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Translink Buzzer Blog

Category: Buses

Say hello to the world’s first long-range battery E-bus!

BYD (Build your Dreams) is an all-electric bus manufacturers in North America, Europe and Asia.

They loaned CMBC a beautiful, brand new 40’ LFS electric bus to demo at a number of our depots and office locations this week.

Today, it was right here at Sapperton – TransLink’s HQ!

So, I took it upon myself to wonder down and have a look.

Some features of these buses:

  • Environmentally friendly, non-toxic, BYD Iron-Phosphate Battery powered. In fact, this battery at full charge will allow for about 250 km of driving and the battery lasts for 4000 charges meaning one battery can last a bus 1,000,000 kms!
  • Because it is 100% electric, there are zero emissions
  • Energy recovery and battery recharging through optimal regenerative braking which reduces brake component wear
  • Highly efficient and powerful AC in-wheel hub motors provide instant torque to perform in all driving conditions
  • Bi-directional AC charging allows full charging from 0-100% within four hours and the bus can be used as a mobile generator

Take a look at this beauty!

For more specs and information on this bus, check out this brochure.

Author: Adrienne Coling

TransLink prepares for stormy weather

Storms, they are a-brewin’!

As always, TransLink’s top priority is to ensure the safety of our customers and employees. So, in preparation for the inclement weather set to hit our region over the next few days, we are taking a number of steps.

Our Emergency Management group is participating in Emergency Management BC and Environment Canada conference calls to stay apprised of the forecast and expected outcomes as well as communicating within the organization to ensure necessary preparations are made.


Tree branches falling into our trolley overhead wires can be an issue during high-wind conditions, so we are checking known risk locations to prepare.

We also sometimes face road debris, which can result in detours for our bus service. Transit Supervisors and other support staff out on the road, such as Transit Security, in order to proactively identify such problem areas and communicate them out. Once identified, we can react quickly by contacting the municipality responsible for clearing the trees or debris.


In case of high winds, SkyTrain service over the SkyBridge between New Westminster and Surrey may operate at reduced speeds.

If wind speeds exceed 100 kph, service could be temporarily suspended.

We’ve also proactively reached out to construction projects adjacent to SkyTrain to ensure items are properly secured, to prevent anything being blown onto the tracks.

Here’s what you can do to prepare yourself:

  • Sign up for Transit Alerts so we can let you know if there are any service issues or changes
  • Follow our fabulous Customer Information team @TransLink on Twitter or phone 604-953-3333.
  • Plan ahead with our Trip Planner and give yourself extra time on your commute
  • Be aware! More people than usual tend to take transit during nasty weather – common transit courtesy applies even more on days like these!
  • Be visible! A bus operator has a lot to be aware of in AND outside of the bus. Make yourself visible to them! Wear bright, reflective clothing and stand close to the bus stop poll.
  • Be patient! Traffic lights may not be working properly that could cause detours for buses, same goes for debris on routes.

We will continue to monitor the weather and get the word out to all customers if there are any service impacts. Until then, stay safe, stay dry and happy transiting!

Author: Adrienne Coling

Consultation begins for Phase One of the 10-Year Vision for Metro Vancouver Transit and Transportation

TransLink and the Mayors’ Council are looking to the future to meet the challenges of growth and congestion in our region.

Last month, the council agreed upon a proposed plan and presented Phase One of their 10-Year Vision to the public.

Now it’s your turn to weigh in!

From October 11 to 31, 2016, TransLink is inviting Metro Vancouver residents to provide feedback on the approximately $2 billion plan that would increase transit services and improve roads, cycling, and walking infrastructure across the entire region.

Phase One details

  • Increase bus service by 10% across the region, starting in early 2017, including five new B-Line express routes
  • Purchase 50 new SkyTrain cars for the Expo, Millennium and Canada Lines, plus five new West Coast Express cars and a new SeaBus
  • Increase SkyTrain service in early 2017, by providing more service during mid-day and early evening hours
  • Improve the region’s major road network
  • Improve and expand walking and cycling infrastructure across the region;
  • Improve access to transit stations and stops
  • Continue planning and design work for the Broadway subway and Surrey light rail
  • Continue investing in system maintenance and performance.

