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Translink Buzzer Blog

Category: Planning for the Future

Have you received your voting package?

Courtesy of Elections BC

Courtesy of Elections BC

The Transportation and Transit plebiscite for Metro Vancouver is in full swing as we approach the one month mark of voting next week.

Have you received your voting package yet?

If you register online, it may take several weeks to receive your ballot from Elections BC.

This is especially important for post-secondary students in the region who are ending their school terms and may be moving.

We encourage everyone to check in or register by phone to ensure you get their ballot with enough time to vote and send it back to be counted.

If you did not receive a voting package, ask for one at 1-800-661-8683 before midnight on May 15, 2015

Confused on how to fill out and return you ballot? Check out this video!

You can take a look at the Mayors’ Council plan for the region on their website.

For the low down on the plebiscite itself and registering, please visit here.

Remember, your completed ballot must be received by Elections BC before
8pm on Friday May, 29, 2015 to be counted.

 

Transportation and Transit plebiscite: Voting begins

plebiscite vector

Voting takes place from March 16 to May 29

Today marks the beginning of the Transportation and Transit plebiscite. Voting packages will be mailed out to all registered voters. You have until May 29th to cast your vote.

Here’s the gist: One million new residents are arriving in Metro Vancouver over the next 30 years. We need to get our transportation system ready for growth — and lots of it!

So Metro Vancouver registered voters are being asked  to decide if they support the 0.5% Metro Vancouver Congestion Improvement Tax.

The tax would be collected with the provincial sales tax.

The Mayors’ Council released this message to residents today.

You can see the plan and more information on the Mayors’ Council website.

Whatever you decide, make your voice heard and vote! To register or update your information, contact Elections BC at  or call 1-800-661-8683.

Important Dates

March 16 – 27

Voting packages mailed to registered voters.

March 16 – May 15

Voters may ask for voting package.

April 13

Plebiscite Service Offices open for local ballot drops and general plebiscite information. Be sure to check here for locations.

Midnight, Friday, May 15

The time to ask for a voting package ends.

8 p.m., Friday, May 29

Close of voting. All voting packages must be received by Elections BC by this date and time in order to have your vote count.

From planning department to transit centre: A three-month experience

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Michelle Babiuk presenting a Safe Driving award to bus operator George Economou on his B-line 99 route.

Meet Michelle Babiuk. She’s the one in the hat, above. Hi Michelle! She is a TransLink transportation planner in Infrastructure and Network Management. But for the past few months, she’s taken on a different, temporary role. That of operations supervisor out of the Burnaby Transit Centre.

While working closely with the depot manager in her planning position, it was suggested that it might be a good experience for her to get out there and see what drivers and supervisors experience every day. So she did! It’s three months later and she’s learned a lot that she will be taking back to the planning department at TransLink. We sat down with Michelle to talk about her experience.

Why did you take a secondment to become an operations supervisor?

My thought was, the more I see on the ground, the better I can plan. On the infrastructure and network design side, you can understand how operators are using the system and what their experiences are. The more you understand what people do out there the more you understand what you’re seeing in the data. This allows you to better plan or design something that is realistic. Drivers have a lot of information we don’t and that’s very valuable.

I also wanted to learn the rhythm of a day at a transit centre. What do the supervisors do? What do the operators do? What are the potential communication touch points and tools that we can use to reach people? We want to get information back from them because they have suggestions just like the public does. We also want to find the best way we can get information out to them.

What have you learned while in the supervisor role?

The most interesting thing I’ve learned is what it is like to work with a mobile workforce. I have a large number of operators that work all different shifts and some you see very rarely. That’s why it’s important to get out there on the routes and interact with them to give and receive information.

Day to day, that was one of the challenges. I think the staff here work really hard to be out meeting people on their buses in the evenings, on weekends and if they can find a spare minute, during the day. The operators really appreciate it. When you deliver awards on the bus, people get really excited! They feel like you’re seeing their reality by being on the bus with them.

