ALERT! : More info
Translink Buzzer Blog

Category: Guest Posts

I Love Transit 2017: Electric buses—exploring the transit industry’s next frontier with our customers

I Love Transit 2017

The new fast-charge battery-electric bus operating in Seattle.

It’s I Love Transit Week! A week where we celebrate our riders, transit enthusiasts and all the things we love about transit. For the first time this year, we have a theme: Beyond—the future of transportation in Metro Vancouver. Battery-electric buses are poised to be the next big leap in technology for the transit industry, so we decided to ask a planner to explain what it means for us! 

David Cooper

By David Cooper, senior planner, TransLink

One of the exciting technology advances in the public transit world is the deployment of battery-electric buses.

As we are seeing a transition in the auto industry from the internal combustion engine to electricity, transit agencies including TransLink are exploring the suitability of adopting this technology for our future bus fleet. Read more »

I Love Transit 2017: #DerrickThePlanner visioning Metro Vancouver’s future

I Love Transit 2017

Derrick Swallow, an assistant transportation planner at TransLink, shares his vision for the future of transportation in Metro Vancouver in this guest post.

It’s I Love Transit Week! A week where we celebrate our riders, transit enthusiasts and all the things we love about transit. For the first time this year, we have a theme: Beyond—the future of transportation in Metro Vancouver. Who better to ask about the future than a planner that’s helping to plan for the future!

Read more »

I Love Transit: Redhead Mare guest post – Vancouver Travel Tip

I Love Transit 2016

I love transit week is coming to a close, and I kind of feel like this has been the best week ever! Today, our guest poster vlogger Redhead Mare shares with us how her family uses and loves transit!

Thanks for sharing the love and transit tips! Check out Mare and her other adventures over on her blog!

What are your SkyTrain tips when travelling with kids?

I Love Transit: Spokesmama Guest Post – Camping via Transit

I Love Transit 2016

On the bus in Nanaimo

To help celebrate I love transit week, Lisa – also known as Spokesmama, is guest posting and sharing with us how her and her family use transit on their weekend adventures!

This summer we tried something new to us: camping by transit. We don’t own a car, so we generally rent or use Modo car co-op vehicles, or bike to camp. We heard that Newcastle Island was a great destination, and quickly realized that transit was the best way for us to get there. Taking the bus meant carrying nearly everything on our backs except for a small cart that held our cooler and some of the heavier items; planning what we’d bring was a fun challenge.

Read more »

Biking to the ferry: A transportation planner’s journey

Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal (BCIT)

Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal (Courtesy of BCIT)

Island season is most definitely here! Before the summer slips away *tear* we have some adventure ideas for all of you cycling enthusiasts and budding bikers!

Read on to learn some routes that you can take to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal that have been collected and expertly researched by avid cyclist and TransLink Assistant Transportation Planner, Denis Agar.

One of the most incredible things about living in Metro Vancouver is that we have beautiful wilderness right on our doorstep. There are a number of exciting destinations to explore on the transit network, and even more are just a short BC Ferries ride away.

Did you know that a bike can take you from one tip of Salt Spring Island to the other in just 2.5 hours?

Even beginner cyclists can enjoy low-stress cycle touring on the Gulf Islands and Vancouver Island, with plenty of campgrounds and B&Bs available to spend the night.

While BC Ferries charges up to $115 round trip to bring your car to the islands, they charge just $4.00 round trip to bring your bike aboard.

The only part that can be a little challenging is getting to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal with your bike.

All of TransLink’s buses are equipped with bike racks which can make it easier and faster to get to the ferry terminal, but these buses only carry two bikes at a time, which can be a challenge at peak times.  But don’t worry, because you have alternatives!

So, if you’re trying to get to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal with your bike, here are some options worth considering.

*All hypothetical trips start at Waterfront Station to make comparison simple*

Richard Eriksson

Courtesy of Richard Eriksson

Bus route 620 direct to Ferry Terminal
Route 620 is your direct route from Bridgeport Canada Line station to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal. It’s timed to connect with the ferry to Swartz Bay (Victoria) and at busy times, up to three buses can be scheduled to meet the same ferry departure! At peak times, it can be difficult to predict whether there will be room for your bike on the bus, because of the high levels of demand. The following two alternatives are more reliable, and they also leave from the same station!