The Phase One Plan would be paid for through a fair and balanced funding formula – leveraging an initial federal contribution of $370 Million, a provincial government contribution of $246 Million and a regional contribution of $1.3 Billion.

The regional funding would be raised through a number of existing and new sources including modest increases to transit fares and Metro Vancouver residential and business property taxes.

There are a number of ways for you to get involved including online at or by attending one of five scheduled Open Houses.

Open House schedule

  • Saturday, October 15, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    (North Vancouver City Library, 120 14th St W, North Vancouver)
  • Tuesday, October 18, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
    (Act Art Centre Lobby, 11944 Haney Pl, Maple Ridge )
  • Wednesday, October 19, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
    (Collingwood Neighbourhood House, 5288 Joyce St, Vancouver)
  • Thursday, October 20, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
    (Chuck Bailey Recreation Centre, 13458 107A Ave, Surrey)
  • Monday, October 24, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
    (Kwantlen Polytechnic University, 8771 Lansdowne Rd, Richmond)

You can also send an email with your thoughts and suggestions to

After the public consultation period and consideration by TransLink’s Board of Directors and the Mayors’ Council in November 2016, if the Phase One Plan is approved, region-wide transit system improvements will begin in early 2017.

Author: Jennifer Morland

Holiday service for Thanksgiving


Gobble, gobble, friends!

Thanksgiving is almost upon us and that means holiday service for the transit network on October 10, 2016.

Thanksgiving Monday transit:

  • BusSkyTrain, and SeaBus services will operate on a Sunday/holiday schedule.
  • West Coast Express and TrainBus service will not operate.
  • Holiday fares are in effect meaning you only need a one-zone fare to travel across the region!

Please note that the Compass Customer Service Centre and Lost Property Office will be closed.

Regular weekday schedules for all modes return on Tuesday, October 11, 2016.

Plot your transit course with our handy dandy Trip Planner,
tweet your questions to @TransLink on Twitter
and always know before you go with Transit Alerts!

Author: Adrienne Coling

Get your shopping shoes on! Hop on the 609 to the new Tsawwassen Mills mall

Want to check out the new outlet mall in Tsawwassen? We’ve made changes to the 609 to get you there!

Starting Monday, October 3, the 609 Tsawwassen First Nation/South Delta Exchange will now reroute via Canoe Pass Way, Salish Sea Drive, and continue on Highway 17 to Tsawwassen Drive to provide direct access to Tsawwassen Mills.

Be sure to visit ahead of the mall opening to plan your trip. There are a number of stops to get you close to the mall, with a short walk to the mall entrance.

Travel tip: Travelling to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal? Continue to take the 620 – an express route for ferry passengers.

Know before you go!
Find your next two buses by texting the bus stop number and bus route to 33333,
Tweet us or visit Trip Planner.

Author: Jessica Hewitt

My day with Mika: Understanding accessible transit


Mika waiting for the bus on Main St.

This past spring I had the immense pleasure of tagging along on a filming request on our system and spent the afternoon with Kaz and Mika who wanted to showcase the accessibility of our system for a Japanese audience.

Kaz owns Motion Pla-net Productions that often produces work for NHK, Japan’s National public broadcasting organization.

Mika is a lovely woman who lives in downtown Vancouver and takes transit all the time in her fabulous pink wheelchair.

We spent the afternoon riding the bus and SkyTrain while Mika explained in Japanese to the camera all of the fittings and equipment TransLink offers on the system for those who need it.

Part of the filming also included speaking with TransLink’s Access Transit Coordinator, Sarah Chung about why TransLink has been so proactive in promoting the accessibility of transit services for people with disabilities.

“Public transit should be a safe and convenient way to travel, which means our infrastructure, policy and customer service are all impacted by accessibility. There are a number of different needs among our customers that we try to balance so we have to make sure the solutions we provide are sustainable and won’t hinder other people.

One of our key challenges is finding solutions that strike a balance between the diverse range of needs. We need to be financially responsible to the taxpayer as well, and have to prioritize our initiatives. Other challenges happen with the nature of the region, such as the geography making it difficult to make all bus stops wheelchair accessible.”

Mika says that the greatest strength of the system is that people with disabilities have choice.

