loads and fast movement”.

  • By Michael, December 18, 2017 @ 8:43 pm

    What is this poll you speak of that 72% of Surrey residents support LRT? A poll on the Surrey Now-Leader newspaper website had over 80% of respondents choosing SkyTrain over light rail for Surrey. And with reliable travel? How will accidents involving trains be handled? If one train is stuck on the tracks due to an accident, all of the others behind it must stop as well. Hawthorne Park is going to have a road built through it, as well as the field of Hjorth Road Elementary. Of course City Council would support this project. When you have a council made up of just one party, it makes a lot of sense that they will agree on almost everything. Light rail won’t make it easier to travel around Surrey and Metro Vancouver. It will make it more difficult.

  • By Gurmeet S Cheema, December 18, 2017 @ 9:55 pm

    I agree that a large majority of residents support SkyTrain. We are not sure how that poll was conducted which shows 72% support for LRT. This ground level rail project is being pushed against the wishes of majority of Surrey residents. It will be a big failure if completed. It needs to be stopped now. Surrey needs a transit system that rapidly transport people from one point to other without disrupting other traffic on the roads. High speed is need of todays world. Street level Train does opposite to that. There are many lies and vague statements in this blog. I hope that John Horgan and his Government will look into this manipulative job done by Surrey Mayor and the city council and will not approve funding for LRT. Political courage is needed to stop the erratic projects and to bring the right fit projects. SkyTrain project for Surrey Langley should be started as soon as possible. Thanks.

  • By Paul, December 18, 2017 @ 9:05 pm

    While the Buzzer blog is unable to contain their “excitement”, perhaps they should re-read their printed issue from April 20, 1955. Because the progress since then is now going full-circle rubber to rails backwards!

    http://buzzer.translink.ca/2017/04/from-rails-to-rubber-a-look-back-at-the-regions-transition-from-streetcars-to-buses/

    Today marks the 62nd year since the last streetcar ride in Vancouver! We’re definitely a bus region nowadays whether they be conventional diesel, hybrids or trolleybuses, but it wasn’t always that way.

    Metro Vancouver used to have interurban rail and urban streetcars connecting and moving the Lower Mainland until April 24, 1955 when we said goodbye to Vancouver streetcars with a fitting send-off at the PNE.

    To know where you are, is to know where you’ve been. So, let’s take a quick look at the major milestones that transitioned our region from rails to rubber!

  • By Mike, December 18, 2017 @ 9:21 pm

    1. It’s garbage and no-one wants it.
    2. It’s garbage and no-one wants it.
    3. It’s garbage and no-one wants it.
    4. It’s garbage and no-one wants it.
    5. It’s garbage and no-one wants it.
    6. It’s garbage and no-one wants it.
    7. It’s garbage and no-one wants it.

    This is just a propapanda piece.

    No-one wants the high density this LRT will bring in Surrey when the rest of the Lower Mainland is suffering from it.

    Also, City hall is on 104 – surely they see the implications with the current traffic along 104? What a disaster. I swear this is covering something up for the upcoming electoral year.

  • By John, December 18, 2017 @ 10:19 pm

    I don’t support LRT in Surrey. The whole idea of rail rapid transit is speed up transit and/or meet capacity needs.

    At grade LRT will have zero time savings over buses, so benefit there.

    There is no capacity constraint buses; there are far fewer than running along Broadway in Vancouver. As for traffic, on King George or 104 Ave; the only capacity constraint issue with traffic is due to the loss of two lanes of traffic from the existing 4 lanes of 104 Ave proposed by LRT.

  • By Bryce, December 18, 2017 @ 11:17 pm

    There needs to be an investigation into misleading information

  • By Behrad Sadoughian, December 19, 2017 @ 10:29 am

    Surrey residents favor SkyTrain over LRT. You try to ignore them. You don’t give residents any chance to raise their voice.

    What lies beneath?

    Maybe a place for Anti-corruption investigation. :(

  • By Eugene Wong, December 19, 2017 @ 11:19 am

    I knew that this blog post seemed scummy. I just didn’t want to say anything at first, since I thought that I would be the only person complaining.

    * no cited sources

    * being the first in BC makes this even worse

    * people are casually walking in front of and behind the trains

    * no effort is given to contrasting the demand for LRT with the demand to get rid of it

    * businesses don’t want to give up street parking for a train that comes by every 10 minutes

    * LRT is less reliable than SkyTrain, because unionized drivers will strike; SkyTrain can continue to run during a strike

    Allen works for the dark side.