Bus route 601/602/603/604 to 56 Street and Highway 17
Your next best option is to take one of the four bus routes that go from Bridgeport Station to the village of Tsawwassen. You’ll want to get off the bus at the corner of 56 Street and Highway 17, and bike west on Highway 17’s bike lanes for roughly 20 minutes to get to the ferry terminal.

Bus route 351 to Matthews Exchange
Although this option takes longer, two key factors make it a stress-free choice:

  • The extremely frequent route 351 is unlikely to leave you behind, and if it does, it’s only 15 minutes to wait until the next bus.
  • The 60 minute ride from Matthews Exchange to the ferry terminal is breathtakingly beautiful, along the Boundary Bay Dyke.
Heather Harvey

Courtesy of Heather Harvey

Massey Tunnel shuttle
This option involves a free shuttle that takes you from one side of the Massey Tunnel to the other. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure operates this service, which can carry up to seven people and bikes at a time, making it ideal for cycling with big groups. If there are more than seven people waiting, the shuttle will come back ASAP to pick them up.

If you want to take this shuttle but don’t want to bike all the way from your home to the shuttle stop, you can take the Canada Line to Richmond–Brighouse Station and ride to the shuttle pickup point from there.

Bike across the Alex Fraser Bridge

Courtesy of Pete

Courtesy of Pete

If you want to bike all the way from your home to the ferry terminal, your closest bike-friendly crossing is the Alex Fraser Bridge between New Westminster and Delta. That’s more than a three hour trip, but there are a number of ways you can shorten it:

  • Take the SkyTrain from Vancouver to 22nd Street Station and bike from there.
  • At 22nd Street Station, you can also catch the 340, 388, or 104 buses that will take you right to the foot of the bridge at the corner of Cliveden Avenue and Hwy 91 off ramp.
  • On the other side of the bridge, you can catch the 640 bus at the corner of Nordel Way and Nordel Court, which will take you to Ladner.
  • At Ladner Exchange, you can catch one of the buses from options one or two that will help you on your way.

For more details on each option, click here.

If you encounter any issues with this information, or if anything has changed, let us know in the comments!

Author: Denis Agar

Friday fun guest post: Crushed Cheerios finds adventure on the Millennium Line

SkyTrain at VCC-Clark Station

Families have endless options for fun on the Millennium Line!

Crushed Cheerios is back for part two of the adventures on the SkyTrain! Last time she took us for a ride on the Expo Line. This time, we travel with Tasha and her boys along the Millennium Line. Stay tuned for the final post in this series about the Canada Line coming soon!


A couple of weeks ago I posted a list of Expo Line adventures. Here is a list of some of my favourites along the Millennium Line!

VCC-Clark

  • China Creek – A great little  area for spending a day at the park. You can play soccer, draw with chalk, have a picnic and play at the playground. It’s a short walk from the SkyTrain.

Commercial-Broadway

  • Trout Lake Community Centre – Like many of the recreation centres in Metro Vancouver, there’s a drop in most days of the week (generally they are Mon-Sat, but vary from location to location) It’s a great place to run off some steam and enjoy some socialization for both kids and adults.
  • Trout Lake – There’s a great playground located next to the community centre. There’s a sandy beach area along the mini-lake that you can splash in during the summer or build sandcastles year round. It has lots of green space to play sports, have a picnic or play fetch with your dog.

CheeriosMill1Brentwood

  • Brentwood Mall – There’s an indoor play area that is fun for little ones at the mall. It can sometimes get really busy, though – and parents will sometimes allow their older, rambunctious children to terrorize through there. Avoiding peak times is ideal! If you go first thing in the morning or during the typical nap time, it can be pretty peaceful.
  • Confederation Park – this is a bit of a walk from the SkyTrain station but so definitely worth it!! I used to live about a 40 minute walk from here and would go often with my first, when he was only ten months old. It’s got a library, swimming pool/recreation centre, running track, trails, water park, playground and big open fields to play on. There’s also a model steam train close by (seasonal, I believe – check before going!) It’s a great park to spend an hour – or the entire day.

Sperling-Burnaby Lake

  • Burnaby Lake – This was a favourite walking place pre-baby and pre-mobile baby. We lived close by and would venture there once a week to walk about 10km. There are duck ponds and plenty of paths to choose from (you can walk anywhere from 2km to 15km following the different paths) There’s also a handful of bathrooms along the route.