“I know I can travel on bus, on SkyTrain, on the water on SeaBus and I will be able to get on there myself and be safe. Also being able to get to the airport without calling a taxi is great!”

I learned a lot travelling through the eyes of someone who faces accessibility challenges in her daily life.

On each part of our transit trip, I thought about space on buses, location of elevators, fare box heights, even something as simple as getting on and off a transit vehicle while others are trying to do the same.

These are things as an able-bodied person, I admit, I sometimes take for granted. Perhaps we all do. But it’s important to see through the eyes of others to really understand the world beyond ourselves.

As for the future, Sarah Chung says as an organization, TransLink is constantly growing and adapting our system to meet the needs of our customers.

“We are always looking at improvements to make the system as inclusive as possible. For example, we have a high percentage of wheelchair accessible bus stops, and have introduced a pilot project to make bus stops more accessible for people who are blind or partially sighted. The pilot includes tactile information panels and tactile walking surfaces to help people identify stop information and locations. As a region, we have recently transitioned to a contactless smart card payment system and are continue to work with partners to develop solutions for customers who have limited or no arm mobility.”

Have a look at some pictures from our day together.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Kids ride free on buses for iWALK, October 3–7, 2016

Screen Shot 2016-09-28 at 10.05.17 AMFACT! The majority of school-aged children and youth in our country are not getting enough physical activity to meet the current Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines.

“Children and youth aged 5 to 17 spent an average of 8 hours and 27 minutes, or nearly two-thirds of their waking hours, being sedentary each day.”

Directly measured physical activity of children and youth (2012, 2013)
Statistics Canada

That is why it’s so important to encourage active transportation from a young age!logo

iWALK (International Walk to School Week) is one week out of a month-long, global event that celebrates active transportation, gets kids AND parents out of cars and introduces communities to safe routes for kids to take to school.

To support this fantastic initiative, TransLink is offering free bus travel for students in kindergarten through to grade 12 on any and all bus routes from October 3 to October 7.

Free travel will not include SkyTrain, SeaBus or West Coast Express this year.

Put your walking shoes on and get trip ready with our Trip Planner, use Next Bus or reach out to our Customer Information team on Twitter or by phone at 604-953-3333.

Please note: Regular fares apply to adults accompanying children and youth on buses.

Talk to your school or visit the iWALK website for more information.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Investing in Metro Vancouver’s transit future: The 10-Year Vision

10 Year Vision

In Metro Vancouver today there is overcrowding on the transit network, increased traffic congestion and another one million people moving here over the next 25 years.

It’s pretty clear that our transportation network needs new investment and we need it now.

That is why our local mayors created a 10-year Vision and today, the Mayor’s Council released some more information about Phase One of this vision.

This plan sets out the new services and infrastructure needs of our region now and down the road.

Phase One of the 10-Year Vision is funded through regional funding sources to match investments by the provincial and federal governments.

Phase One details:

  • Increase bus service by 10% across the region, starting in early 2017, including five new B-Line express routes
  • Purchase 50 new SkyTrain cars for the Expo, Millennium and Canada Lines, plus five new West Coast Express cars and a new SeaBus
  • Increase SkyTrain service in early 2017, by providing more service during mid-day and early evening hours
  • Improve the region’s major road network
  • Improve and expand walking and cycling infrastructure across the region;
  • Improve access to transit stations and stops
  • Continue planning and design work for the Broadway subway and Surrey light rail
  • Continue investing in system maintenance and performance.

The Phase One plan includes regional funding sources so that, if approved, we can begin rolling out new services and projects in the Vision starting in January 2017.

The goal is to reduce traffic and make transit commutes faster and more comfortable for all riders in communities across the region.

The public will get a chance to weigh in on the plan during public consultation that will take place in October.

Next Steps:

September 2016: 10-Year Vision: Phase One plan introduced

October 11–31, 2016: Public consultation on the Phase One plan

November 2016: Mayors’ Council and TransLink Board approve final plan

January 2017: Transit system improvements begin

Watch our FB LIVE stream of the press conference with Vancouver Mayor Robertson, Surrey Mayor Hepner and TransLink CEO, Kevin Desmond.

Want more information?
More details can be found in the 10-Year Vision and the press release.

Author: Adrienne Coling

The Transit Service Performance Review results are in!