What will you take from this experience back to your planner role?

The easiest thing to action from what I’ve learned from my time here is communications. Understanding what opportunities there are here to increase communication and how information spreads. We can be out there and be visible with information sessions – like the ones CMBC planning and scheduling do now four times a year.

I’ve seen other ways information gets shared, like a paddle stuffer. So anyone starting their shift picks up their paddle [wooden boards with daily route info and more] and gets anything you need to tell them. You can’t relay a ton of information that way, but you can let the operators know what’s going on with certain projects and how they can give feedback.

We’ve also been exploring the idea of getting out in the evenings and doing some work at bus loops. Operators can spread the word from those interactions, too. It’s about learning what works for all sides, how to ask questions and provide information that resonates with operators.

Getting out of the office to visit Michelle at a transit centre was a great experience for me, too!

It was such a pleasure to meet George, hear his stories from the front lines and see what happens before the buses get out on the road. Understanding how he and other operators interact with our riders is so valuable. The more opportunities we have to hear what operators and riders are saying, the better we can work together to make positive changes across the system.

Thanks so much for the interview, Michelle and good luck heading back to the planning team!

Transportation and Transit Plebiscite: March 16 – May 29, 2015

plebiscite vector

Transportation and Transit Plebiscite: March 16 – May 29, 2015

Plebiscite. Referendum. Transit tax. These words have been on everyone’s lips for the last few weeks, months even. Because Metro Vancouver registered voters are being asked to cast their ballots from March 16th until May 29th of this year to decide if they support the 0.5% Metro Vancouver Congestion Improvement Tax. The tax would be collected with the provincial sales tax.

Why is this happening, you ask? Well, with one million new residents arriving in Metro Vancouver over the next 30 years, we need to get our transportation system ready for growth — and lots of it! The region’s mayors have developed a transportation and transit plan to meet this growth.

Take a look at what this would mean:

  • A 25% increase in bus service, including 11 new B-Line rapid bus routes across the region
  • Increased service on SkyTrain, Canada Line, SeaBus and West Coast Express
  • Maintaining and upgrading the region’s major roads
  • A new Pattullo Bridge
  • Light rail transit connecting Surrey Centre, Guildford, Newton and Langley
  • An extension of the Millennium Line, tunneled below Broadway in Vancouver, from VCC-Clark station to Arbutus Street
  • Investments to improve safety and access for cyclists and pedestrians

You can see more on the Mayors’ Council website.

You decide

All registered Metro Vancouver voters will vote by mail-in ballot between March 16 and May 29, 2015. To register, or update your information, contact Elections BC at  or call 1-800-661-8683.

Interview with interim TransLink CEO Doug Allen

TransLink interim CEO, Doug Allen

TransLink interim CEO, Doug Allen

Unless you’ve been completely unplugged for the past few weeks, you’ll know that we had a leadership change here at TransLink. Doug Allen has joined TransLink for six months as our interim CEO. Mr. Allen comes to TransLink with years of experience in leadership roles and he isn’t new to the transit scene, either. From 2011 to 2014, he served as President and CEO of InTransit BC, which built and operates the Canada Line, linking YVR and Richmond to downtown Vancouver.

So, in order to get to know him better, we sat down with him to ask him a few questions about himself and what he foresees in the coming months.

The Board of Directors says that they made this move to restore public confidence. So how will you go about restoring public confidence in your new role?

The CEO has to come in with a very strong plan of action to have a good fresh look at everything and decide what is right and decide what needs improvement. So once you’ve decided where you can make improvements, you make them. And you try to ensure that our service is extremely good, reliable, and of high quality –  that’s clean and safe. It’s not one person that will do that, it has to be the whole team at TransLink. The CEO sets the tone.

Where do you think you will be making changes?

I have to take to look at everything that’s important. Every major issue. I have to understand it; I have to have a sense of if it’s being managed properly or not. I have to ensure that the right people are accountable for their actions around those major initiatives. Then if we need to make some changes, we make them and move forward.