 

CheeriosMill2Lougheed

  • Lougheed Mall – Coming in March 2015, is an indoor playground inside the mall. I am not talking the little tiny play areas meant for young children. I would say this is aimed for 5-8 year olds. Great for rainy days (though I would much prefer to get my child outside to play, I like the idea of a park in the mall for rainy days/running errands) This mall also has an indoor play area for younger kids.
  • Blue Mountain Park – Again, not quite immediate SkyTrain area, but worth the 30 minute walk! It’s a fun little playground and spray park. I’ve gone a few times with my oldest, the most recent time at almost two years old, and he’s loved it every time. He enjoyed the “bumpy slide” and sitting atop of the horse statues.

 

CheeriosMill3Braid

  • Hume Park – Another day-trip park. There’s a spray park, a couple of playgrounds, a dog-park, fields and an outdoor playground. There are some paths for exploring and a creek you can splash in.
  • IKEA – Not to be totally nerdy, but this is MY favourite place. And D actually asks to go here at least once a month. It may not sound exciting, but it’s the perfect place to explore on a rainy weekday. Cheap breakfast, fun little areas to explore and if your kids are tall enough, you could drop them off at the play area while you do a bit of shopping. Don’t forget the frozen yogurt on the way out (which I swear is the only reason D requests to go! HA!)

Sapperton

  • Sapperton Landing Park – Enjoy a scenic walk along the water, just steps from the SkyTrain station. There are viewpoints as you walk the stretch to sit and look out at the Fraser River – two out of the three times we’ve gone, we got to see seals (or maybe they were sea lions?) swimming past us! My oldest loves watching the train cross the bridge from this walking trail. There are bridges to cross, which is also another huge hit for my two year old!

There’s many other things to do at the SkyTrain stops along the Millennium Line. Do you have any other favourites?

Author: Adrienne Coling

Friday fun guest post: Crushed Cheerios finds adventure on the Expo Line

Lots to see and do along the Expo Line!

Lots to see and do along the Expo Line!

We’re very pleased to have a guest post this week, which is part one in a three-part series. Tasha, the author behind the mommy blog Crushed Cheerios, took her two boys along the Expo Line to see what they could see and do what they could do! She has some great ideas and suggestions for loads of fun that can work for families using the TransLink system around Metro Vancouver. Stay tuned for her adventures on the Millennium and Canada Line coming soon!


SkyTrain Line Adventures: Expo Line

Looking for fun things to do around town?

Hop on the train and pick one of the many stations along the line to explore!

Waterfront Station :

  • SeaBus – The SeaBus runs every 15-30 minutes and goes from Waterfront to North Vancouver. The ride itself is a favourite of my toddlers but there’s also the Lonsdale Quay to explore, including a ball pit (free entry!) upstairs and some shops to browse. A short walk away is a park with views of the water with many boats and container ships going past.
  • West Coast Express Train – While we’ve never gone on the train, we love watching it arrive and depart the station! It’s a commuter train and only runs during weekdays in peak directions so we’ve never taken it. It also has a (separate from the SkyTrain/bus) fee and from what I’ve heard, not stroller friendly. You can watch it from the walkway that leads to the SeaBus.
  • Harbour Centre – Take a trip to the top and view Vancouver from high above the crowds!
  • Canada Place – Stroll around Canada Place / Seven Sails. Depending on the time of year, you can see the cruise ships coming into port. The Olympic Cauldron is a short walk. And there’s access to the Sea Wall if you’re up for a longer walk.

Granville Station :

  • Vancouver Public Library – They have an expansive kids section with a small little play area (best for the younger-than-3-years group) and have many story times or activities for children.

Stadium Station :

  • Chinatown – Take a walk and get immersed in the culture. There are night markets during Summer months.
  • False Creek – A great place to walk to see the boats and dragon boaters. You can walk for kilometres in either direction along the smooth, flat, paved paths that have many parks along the way.

Main Street / Science World :

  • Science World – We have memberships for Science World and we go frequently. There is lots to do and see and touch!
  • Ferry Ride – A fun ride! You can take the ferry from next to Science World and go to Granville Island (technically not walking distance from a skytrain station – so I won’t go into much details but there’s the Kids Market and lots of buskers, magic shows, etc to look at. In the summer, there’s a water park. And there’s a few playgrounds to visit throughout the year)

Broadway Station :

  • Commercial Drive – Plenty of interesting shops to browse through. There’s a few kids stores that carry things that aren’t found in the big box stores, like TRU and Target etc.
  • Trout Lake – Community centre with drop ins, pond and playgrounds.