Report cover - graphic

Today, we released the findings of the 2015 Transit System Performance Review (TSPR), a comprehensive review of ridership and service productivity for bus, SeaBus, SkyTrain and West Coast Express.

FYI: This is the first year the review has expanded beyond bus!

The TSPR gives us valuable information on boardings, ridership, transit trends and more. By monitoring services and ridership, we can respond to changing demands with available resources.

“The Transit Service Performance Review demonstrates how we are actively monitoring the transit system across Metro Vancouver to improve our performance. We know where we need to reduce overcrowding, improve travel speed and respond to changing customer demands,” said TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond. “The 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision sets out a blue print to tackle these needs and with sustainable investment, we can take action.” 

Increasing Ridership

We had record ridership across the system in 2015 with 364 million boardings – that’s our highest ever!

Boardings remained high despite decreased per-capita service hours and slower bus speeds.

The annual review shows that ridership across the system continues to grow:

  • Total system-wide boardings increased 2.1 per cent and total bus boardings increased 2.8 per cent, year-over-year. SkyTrain passenger volumes at Canada, Expo and Millennium line stations have also increased by up to 28 per cent.
  • West Coast Express and SeaBus ridership remains steady. In 2015 there were 6.1 million recorded boardings on SeaBus; if it were a bus route, it would rank tenth highest in annual boardings!

Other trends identified during the 2015 Transit Service Performance Review include:

  • Bus boardings in all sub-regions continue to grow or remain stable
  • Some bus routes have consecutive years of growth in boardings, contrary to system-wide trend
  • Almost half of bus revenue hours with chronic overcrowding occur outside weekday peak periods
  • SkyTrain passenger volumes continue to increase
  • Weekend passenger volumes on SkyTrain are similar to weekday volumes outside of peak periods

What happens next?

Knowing how our transit system performs helps to ensure that we are responding to changing customer demand with available resources and lays the foundation for future investment. The data from the TSPR shows us the need for transit investment in our region is high.

Transit ridership across the system continues to grow despite decreased service hours and service speed. The 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision sets out a blue print to tackle these needs and with sustainable investment we can take action. We are currently developing the 10-year Investment Plan which supports the 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision.

Based on the findings from the review, we’ve strategically allocated available resources to improve the experience for our customers:

  • 15,000 revenue service hours were reallocated from bus routes with low demand to routes where customers need them most
  • Service frequencies were increased to reduce overcrowding on a number of routes, including the 49, 100 and C23 in Vancouver; C28 in the Northeast Sector; 335 and 351 in the South of Fraser; and 403 and 410 in Richmond.
  • Improvements were also made to the NightBus network to provide extended service hours and increased frequency.

Did you know?

Thirty per cent of trips on the system involve a multi-modal transfer (almost all are bus to SkyTrain transfers).

SkyTrain ridership at individual stations has grown by up to 28 per cent. The stations where ridership is growing the fastest are Canada Line stations that have experienced significant redevelopment, including:

  • Olympic Village (driven by new, mixed-used development)
  • Templeton (driven by new, McArthur Glen outlet mall)
  • Marine Gateway (driven by new, mixed-use development adjacent to the station)

Want to learn more? You can read the full report here.

Author: Jessica Hewitt

Hamilton Transit Centre opens in Richmond!

I Love Transit 2016

Today is an exciting day for TransLink, Coast Mountain Bus Company and transit users across the region!

The brand new Hamilton Transit Centre (HTC) is open and will start operations on September 5, 2016.

Transit centres are the hubs of transit systems. They keep buses on the roads to get passengers where they need to go.

Hamilton Transit Centre has capacity for 300 forty-foot buses, including up to 80 community shuttle buses and 150 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fuelled buses.

HTC will perform three functions: dispatch, fuel and wash service as well as maintenance for buses servicing the Richmond, New Westminster, Burnaby and Vancouver areas.

Watch the video above where Joe Peschisolido, Member of Parliament for StevestonRichmond East, the Hon. Peter Fassbender, Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development and Minister Responsible for TransLink, Al Richmond, UBCM president, TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond, and Councillor Harold Steves, Acting Mayor of Richmond celebrated the opening in Richmond today.