  • By Eugene Wong, December 19, 2017 @ 11:22 am

    We need to push for the Broadway extension, so that there will be no money left for LRT.

    I think that Translink has been ordered to never admit that LRT can’t handle traffic jams. They just refuse to admit it.

  • By Alfred, December 19, 2017 @ 12:47 pm

    Not the right fit for Surrey.
    Langley needs to be connected before Newton.

  • By Annie Kaps, December 19, 2017 @ 8:36 pm

    I THINK THAT COUNCILLOR WOODS SPOKE FOR THE WHOLE COUNCIL’S “F E A R-O F-F A I L U R E” AND WHAT COUNCIL HAD TO DO TO ACHIEVE THEIR GOAL:
    (1) City abused Surrey citizens’ Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
    (assembly: when they called RCMP to plaza)
    (speech: when they turned off mics at a summer concert)
    (speech: when they forbad collecting THEIR 6-page electoral response forms on civic property)
    (right to an assent vote, aka referendum—most gravely—-the right to cast a vote:
    “……….I do not support putting this matter to a referendum. It would in my opinion fail – just like the former referendum on transit……” Regards…. Dave Woods, City of Surrey, Councillor.

    (2) City denied a democratic open forum: The Save Hawthorne Park group had asked that City of Surrey staff provide a town-hall-style Q & A session at this December 6th open house at Riverdale School. Such a forum would have levelled the paying field as it would have allowed for:
    a natural flow of fielded questions as one triggers another
    everyone hears the query and the City staff’s response

    (3) City did NOT follow provincial guidelines, per Province of B.C. Governance #206746: “An AAP is intended to be a “litmus test” to help a local government determine whether or not to go ahead with an assent vote (often referred to as a referendum).”

    2018 CIVIC ELECTIONS “………In reference what you can do to stop this initiative – frankly there is an City election occurring in October 2018. The obvious would be to support candidates who have different points of view than the current council…….” Regards…. Dave Woods, City of Surrey, Councillor.

  • By yvrlutyens, December 20, 2017 @ 1:53 am

    What on earth is this bumf? “Excitement is building … we can feel it!” There only seems to be about 10 people who support this dog, and I doubt “excitement” is truly the mood. “Doubt” and “concern” are more likely. The Surrey LRT plan is terrible, as demonstrated by the Translink study, and there hasn’t been anything lately to change anyone’s mind. Are there even 10 people that support this? I have spoken to Surrey engineering staff, and while they dutifully recited their lines, they did so with zero conviction. They seem to know what we all know, this is bad transit and bad urban design. Only the mayor and a few counsellors are truly on board with this thing.

    “LRT provides reliable travel” – less so than Skytrain.

    “LRT is popular” – but way less popular than fully grade separated metro systems like Skytrain which are the dominant form of urban rapid transit in the world. And among those North American cities that took the LRT path is regret that they didn’t bury in the central area, viz Portland and Calgary.

    “A good fit – Research shows light rail transit is the right solution for Surrey’s busy transportation corridor” – this is exactly the opposite of the truth. The translink study demonstrated that LRT was the worst option. And the fiction about creating “a more pedestrian-friendly and connected community” is totally unproven. Streets with LRT that are pedestrian friendly were pedestrian friendly long before the LRT. There is no causation.

    “Will serve long-term demand” – but not as well as Skytrain.

    “Good support for LRT from locals” – but people prefer Skytrain. Was this survey a comparison between the LRT and Skytrain plans?

    “Good support for LRT from businesses” – business supports transit, not specifically LRT.

    “A first in BC – Once built and in operation, the Surrey LRT will be the first light rail transit system in British Columbia!” – So what!

  • By Robert Willis - Buzzer Editor, December 20, 2017 @ 10:39 am

    Hi all. It’s great to see such conviction about rapid transit in Surrey! As noted, we’re still waiting for direction from the province on the business case. Once that happens we’ll have a lot more info to share that will likely answer a lot of your questions. We know this is a passionate for the buzzer community and we too are passionate about it at TransLink. Let’s make sure that our passions don’t get the best of us and refrain from name calling. This blog isn’t the place for that.

    In the mean time, I’ll try to respond with what we know now.

    Ben: Yes, LRT is a term that encompassed numerous modes of rapid transit. I’ve hear of GroundTrain before, but LRT seems to be the one that has stuck thus far.