Patterson Station :

  • Central Park – Playground, walking trails, duck pond and an outdoor swimming pool. Lots to do!

Metrotown Station :

  • Metrotown Mall – We love to go on the train that goes from one end of the mall to the other. A few times, we’ve gone to the mall JUST for the train ride! It’s small though – no strollers allowed on busy days. Sometimes when it’s quieter, the conductor will allow you to fold your stroller and put it in one of the train cars. We also like to go wander through Toys R Us and the Disney Store. There’s also three Starbucks and two Tim Horton’s there… Just saying.
  • Bonsor – There’s a playground and skate park. While we’ve never found the skate park empty to let Dean roam, he does enjoy watching people do tricks (and bails!) on the ramps. The playground is perfect for his age (2.5 years old) but also challenging enough to keep older kids busy!

Edmonds :

  • Taylor Park / Byrne Creek / Ron McLean Park – Just off of Edmonds SkyTrain station is three park areas combined in one place! Playgrounds, wading pool (summer months when a park leader is on site), trails and fields!
  • Edmonds Community Centre – It’s about a 20 minute walk, but well worth it! There’s a great indoor pool – We drive past two pools from our house to this pool because it’s amazing! It’s warmer than most and it has a lazy river and a kids play area. There’s drop in programs there. And they also have a free indoor playground that’s not usually too busy.

New Westminster Station :

  • Shops at New Westminster – Right at the SkyTrain station, there is numerous shops and places to eat. Spud Shack is one of my favourites! There’s also two Starbucks and a Tim Horton’s at the station. On the concourse level, there is a play area for children with slides. It’s covered from the rain and has heaters for those cooler days.
  • Quay boardwalk – This is our “go-to” outing. We take a walk along the boardwalk to any (and sometimes all) of the three parks. There’s sand volleyball fields, sandy “beach” (think a gigantic sandbox) to sit under umbrellas, lots of benches and chairs to stop for a snack. It’s flat and paved so my son LOVES speeding along with his bike. It’s decently straight so I can keep sight of him, even when he leaves me in the dust. And there’s frequently trains that go by – we always love watching them from close up! There’s also the…..
  • River Market – There’s a few shops and some places to get food. There’s an upstairs area for younger kids (0-4 years old, I would say) The Circus School is great, but they don’t have very many drop-in time slots. Though, it’s still neat to watch the classes as they learn to do fancy aerobatics!

Surrey Central Station :

  • City Centre Library – This library is walking distance from us. We LOVE going here, even if we don’t have our books to return to get new ones! There’s lots to do and explore inside. The library’s children section has fun rocking chairs, benches with treasures to view through peepholes, activity wall-mounts and pillows to cozy up on.

 

There’s plenty of other parks, walking distance from the SkyTrain stations that I haven’t listed but there’s just too many!

Do you and your family have any other favourites?

Author: Adrienne Coling

I Love Transit 2014: Jason Vanderhill, TransLinked and Illustrated Vancouver curator, guests posts

I Love Transit 2014 Banner

It’s I Love Transit Week and we’re lucky to have Jason Vanderhill, Translinked and Illustrated Vancouver, write a guest blog post for us sharing some of the top transit related images he has found over the years. You can follow him on Twitter at @jmv. We also had the pleasure of having Jason and cohorts on the blog for our Life on Transit series.

Jason Vanderhill

Jason Vanderhill

I have had an interest in transportation related imagery ever since I can remember.

In 2010, I joined Tumblr, and along with Richard and Karen at Translinked.com, we have now compiled over 850 posts on the subject.

The classic travel poster is easily a favourite subcategory of mine, and along with many national airways and railroads, the London Transport and New York’s MTA have a proven track record in this realm.

Not simply confined to the poster, transit related imagery can also appear in brochures, flyers, maps, newspaper ads, and magazine covers.

Below are a few of my favourite posts from around the world, featuring two from London, one from Copenhagen, two more from NYC, and one from the CPR here at home.

Summer Outings by Private Bus (via LTMuseum’s year of the bus)

Summer Outings by Private Bus (via LTMuseum’s year of the bus)

The Tube Train, by Cyril Edward Power (via auctioncentralnews.com)

The Tube Train by Cyril Edward Power (via auctioncentralnews.com)

Read more »

Friday fun guest post: A history of monorails in Vancouver, by Michael Taylor-Noonan

The monorail at Expo 86. Photo credit: Colin Rose.