Author: Adrienne Coling

I Love Transit: Spokesmama Guest Post – Camping via Transit

I Love Transit 2016

On the bus in Nanaimo

To help celebrate I love transit week, Lisa – also known as Spokesmama, is guest posting and sharing with us how her and her family use transit on their weekend adventures!

This summer we tried something new to us: camping by transit. We don’t own a car, so we generally rent or use Modo car co-op vehicles, or bike to camp. We heard that Newcastle Island was a great destination, and quickly realized that transit was the best way for us to get there. Taking the bus meant carrying nearly everything on our backs except for a small cart that held our cooler and some of the heavier items; planning what we’d bring was a fun challenge.

If you haven’t heard of it before, Newcastle Island sits in the waters a stone’s throw from Nanaimo—almost literally. The entire island is a provincial park, about the size of Stanley Park, with campsites at the south end near the small private ferry that runs from downtown Nanaimo.

Our journey started off with a 15-minute bus ride on the #19 to downtown Vancouver at 9am. We then walked a couple of blocks to the #257 Horseshoe Bay Express. We could have ridden the #19 bus all the way to Stanley Park and transferred at the same stop on Georgia near Denman, but here’s a pro tip for you: on long weekends the #257 bus gets quite full, so if you have luggage and/or children, it’s much better to get on at the very first stop on Dunsmuir at Hamilton.

We arrived in Horseshoe Bay with plenty of time to catch the 10:40am ferry to Nanaimo. Our children spent some time in the Kids Zone, on the tiny play structures in it and watching some TV. Once we’d caffeinated a little, we headed outside for the best part of ferry travel: walking around on the outside decks. The kids loved leaning into the wind and looking for sea animals. We also came across a Bluegrass quartet playing on the solarium on the top deck.

Once the ferry arrived in Departure Bay around 12:30pm, we caught the bus to Maffeo Sutton Park; a ten minute ride. The kids had a play break while one parent headed a few blocks away for the last few items of food and drink that we wanted for our trip, including a few bottles from the newish craft brewery just a block from the park, called White Sails.

After purchasing the last of our supplies, we packed up all our stuff and boarded the ferry to the island. The boat is a stout little craft, holding about 20-30 people, luggage and the occasional bicycle. The crossing is only a few minutes. We stopped on Protection Island first, (where there’s another pub, by the way).

The walk from the dock to the Newcastle Island camp site is only a few hundred metres. All 18 camp sites are reservable online, however, unlike many BC provincial campgrounds, Newcastle was not booked up months in advance. We reserved our site about two weeks before our trip and noticed a spot or two still available a week before.

Newcastle Island is really lovely to camp on—but unlike most provincial parks, you can’t drive there—it’s water access only—so you really feel like you’ve gotten away from the city. The island is very family friendly with lots to do. We explored three beaches, which was only a few of them. There are a number of wide, well-maintained trails looping through and around the island. There are way finding maps at each trail junction, but note that they don’t include a few recent trail closures. There are also a few interesting ruins of former canneries, salteries, and quarries to poke around, most of which include signage with historical information.

From leaving our house in the morning to arriving at the camp site took under five hours, not including the shopping/park play time in Nanaimo. It’s a very affordable way to travel–$130 for a family of four to take six buses, two ferries, and two boat rides. We really enjoyed our trip and I highly recommend taking transit to camp on Newcastle Island.

If you’d like to read more tips for car free camping, please visit Spokesmama.

I Love Transit: The journey from bus fan to transit operator


Chris and his trusty steed, a 2008 Orion V Suburban

Chris and his trusty steed, a 2008 Orion V Suburban

The words “I love transit” mean a lot to Chris Cassidy.

His foray into the transit world was years ago. His grandfather drove a bus for BC Hydro back in the day and as he grew up, Chris became fascinated with buses and bus routes.

Chris’ passion for transit soon brought him two great friends with similar interests who decided to take and collect thousands of amazing photographs of buses!

That was then when he was a teenage transit fan and this is now. Now, Chris is a bus operator!

Read on about his journey from enthusiast to operator!


My name is Chris Cassidy and I’m a transit operator with Coast Mountain Bus Company. Some of you may know me from and a I’m a huge transit enthusiast!

The interest with transit started when I was quite young. My grandfather used to be an operator, hired back in the BC Hydro days and retired a few years ago with CMBC.