What are the key things you will focus on as interim CEO?

One of the key things is service delivery. My tenets are: reliability, quality and safety. If you can deliver well on these on a consistent basis, then the customers will be happy, and our other partners can have a strong supportive response as well.

How do you think your experience, specifically when it comes to the Canada Line, will help you in this role?

The Canada Line is viewed by many as the best public-private partnership operating in the country and that’s a pretty large statement. Going back to my three tenets, Canada Line was – and is – delivered in a highly reliable fashion, it is high quality, and it’s clean and safe. They’ve done a really great job of delivering. That’s what I aim to bring to TransLink.

Two major issues in the public’s mind right now are executive pay and the SkyTrain shutdowns last summer. What do you think you can do to address these issues?

When a new CEO comes in, he has to look at everything, including compensation. In terms of the SkyTrain shutdowns last summer, there was an independent review that made 20 recommendations that TransLink is now working to implement. I’m going to have a good look again at the review and how we’re doing at implementing the recommendations.

There is some speculation that CEO change at this time has to do with the referendum and getting a YES vote. What do you think?

My responsibility is to lead a sound and solid organization, and set the platform for the new permanent CEO. That’s my focus.

What is your favourite way to travel around Metro Vancouver on transit?

I take the #84 to VCC Clark and then take the SkyTrain to the TransLink offices at Sapperton. I use all modes of transit – and I think we have a great system here in the Lower Mainland.

Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas – Carl Guardino

The first of the SFU lecture series this year!

TransLink in collaboration with the SFU City Program is pleased to announce another installment of the Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas series. This latest installment is with Carl Guardino, widely lauded as one of the most influential forces on transportation policy and funding in the San Francisco and Silicon Valley area, where such ballot measures are routine and have successfully funded major transportation improvements.

Here’s a bit about Mr. Guardino’s talk and about the man himself:

 

Transportation Referendum: Lessons Learned from the Front Line

 

A healthy and competitive economy relies on efficient transportation. In Metro Vancouver, we are increasingly facing some of the worst traffic congestion in Canada. The region’s mayors have developed a Transportation and Transit Plan to cut congestion; keep people, jobs and our economy moving, and accommodate a million more people expected here by 2040.

This spring, Metro Vancouver voters will have a say on these proposed transportation and transit improvements through a referendum—the first of its kind in Canada.

Carl Guardino is widely lauded as one of the most influential forces on transportation policy and funding in the San Francisco and Silicon Valley area, where such ballot measures are routine and have successfully funded major transportation improvements.

Carl will share lessons learned from a region that has been recognized for its progress and innovation, and how this experience might help engage and inform Metro Vancouver residents as we weigh the important decision before us.

 

About Carl Guardino

 

Carl Guardino is the President and CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, a public policy trade association that represents more than 385 of Silicon Valley’s most respected companies.

He also serves as the Chair of the California Transportation Commission, an independent public agency responsible for programming and allocating of funds for the construction of highway, passenger rail and transit improvements throughout California.

Guardino led efforts that resulted in $1.4 billion of funding for 19 key road and rail improvements and co-managed a traffic relief initiative that will generate $5.5 billion in local funds for transit improvements.

His experience in building consensus around transportation measures, successful managing of referenda and activating business leaders to promote sustainable transportation will make an excellent contribution to the current transportation dialogue in our region.

 

Event Details:

Monday, January 19, 7 to 9 p.m.

Simon Fraser University Harbour Centre

Room 1400, SFU Harbour Centre, 515 W Hastings Street, Vancouver

Reservations: Admission is free, but reservations are required. Reserve

This lecture will also be live webcast. Reservations are not required for the webcast.

 

For more info on this series check out the SFU page or read some our past posts. And remember, you can always post your questions about this series here as well as following the hashtag #movingthefuture on Twitter.