I’m happy to welcome another guest post from Michael Taylor-Noonan, the newsletter editor for the Transit Museum Society! (He previously wrote guest posts about Vancouver bus numbers, and reminiscences of early Vancouver transit.) This time, Michael has kindly contributed a short history of monorails in Vancouver. Read on for more!

Readers old enough to remember EXPO 86 will certainly remember the monorail used for transporting visitors around the worlds’ fair site. That monorail, built by Von Roll of Switzerland, is still providing transportation, but now at Alton Towers theme park in the UK. It was installed there in 1987. During its one summer of operation, it was certainly the closest Vancouverites came to having a monorail as a permanent addition to the transportation network.

The idea of a monorail in Vancouver is certainly not new, though. You may be surprised to learn that there have been two proposals to build a monorail between downtown Vancouver and the airport. The first was in the mid-fifties when YVR (as it’s known today) proposed a growth strategy that reserved the airport for long-haul flights. Service to cities in B.C. such as Victoria, Powell River, and Kelowna would be by helicopter from a downtown heliport. Connecting the two would be a monorail. It would cover the 15km or so in ten minutes, and would include possible freight and mail service.

Read more »

Friday fun guest post: My Travels with Norm, reminiscences of the Vancouver streetcar and interurban, by Michael Taylor-Noonan

Transit Museum Society volunteer Norm, photographed inside the restored B.C. Electric interurban car #1207.

I’m happy to welcome back Michael Taylor-Noonan, the newsletter editor for the Transit Museum Society (TRAMS), for another guest post! (He previously wrote a guest post about bus numbering in Vancouver.) This time, Michael has kindly contributed an interview with Norm, a fellow TRAMS member who rode Vancouver transit in the early part of the twentieth century. Read on for a look at how the system worked back then!

My Travels with Norm, by Michael Taylor-Noonan

Norm and I are travelling along Highway 1. We’re on our way to the Transit Museum maintenance shop near the Burnaby – Vancouver border. Norm no longer drives, so every second Sunday I take him to the shop. I’ve been doing this for quite a while, and each time I drive Norm, I first ask how he’s been in the intervening two weeks.

Pretty good for an old guy he says. He’s 86: a retired machinist who’s worked on many things throughout his working career from screws to ships. Now Norm is a volunteer with Trams. His skill machining small parts comes in very handy. He also has amassed a great collection of tools over the years, some of which he brings to the shop in four very heavy toolboxes. And every time he lets me carry his tools out to the car, he reminds me that he was born in 1924, one year after Vancouver’s first bus ran.

And so the conversation shifts to his favourite topic: life in that Vancouver of years past when buses, streetcars and interurbans all displayed one name: B.C. Electric Railway Co. However, I decide today will be different, I will just not listen to Norm’s stories, I will begin to record them, transcribe them, and post them here. Like any good storyteller at a party, he at first doesn’t want to tell me anything, but is eventually ‘persuaded’ to begin…. “Well, seeing as you asked….”.

Read more »

Friday fun guest post: It’s all about the numbers… on the bus, by Michael Taylor-Noonan

Our old and new trolleybuses at an event in 2007 --- you can clearly see their differing bus numbers!

For this Friday fun post, Michael Taylor-Noonan, the editor of the Transit Museum Society‘s newsletter has kindly contributed a piece on the history of bus numbering! Read on for a deep dive into the numbers we see today.

For this first guest blog, I’ve decided to write about bus numbers – not the ones on the front that tell you where your bus is headed, but the ones on the side, back and front that distinguish one bus from hundreds of identical vehicles. For years this was known as a ‘unit’ number, but now it can be called an asset number, fleet number, or bus number, depending on who you are talking to.

Read more »

Tim Choi writes in about transit in Istanbul, part II

The ferry Tim rode from Besiktas on the European side of the city to Kadikoy on the Asian side.

Reader Tim Choi is in Istanbul for a few months and has sent back a few observations about the transit system! Here’s his second dispatch about Istanbul’s ferries — you can also read his first dispatch about buses and minibuses.

A ferry terminal building in Istanbul. Photo by Tim Choi.

Hello Jhen! Here is a post on Istanbul’s ferries, with video.

The first three videos are as we took a ferry from Besiktas on the European side of the city to Kadikoy on the Asian side. The ferry in question is shown above – very classy and beautiful, also quite old, with real wooden decking. It is capable of carrying 1500 passengers. For our particular trip, it took 20 minutes. All ferry trips cost 1.50 Turkish Liras, around $1.10 CAD. It’s a very cheap way to enjoy and watch the city. Servers are on board all vessels, selling tea and coffee.