I remember riding around on my grandfathers bus going through White Rock in the early 2000’s. He always got one of the brand new, New Flyer low floors. I liked keeping track of all the different runs we’d do, and watching the world pass by us from the big windows.

Cherry blossoms? Check. Big yellow bus? Check.

Cherry blossoms? Check. Big yellow bus? Check.

A few years after my grandfather retired I came across a local message board, the primary topic? Vancouver transit. At first I thought it was a bit strange, but I joined anyways to see what it was about. Not long after that, I picked up a camera and started making my own little trips around the system.

Through these little adventures I’d end up meeting two of my best friends and fellow bus nerds, David Lam and George Prior. Over the following years I tracked down, rode and documented hundreds of buses across Vancouver. Riding all the new routes, riding routes being replaced (like the 98 B-Line) and exploring this city.

The beautiful farm fields of Delta. Taken while I was heading back to the depot after a PM trip through Tsawwassen

The beautiful farm fields of Delta. Taken while I was heading back to the depot after a PM trip through Tsawwassen

During these travels I became close friends with a few operators. I was a young teen, trying to figure out what I wanted to do with my life and doing ride-alongs with the operators was a good time filler. A routine was developed with one operator who turned out to be my neighbour.

After class was dismissed, I’d run home, drop off my bag, grab my camera and run over to his house. From there we’d drive to the depot, take a bus out for the afternoon rush and complete a few trips. Once we did our trips, we’d take the bus back to the depot and I’d get a ride home. It was my daily routine and really pushed me into the seat. After a few months of this routine it finally dawned on me, I HAD to get behind the wheel!

After high school I worked a few customer service jobs, got my full class 5 license and kept myself out of trouble. To be honest, the thought of driving a full sized 40′ bus through downtown seemed a bit overwhelming and I planned to apply for community shuttle first. But, all those operators that I knew, told me to go big and apply for conventional. So, I did… and I got called in for the video test on a crisp November day.


Posing the bus at the perfect angle for photos before leaving the depot, a daily routine for me.

It’s been just over a year since I finished training and I’ve enjoyed everyday as much as I can. Some expected my passion for transit to diminish but, if anything, it’s only grown! Driving has opened up a whole new technical side to things that I haven’t experienced before. You learn all the neat quirks of each bus, how some have a certain shake at a certain speed, or how some have faster lifts. It can get quite geeky when you get down to the minor details, like horns, but I love it.

I drove in Vancouver for 7 months before I was transferred out to Richmond, a mecca for bus nerds. There are the old low floors, the Orion highway coaches and, of course, the big diesel articulated buses. It was love at first sight with me and the Orion highway buses so, I’ve tried to drive them as much as possible. There’s nothing quite like an early evening cruise down highway 99, watching the sun set over the fields in Delta, while behind the wheel of an Orion V. Just the thought of it makes me smile.

Starting Labour Day, I’m off on another new adventure. I’ll be transferring out of Richmond, and into the Burnaby depot. This gives me a chance to drive the famous 99 B-Line, the ever popular runs to SFU and everything on the North Shore. I’ll miss Richmond quite a bit, but a new challenge is good. Plus, I’ll get to knock off some routes that I’ve never driven before, or ever rode for that matter!


Overall, I’m a transportation geek. So, when I had a chance to get a photo of my coach for the day with a train in the background, I had to use it!

While I’m still quite young and I’m not sure if I’ll keep driving for the rest of my career, I know I’ll never leave transit. What started as a silly hobby, turned into dozens of lifelong friendships and a career I truly love.

My name is Chris Cassidy, I’m a transit operator with Coast Mountain Bus Company and I Love Transit.

Transit enthusiasts take note because this could be you! Thanks to Chris for sharing his awesome experiences and inspiring the next generation of transit fans.

Author: Adrienne Coling

C9 Community Shuttle takes a temporary detour

Community Shuttle
Attention all C9 riders!

To accommodate City of New Westminster construction of a bus-only turn signal, the C9 will be temporarily detoured starting in September.

Click the map below to see a larger version of the detour.