 

 

Delegations from around the globe travel to Vancouver to meet with TransLink

RiyadhDelegation

Left to Right: Guy Akester, Derrick Cheung, Ian Jarvis, Ibrahim Aleid, Saud Al-Saud, Ibrahim Alrajeh, Yosef Aljallal and Yosef AlBanumay.

 

Did you know that delegations from around the world, including Thailand, Sweden, Australia, Japan and Korea, visited TransLink in 2014 to learn about Metro Vancouver’s integrated transportation network?

Metro Vancouver’s transit system has an international reputation for excellence and TransLink’s ability to deliver transit-oriented development investment attracts interest near and far.

A delegation from Riyadh, the capital city of Saudi Arabia, was in Vancouver this fall. Five delegates met with TransLink’s real estate group, planning and infrastructure management teams, and the Transit Police.

Ibrahim Aleid, Director of Metropolitan Planning and Urban Design at the Riyadh Development Authority says that TransLink is well regarded globally for delivering an efficient and integrated transportation network that is shaping world class transit oriented communities.

“We are developing a transit system in Riyadh and we hope to learn from the success of Metro Vancouver in creating the necessary conditions to foster and promote highly innovative transit-oriented communities and developments.”

 

What is a transit-oriented development?

Transit-oriented developments enable people to drive less, and walk, cycle and take transit more; and therefore maximize the value of transit investments. TransLink works in collaboration with public and private sector partners to enable the Metro Vancouver region to realize the benefits of transit-oriented communities and foster transit-oriented development.

Since 2011, development near transit has grown exponentially. There are now 35 development projects in construction or planning stages—significantly more than the handful of projects that existed from 1986-2011.

 

Information sessions for Metrotown on Dec 3 and Commercial-Broadway on Dec 4

Hear what’s coming up at Metrotown Station and Commercial-Broadway Station!

Hear what’s coming up at Metrotown Station and Commercial-Broadway Station!

We’re inviting you to attend an open house to learn about the station design, construction plan and project timeline for the upgrades coming to Metrotown Station and Exchange and Commercial-Broadway Station.

Metrotown Station Open House

Date: December 3, 2014
Time: 2:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Location: Metrotown Station, east of escalators and stairs, street level

Commercial-Broadway Station Open House

Date: December 4, 2014
Time: 2:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Location: Commercial–Broadway Station, north stationhouse street level

Get involved online

Can’t make it to one of the sessions No problem! We will also have information and a feedback survey posted at translink.ca/metrotowntranslink.ca/commercialbroadway and translink.ca/joyce. Feedback will be accepted until December 15.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Missed it? Markus Moos and Gil Peñalosa’s Rethinking Transportation talks are now online!

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Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas, brought to you by TransLink in collaboration with the SFU City Program, was back at Simon Fraser University on Tuesday, September 16 and Wednesday, September 17!

Gil Peñalosa

Gil Peñalosa

Dr. Markus Moos

Dr. Markus Moos

Markus Moos, Assistant Professor, School of Planning at the University of Waterloo, spoke on The New Generation: Are Millennials Changing the Game? His talk looked at how Millennials’ values, preferences and priorities could affect your work, commute, home and community — now and in the future.

Internationally acclaimed “healthy cities” expert Gil Peñalosa‘s talk, Future Livability: Boast or Bust?, explored whether Metro Vancouver can maintain its “Livability Credibility” for the next 30 years

SFU Continuing Studies now has both talks archived on YouTube! Click here for more information about the talks and the speakers.

 

Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas – talks from Markus Moos and Gil Peñalosa

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Exciting news – Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas, brought to you by TransLink in collaboration with the SFU City Program, is back at Simon Fraser University!

Event Details on both talks:

Markus Moos

Date: Tuesday, September 16, 7 p.m.

Location: Room 1400, SFU Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings, Vancouver

Admission: Free, but reservations are required. Reserve

Live Webcast: http://creative-services.sfu.ca/broadcast/

 

Gil Peñalosa

Date: Wednesday, September 17, 7 p.m.