    Michael/Gurmeet/Behrad/yvrlutyens/Eugene: All of you referenced the survey mentioned, so we’ve got some info on that for you. To ensure we heard the opinions of a broad range of voices, the project team went to the experts at the research firm – Insights West – to conduct an independent and statistically-valid poll earlier this year. The results are based on a representative sample of 602 residents in Surrey as well as 303 residents in nearby municipalities (including the City and Township of Langley, Delta, and White Rock). The polling had a margin of error of +/- 4 percentage points for the Surrey results, and of +/- 5.6 percentage points for the neighbouring municipalities.

    Paul: Yes, we love that issue of the Buzzer! I too am a fan of the old street cars. And yes, I see the irony in proposing rail where it once was. However, times have changed and situations are different. Not to be confused with the classic streetcar of yore, the modern forms of street-level LRT are once again transforming cities around the world. Check out this video from our summer consultation for some real-world examples of the features of modern LRT: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfTDT8UMBIA Thanks for plugging that issue of the Buzzer!

    Traffic Impacts

    Surrey LRT will travel in its own dedicated lanes, which offers increased reliability because it won’t be held up by congestion or accidents in the other lanes. At intersections, new traffic signals and other design elements will ensure that traffic flows smoothly and safely – one of our top concerns!

    Here’s some info about a few topics a bunch of you raised:

    Accidents

    In the event of an accident that does block the LRT lanes, operational staff and emergency responders will work to clear the site safely and quickly so that service can continue. And if an LRT vehicle does break down or otherwise can’t continue, there will be spaces along the route where LRT vehicles can cross over to the other lane and pass – similar to how SkyTrain single-tracking works when there’s a stalled train.

    No faster than the bus

    We’ll have updated numbers to share once the province approves the business case, but previous traffic modelling work indicated that by the time 2045 rolls around, riding the LRT from Newton to Guildford would be 10 to 15 minutes faster than when compared to the 2045 “taking-the-bus-in-a-world-without-LRT-but-with-forecasted-increases-in-traffic-congestion” scenario.

    Have a great day everyone!

  • By Jeremy, December 20, 2017 @ 10:48 am

    I’m still not convinced that LRT is right. How about SFU Surrey students living in the Tri-Cities currently find that driving across the Port Mann is faster than taking 3 SkyTrains from Coquitlam Central to Surrey Central via Lougheed Town Centre and Columbia. Might as well improve and extend the 96 B Line to Coquitlam Central at least.

  • By Marvin B, December 20, 2017 @ 1:54 pm

    I’m not convinced this is a good project at all. This is no faster than a bus with a dedicated lane. And even if one argues that it’s 10 minutes faster, I still say that’s not enough to warrant the expense. Does anyone remember the fast ferries? How much money was wasted in an effort to get to Vancouver Island 15 minutes sooner??? I think the smarter move is to build SkyTrain to Langley and bus lanes for 104 Ave and King George Blvd in Surrey. Those buses will be packed when people can bypass traffic and connect to Langley via SkyTrain. I know I’m not alone. LRT is a major boondoggle waiting to happen. The politicians are more concerned with their legacy than doing what is right. Mayor Hepner wants her ribbon cutting picture with a train, not a bus lane. That’s really what this is all about.

  • By Ben Kennedy, December 20, 2017 @ 3:00 pm

    What was the intended purpose of this blog posting? It seems like a marketing piece called for by proponents of this at-grade rail project. Is that accurate?

    Regarding the survey: 602 residents is not a particularly huge sample size, and while I’m no statistician, I do know that stating a margin of error (± 4%) is incomplete without stating a probability (n times out of m).

    And I’ll point out again that the statement “ the Surrey LRT will be the first light rail transit system in British Columbia” is patently false. SkyTrain and Canada Line are very obvious and well-known light rail transit systems. And as others have pointed out, whether or not one is the first to exist is not in and of itself a meaningful quality.

  • By yvrlutyens, December 20, 2017 @ 3:31 pm

    Can we please see what the survey question was?

    Regarding bus times, the LRT will be no faster than a BRT system.

  • By Steve, December 20, 2017 @ 3:53 pm

    Wow, not a single comment in support of LRT.

    Regarding the poll, I’m assuming the question was something along the lines of “do you support LRT” rather than “do you support LRT over alternative options A, B, C, etc.”

    LRT in Surrey will not work an we’ll be paying for it for generations to come.