C9 detour
Taking the C9? Make your way to any of the following stops:

  • 58742 – NB Richmond @ Miner
  • 52328 – SB Richmond @ Miner
  • 52327 – SB Richmond @ Seymour Ct

From New Westminster Station (Bay 5): via McNeely St, Carnarvon St, 8 St, Columbia St, Richmond St, Jamieson Ct, turn-around, Jamieson Ct, Richmond St, Miner St, Cumberland St, Richmond St, E Columbia St, North Rd Gatineau Pl to Lougheed Station.

From Lougheed Station (Bay 10): via Gatineau Pl, North Rd, E Columbia St, Richmond St, Miner St, Cumberland St, Richmond St, Jamieson Ct, turn-around, Jamieson Ct, Richmond St, Columbia St to New Westminster Station.

Once construction is complete, these stops will remain in service, with a new stop added to the corner of Cumberland St and Richmond St.

Did you know?

Permanent route changes to the C9 are being implemented as a result of the 2015 Transit Network Review (TNR).

Last October and November, TransLink consulted the public and as a result, we received more than 12,000 completed surveys and hundreds of emails, letters and phone calls.

To-date, 14 of the 26 approved packages consulted on have now been implemented. Some route changes, like the C9 have been phased in.

For more information on the Transit Network Review, visit

Author: Jessica Hewitt

I Love Transit: “My Best Passenger”


It’s here, it’s here! I Love Transit 2016 is here!

Some of the best stories of transit love come to us from our front line staff like our bus operators.

Vickie Bowne has been an operator since 1998 and has been working out out of the Port Coquitlam transit centre for the past 17 years.

Recently Vickie had, what she describes as, the the best day of her transit career thanks to her bus buddy, 10-year-old Aidan (aka her ‘best passenger’) and everyone at the PoCo depot who made HIS day!

Read on about Vickie, Aidan and the best. day. ever.

I first met Aidan about a month ago when he rode my bus.  He then got on again a few weeks later and after discussing things with him and his nurse we arranged to have Aidan tour the Poco Transit Depot.

Once there, the staff in the front office welcomed him. He was given all kinds of fun stuff!

Then the maintenance supervisor showed him the maintenance yard where the buses get fixed. We then walked through the depot and introduced him to quite a few drivers, some who knew him. He was sure in his element! 20160727_133933

He talked about wanting to work here someday. Said he could empty the fare boxes as a job, or work with computers. I told him he definitely could do anything!

When I had to get to Coquitlam for my second piece of work, Aidan was not tired and asked to join me.

When we went out to Poco Station, my transit Supervisor got him a private ride in a shuttle that just happened to be deadheading there. Aidan loved the ride in the Community Shuttle bus.

Then Aidan boarded my #152 and rode that route and stayed on for my #151 back to Coquitlam where he insisted he wanted to ride the bendy #701 bus home. We made sure that happened.

Thank you to all the drivers who introduced yourself to him! He was talking about many of you later on in the day.

Oh, and I am happy to say that according to Aidan, I am the best bus driver! Yup, and then his next comment “I am your best passenger, right?” You sure are, Aidan! Also I am suppose to print out a picture of him and I together and put it on my desk. Too cute.

What a gift to the world he is. I am blessed to call him friend.


What does Vickie love about transit?  For her, it’s all about the connections she makes!

“As a driver I love the interaction with the people that ride our buses.  I have seen kids grow up, new refugees figuring out the bus routes, many seniors struggling to get by, and many that have passed away.  The connections we make affect their lives and I just hope that if they ride my bus it is in a positive way.”

Author: Adrienne Coling

49 detour ending September 5!

Good news, 49ers! (The riders of the route, not San Fran’s team)

The City of Vancouver sewer main construction and road work along Marine Drive is almost complete. And that means…the 49 will go back to its regular route!

On Monday, September 5, the 49 will service the following as part of its regular route:

  • 49th Avenue between West Boulevard and SW Marine Drive;
  • SW Marine Drive between 49th Avenue and Dunbar Street; and
  • Dunbar Street between SW Marine Drive and 41st Avenue.

An added bonus, on weekends, the 49 will now be sporting full articulated buses (see above photo) giving customers more options to travel to UBC.

We appreciate your patience during the City’s construction work.

Don’t forget! Fall service changes also go into effect September 5. Visit for more details.

Author: Jessica Hewitt