Location: Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, SFU, Woodwards Building, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver

Admission: Free, but reservations are required. Reserve

Live Webcast: http://creative-services.sfu.ca/broadcast/

Markus Moos, Assistant Professor, School of Planning at the University of Waterloo will be speaking on Tuesday, September 16, 7 p.m., at SFU Harbour Centre. The talk, The New Generation: Are Millennials Changing the Game?, will take a look at how Millennials’ values, preferences and priorities could affect your work, commute, home and community — now and in the future.

Internationally acclaimed “healthy cities” expert Gil Peñalosa will be speaking the following day – Wednesday, September 17, at SFU Woodward’s at 7 p.m. His talk is titled, Future Livability: Boast or Bust?, will explore whether Metro Vancouver can maintain its “Livability Credibility” for the next 30 years.

Admission is free for both talks, but reservations are required. Visit www.sfu.ca/rethinking-transportation to register. Unable to attend? Both talks will be available as a free webcast online at creative-services.sfu.ca/broadcast/.

You can tweet your questions and comments using the hashtag #movingthefuture.

Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas is a speakers’ series focused on key transportation issues and opportunities facing the Metro Vancouver region. The series will explore new perspectives on the movement of people and goods in cities with thought leaders, decision makers, and experts from across North America who have tackled some of the most pressing transportation challenges.

The New Generation: Are Millennials Changing the Game?

Dr. Markus Moos

Dr. Markus Moos

Millennials’ values, preferences and priorities could affect your work, commute, home and community – now and in the future.

The New York Times has mentioned “Millennials” 122 times between January and August 2014 on topics ranging from TV and pop music to travel and literature.  Why the interest?

Millennials, born between the early 80s and the new millennium, are a significant and influential demographic—outnumbering even the baby boomers. The roughly 9 million Millennials across Canada and over 500,000 here in Metro Vancouver think, communicate, travel and work differently. Understanding how they impact housing, transportation, jobs and communities is critical for planners, employers, real estate and technology developers, and anyone who interacts with this new wave of change-makers.

Far fewer Millennials have driver’s licences than previous generations, which is particularly relevant as we reach a critical juncture in transportation planning in our region with 1 million more people expected to join us by 2040.

Join Dr. Markus Moos, Assistant Professor in the School of Planning at the University of Waterloo to learn more about how Millennials are different from young adults in Metro Vancouver 20 to 30 years ago; how their housing and commuting decisions are different from their previous cohorts; and —perhaps most importantly—what this means for transportation and housing in Metro Vancouver and beyond.

About the Speaker

Dr. Markus Moos is a Registered Professional Planner and Assistant Professor in the School of Planning, Faculty of Environment at the University of Waterloo. Dr. Moos’ research is on the changing economy and social structure of cities. His most recent work has examined the factors shaping Canada’s housing markets, the changing characteristics of our suburbs, and the affordability, sustainability and equity implications of present-day urban change. Dr. Moos has published widely in book chapters and peer-reviewed articles in top-ranked international journals. He is currently co-editing the most recent edition of Canadian Cities in Transition—a compilation of chapters written by some of Canada’s top urban researchers. Dr. Moos holds an Early Researcher Award from the Province of Ontario for his research on young adults’ changing housing needs.

Future Livability: Boast or Bust?

Gil Peñalosa

Gil Peñalosa

Can Metro Vancouver maintain its “Livability Credibility” for the next 30 years?

The Metro Vancouver region is frequently cited among the world’s most livable.  Just this summer, Vancouver – and by extension much of our region – was cited by The Economist as the third most livable city in the world, with particular kudos for our current and near-term rapid transit connections through Burnaby, Coquitlam and Port Moody.

Can we maintain our frequently and broadly cited international livability credibility? With a million new residents, 600,000 new jobs and potentially 3 million more car trips per day in our region by 2040, how will we maintain the unique and treasured qualities we enjoy throughout Metro Vancouver?