The terminal buildings are also quite interesting – the picture at right was taken inside one, looking towards the doors and water. Embarking procedures are a little less chaotic than for buses, but just barely – the ship pulls up to the dock, the ramps are connected, passengers disembark (either through or beside the ramps!), terminal doors open, and passengers race across the apron towards the ramps. You can see visually the dock layout in the videos.

Read more »

Tim Choi writes in about transit in Istanbul

The Taksim bus loop in Istanbul! Photo by Tim Choi.

Reader Tim Choi sent in this dispatch about transit in Istanbul, and I thought it made a good blog post! Herein are his thoughts.

Hi Jhen!

I’m currently in Istanbul for the next four months on a student exchange and thought I’d share some transit info with you!

Attached are two pictures of the bus loop at Taksim, the entertainment district of Istanbul.

Taksim bus loop at night. Photo by Tim Choi.

In the first picture, you see three buses side-by-side, each having just pulled in with only enough room between them for two people to walk past. Later on in the evening, there were eventually SIX buses side-by-side, the 6th stopping in the middle of the road! To the bottom left, you’ll see a ubiquitous water bottle stand – because tap water is not safe to drink, bottled water is in very high demand in Turkey (therefore also very cheap).

The second picture is taken to the right of where I was standing – note the people waiting for the buses in clumps and on the middle of the road – lining up does not happen here.

Read more »

Guest post: Vancouver transit and art in the Capilano Calendar series

Train 118, by Mika Joronen. Photo from <a href=http://www.capcalendar.com/mikajoronen.html>the Capilano Calendar site</a>.

Train 118, by Mika Joronen. Photo from the Capilano Calendar site.

Here’s a follow-up guest post by Jason Vanderhill, an avid artist and photographer, plus designer of several transit buttons that you might have in your collection.

Almost 2 years ago now, I put together a little Vancouver Transit and Art post for the Buzzer blog and included one of the images from the Capilano Calendar of 2010 (Ferry to Horseshoe Bay by Katrina Espetveidt).

I had a lot of fun putting that post together, so I thought I ought to revisit the theme and shine a special spotlight on the Capilano Calendar series.

The Capilano IDEA Program’s Reflections Vancouver 2011 Calendar was officially launched Tuesday evening in West Vancouver, and this year, I attended the opening.

I got to meet a number of the artists this year, including Mika Joronen, the student responsible for building this year’s CapCalendars website. He told me he has a soft spot for transportation and has also painted a number of train stations from his travels. He chose to paint the Canada Line as his subject matter for this year’s series. (Train 118 by Mika Joronen) This painting isn’t officially included in the 2011 calendar, but the original painting is for sale for $950, as are all of the other original paintings in this series. Act fast; these items are apt to sell out!

Read more »

Guest post: Vancouver Transit and Art

Ink illustration by Peter R. Bach.

Ink illustration by Peter R. Bach.

Here’s a lovely change of pace from all the Canada Line stuff. This is a guest post by Jason Vanderhill, who is an avid artist and photographer, as well as designer of several transit buttons that you might have in your collection.

Over the past year or so, I’ve taken up a new hobby. Call it SkyTrainSpotting in Fine Art, I am essentially looking for cameos or references to Vancouver transit in fine art.

Of course, I’m not limiting myself to SkyTrains, but I am trying to limit the scope as much as possible to public transit, just to remain focused. Thus far, my search has brought together scenes featuring the SkyTrain and surroundings, TransLink buses, a Seabus, and even a Coastal Renaissance BC Ferry. To be clear, I’m not always purchasing these artworks, as much as I would like to. I am, instead, making note of the work, keeping an eye on the artist’s work for future consideration.

One of the first pieces I did acquire was a print of an ink illustration of Vancouver’s skyline prominently featuring a Seabus, illustrated by graphic designer Peter R Bach of Burnaby.

The illustration (shown above) was part of a series of 6 prints showcasing Vancouver cityscapes and architectural landmarks. Peter passed away in 2006, but I’ve learned from the artist’s family that he came to Canada in 1979 and did these illustrations between 1982 and 1984, showcasing Vancouver Pre-Expo! Some pretty dramatic changes have occurred to the skyline since then!

Read more »