  • By yvrlutyens, December 20, 2017 @ 6:18 pm

    A note on the terminology. Skytrain has been referred to as ALRT, but that stands for Alternative Light Rapid Transit. Not Light Rail Transit. In modern parlance, LRT refers to at-grade rail partially segregated from other street traffic to achieve higher speeds than a tram. As fully grade separated and automated metro systems, Skytrain and the Canada Line are not LRT. Regarding the boast in the original post, it’s still probably wrong. The Interurban Line and the Steveston line would count today as LRT if they still existed.

  • By bardak, December 20, 2017 @ 7:46 pm

    There are some major questions have not been answered. What are the travel time savings compared to the 96 B-line in both absolute and percentages? What are the ridership projections compared to the status quo. What is the question that was asked in the survey? It is a bit unethical to use a survey to promote something without letting people know what the context of the survey.

  • By ???, December 20, 2017 @ 8:38 pm

    It’s been discussed…. Surrey wants an affordable at grade LRT service to service more riders across a larger area. Surrey resident do not believe in extending an expensive grade separated system that would serve a single corridor like Vancouver, Burnaby or Richmond.

  • By Mark, December 20, 2017 @ 11:13 pm

    This entire piece reeks of marketing. No one. Wants. At grade LRT.
    It’s cheaping out and will screw us long term. This is a terrible decision and didn’t Translink even write a report showing how it wasn’t the best option.

    But seriously. Who cares if it’s popular if it doesn’t work. Portland LRT is garbage. It’s constantly late and is always stuck in traffic.

  • By James, December 21, 2017 @ 1:25 am

    Obviously, there has been no consideration towards SkyTrain instead of LRT. The powers that be, including TransLink, the provincial government, and the City of Surrey are dedicated to shoving LRT down our throats and our streets, creating MORE congestion and introducing hazardous conditions. This behaviour is irresponsible and shows a distinct lack of concern of the citizenry under their purview. There needs to be a proper study commissioned showing the pros and cons of SkyTrain – further described as advanced rapid transit (ART), LRT and the existing BRT system in use today.

    Claim 1: LRT provides reliable travel – LRT is a “new” form of rapid transit in Metro Vancouver (if you conveniently forget about the streetcars of the mid-20th century, the Downtown Historic Railway tourist attraction and its successor, the Olympic Line around False Creek), ideal for connecting and shaping growing suburban communities (which a case could be made that the corridor selected for LRT is not growing, having been developed prior to the conception of the Surrey LRT project… with that many people already demanding service, and even more coming in both there and further east, does the demand already exceed capacity, as LRT carries fewer people per hour than ART on average). With service at street-level within a dedicated right-of-way and signal priority at intersections, LRT bypasses congestion and provides customers with consistent and reliable travel times provided no accidents at street-level occur, or people find their way onto the tracks, or the overhead power system comes down).

    Claim 2: LRT is popular – Surrey is on the same path as major North American cities like Portland, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Toronto, Ottawa, Mississauga and Waterloo where successful urban-style LRT projects are operating or under construction (so the ones under construction have already been deemed to be a success, have they? I guess we’d better label this one a success too before we even start construction). There are more than 400 systems operating in about 50 countries and more than 200 cities around the world, moving millions each day (something about lemmings and jumping off a cliff, or something about an appeal to popularity…)!

    Claim 3: A good fit – Research shows light rail transit is the right solution for Surrey’s busy transportation corridor ([citation needed]). LRT will help encourage new and sustainable residential, commercial and business developments, better manage traffic congestion in Surrey’s urban core and enable a more pedestrian-friendly and connected community (ART however, will make Surrey an apocalyptic wasteland, and drive everyone into the loving arms of Mission, Abbotsford and Chilliwack. There are no benefits to ART at all, stop asking).

    Claim 4: Will serve long-term demand – Surrey is anticipated to grow by more than 250,000 people by 2041 (everywhere else is anticipated to remain stagnant). LRT provides the flexibility to grow both in terms of capacity and network coverage over the long-term that is unmatched by bus rapid transit (BRT) [flexibility to grow is a good thing, seeing the lack of foresight that was the Canada Line, but of course this means that there will be more service needed on the line, meaning more interruptions in traffic, meaning more congestion…].

    Claim 5: Good support for LRT from locals – According to a third-party survey of residents this past spring, local support for LRT is clear: 72 per cent of Surrey residents and 82 per cent of residents in surrounding areas support the project proposed ([citation needed]). Additionally, 82 per cent of transit users and 58 per cent of Surrey residents say they are likely to use LRT (since what TransLink will do is decrease service along those corridors, and truncate bus routes to the LRT station in the name of efficiency, all of the people surveyed will likely not have much of a choice in the matter).

    Claim 6: Good support for LRT from businesses – City Council in Surrey, as well as the Mayors’ Council and the Surrey Board of Trade are proponents of the project (for obvious reasons… Surrey City Council will be able to add it onto their re-election posters, TransLink will have yet another thing to manage making a couple managers less redundant until they can hire more, and the Board of Trade will see it as a way to grow their customer base). The majority of developers who will be responsible for building supporting mixed-use communities around LRT stops and stations are also supportive (because it makes property values and thus their profits go up. Are they kicking in?).

    Claim 7: A first in BC – Once built and in operation, the Surrey LRT will be the first light rail transit system in British Columbia (again, don’t mention the Olympic Line, guys, shhh)! Transit customers across Metro Vancouver will have the option to travel by bus, SeaBus, light rail transit, SkyTrain, West Coast Express and HandyDART (this is kind of a stupid statement that only marketing professionals could come up with, since no one is going to take LRT on trips between Richmond and North Vancouver, or Burnaby and Maple Ridge… how does that make it a genuine “option”?).

    In summation, ‘we’re doing it because we want it, not because it’s best for everyone’. Swell, thanks.

  • By Allen Tung, December 28, 2017 @ 11:18 am

    Hi James, the decision to move forward with LRT in Surrey is not one that was entered into lightly, or without consideration of various options and technologies. Planning for rapid transit South of the Fraser dates back to 1993, and more recently the Mayors’ Council engaged in five years of planning and consultation before determining that street-running LRT is the most suitable option for this corridor.

  • By Ben Kennedy, December 21, 2017 @ 1:07 pm

    @yvrlutyens: Your “common parlance” is at odds with my perception of “common parlance” regarding terminology. By example of a current project, Ottawa is in the final stages of building a grade-separated train system that is pervasively described as LRT (“light rail transit”).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederation_Line
    http://www.ligneconfederationline.ca

  • By David, December 21, 2017 @ 1:21 pm

    I get what Surrey is trying to do with the LRT. That is their thinking is “if we build it” high density multi-use development will follow. This is actually not quite true. It isn’t the LRT that is attracting development, it is the City’s commitment and investment in the public spaces, and infrastructure to move people. Rail lines are fixed, do everybody knows that the train will be there for a long time. Bus lines are less fixed and can be moved. And usually the infrastructure investment for bus lines is just not there.

    If you look at the rendering of the street scape – about 90 per cent of it is public space improvements to make it walking friendly, close to frequent transit. The transit does not matter so no long as the city is invested in providing the transit – it could be a rapid bus line in dedicated lanes, LRT, underground subway station or elevation SkyTrain. The technology does not matter.

    If the goal of the city is to develop the higher mixed use walkable community built around transit – it will work. But if the goal is to have rapid and fast transit across the region, this is not the way to go. The trains will be slower as they need to cross at grade, deal with pedestrians. It looks quaint, but when you’re on that train and it’s crawling, it is not a great experience.

    It’ll be interesting to see the results of the business case and a lot of that depends on the goals and objectives for this project.

  • By Allen Tung, December 28, 2017 @ 11:19 am

    David – Thank you for your thoughtful comments. It’s true that a different rapid transit technology would also likely attract development and that the City’s investment in improving public space plays a key role. But based on Surrey’s long-term development plans and the Mayors’ Council Vision for transportation in this area, LRT was chosen as the best option to shape the corridor into transit-oriented communities with sustainable mixed-use development and walkable neighbourhoods.

  • By yvrlutyens, December 21, 2017 @ 2:10 pm

    I think that the Wikipedia entry gives the answer: “While using light rail vehicles and technology, the Confederation Line is completely grade separated with high frequency service and so falls towards the light metro end of the spectrum.”

  • By Eugene Wong, December 21, 2017 @ 7:33 pm

    Here a few of the questions, I bet.

    “Currently, you can drive from Guildford Mall to 72 Ave & King George in 30 minutes. The city of Surrey wants to save transit riders 15 minutes. Which is better for you?”

    “There is absolutely nothing that anybody could ever ever do make the rapid bus system better. Imagine that you have had a difficult day at work, and imagine that it is raining heavily on a windy Dec. night. If Translink sent out a long warm train with lots of seats available, then would you get on board now, or wait until a crowded bus comes?”

    “Now pretend that you own a business on a street near the proposed LRT route. Knowing that construction would cause many of your competitors to close down, would you oppose that construction?”

    “If all modes of transportation were free to build, then would you be opposed to LRT?”

    “Are you able to list 157 absolutely distinct reasons for why LRT is bad for all of the GVRD? Yes or no.”

    “Okay. List them all.”

  • By Franklin Elle, January 3, 2018 @ 6:39 pm

    love all the comments. show me your credentials almost all have no experience in urban development or economics so many Canadian cities are using LRT and not skytrain Dela Cruz is merely a pawn and cannot defend errors on website vancouverites getting too many services as per population of provincial tax payers surrey has already made the case for travel and commerce within surrey if Langley wants Skytrain next project phase provide funding on SkyTrain for Langley

  • By Jay Annon, January 8, 2018 @ 10:39 pm

    Business and City officials must continue on with LRT plans similar to transportation projects across Canada and the US. Increase density along KG corridor to sustain the ridership. Mobility within Surrey for Surrey along with ground level businesses employment and eyes on the street for safety will change the habits of motorists to adopt transit. Just wished the NDP would jump in and show leadership by extending the LRT to the South Surrey Park and Ride. Parking at Newton (triple the population of Guilford) would be an issue not to mention the extra congestion to get to there from the concentration of town homes (64 ave. to Highway 10 and KG to 152 ave). It’s apparent that Massey tunnel decisions can be done quickly so step up and move the LRT startup instead of more delays and extending deadlines.

  • By Kuldip Pelia, January 24, 2018 @ 6:40 pm

    No Good survey
    They asked 600 residents about LRT in Surrey. But as you can see under Weighted Sample Characteristics,76% of the respondents use Drive/carpool as their mode of transportation. So the sample was useless as it included only 19% transit users.

    Another point to note is that the survey questions were all about LRT. There was no mention of Skytrain or LRT vs Skytrain. As you know, the main issue for rapid transit in Surrey is Skytrain Vs LRT.

    So the survey is absolutely irrelevant and misleading.

    It was a complete wastage of taxpayers’ money.

  • By Kuldip Pelia, January 24, 2018 @ 7:45 pm

    LRT is a Proven DISASTER
    LRT causes accidents resulting in death, destruction of property, traffic delays, street closures, and congestion
    See what happened in Calgary, Edmonton, Seattle, Portland, Minneapolis, and Houston-the cities with LRT. Just Google the headlines.
    • Destroyed in Seconds Houston Metro Rail- YouTube video
    • Don’t let idiots build your transit- Global News video
    • Pedestrian killed by CTrain was 43rd accidental death on LRT system
    • Platt: Train pains continue to vex transit riders on a daily … – Calgary Sun
    • Drivers could be stuck at LRT crossing for up to 16 minutes: Metro LRT ..
    • Man dies when hit by MAX train in East Portland; service disrupted …
    • Portland Streetcar collisions? Nearly 1 a week, reports say …
    http://www.debunkingportland.com/printables/MAX_Kills.pdf
    • Person struck, killed by light rail train in Seattle | Q13 FOX News
    • Metro LRT Line experienced 11 service delays in November
    • LRT shut down after crash with cyclist – Edmonton – CBC News
    • Link light-rail service halted by car crash in Rainier Valley | The Seattle ..
    • Crash closes light rail tracks, busy road for hours | KIRO-TV
    • Seattle Light Rail Hazard Analysis Shows High Collision Potential and …
    • Light Rail Increasingly Dangerous | The Antiplanner
    • Light Rail Train « WCCO | CBS Minnesota – CBS Local
    • Twin Cities light-rail tragedies raise safety alarms – Twin Cities

  • By Mira, January 26, 2018 @ 8:19 am

    Hello think it might be time to protest, why does everybody get skytrain in the Lower Maniland and not people in Surrey and Langley.

  • By Jordan, January 26, 2018 @ 3:45 pm

    Because Surrey is a much less dense city. And the cost per boarded passenger is much higher. That’s why the LRT L-line should be BRT not LRT (nor SkyTrain).

    If you’re meaning SkyTrain to Langley that makes more sense, but still Vancouver is strangled by congestion and overcrowded busses. It makes much more sense to invest in rapid transit there.

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