Internationally acclaimed “healthy cities” expert Gil Peñalosa believes in the importance of mobility in planning healthy, sustainable cities – cities where people can walk, bike, and access transit to carry out their daily activities, no matter their age, ability, or social status.

As part of SFU’s Rethinking Transportation Speaker Series, Gil will share examples from around the world that show that transportation systems that put people first from the point of view of public health, environment, recreation, mobility, and economic development lead to sustainable, healthier, more vibrant and livable cities.

Join Gil Peñalosa of 8-80 Cities to learn more about what we can all do to protect the future livability of our local communities and the importance of investing in our transportation system so we can preserve our quality of life now and for generations to come.

About the Speaker:

Gil Peñalosa is passionate about cities for ALL people. Gil advises decision makers and community leaders on how to create vibrant cities and healthy communities for everyone regardless of social, economic, or ethnic background. His focus is the design and use of parks and streets as great public places, as well as sustainable mobility. Because of his unique blend of pragmatism and passion, Gil’s leadership and advice is sought out by many cities and organizations. As Executive Director of the Canadian non-profit organization 8-80 Cities for the past eight years, Gil has worked in over 150 different cities in all continents.

Pattullo Bridge Summer Weekend Closures

The Pattullo Bridge

The Pattullo Bridge

Due to maintenance and repairs, the Pattullo Bridge will be closed to all traffic (including bicycles and pedestrians) for three weekends this summer:

  • July 25-28
  • August 15-18
  • August 29-September 1

On the first weekend of closures, the bridge will close at 8 p.m. on Friday night and reopen at 3 a.m. on Monday morning. On the following weekends, the bridge will close at 9 p.m. on Friday night and re-open at 3 a.m. on Monday morning. 

Motorists should plan alternate routes to cross the Fraser River and transit customers should plan for longer travel times on the N19 and #321 during those weekends.
 
For more information, click here to see the press release or visihttp://www.translink.ca/pattullo.

Get involved in Phase 3 of the Northeast Sector Area Transit Plan

Northeast Sector Area Transit Plan

It’s your community, have your say!

 

Attention Buzzer readers…do you recall a few posts ago where we told you about Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the Northeast Sector Area Transit Plan? Well, Phase 3 begins today – June 16!

In Phase 1, you shared your thoughts on the key issues and opportunities for transit in your community. Then in Phase 2, you helped us shape the long-term transit vision in the Northeast Sector. Now we invite you to provide feedback on proposed changes that will help achieve the vision for the transit network in Anmore, Belcarra, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam and Port Moody.

To get involved, you can complete an online survey or drop by one of six community events to get more information. The survey will be available until July 14, 2014.

 

Thursday, June 19

Port Coquitlam Farmers Market

Leigh Square, Port Coquitlam

3:00 pm – 7:00 pm

 

Saturday, June 21

BC Highland Games & Scottish Festival

Percy Perry Stadium, Coquitlam

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

 

Sunday, June 29

Coquitlam Farmers Market

Dogwood Pavilion, Coquitlam

9:00 am – 1:00 pm

 

Sunday, June 22

Belcarra Day

4084 Bedwell Bay Rd, Belcarra

10:00 am – 2:00 pm

 

Coquitlam Centre Mall

2929 Barnet Highway, Coquitlam

11:00 am – 6:00 pm

 

Tuesday, July 1

Golden Spike Days Festival

Rocky Point Park, Port Moody

11:00 am – 8:00 pm

 

 

 

Service Optimization – 2014 Report is now available

2014 Service Optimization

The report is now available online!

Hey Buzzer readers, are you on transit right now? As you travel to your destination or think about travelling to your destination, ponder this: How can transit service continue to improve and better meet customer demand with the resources available?

Many transit authorities across North America, including Toronto, San FranciscoMemphis, and Nashville, are exploring ways to answer this challenge. Here at home, we continue to explore innovative ways to provide more service with the available resources. Since 2010, service optimization has played an important role in increasing the productivity of TransLink’s existing bus network. To date, more than 292,000 hours, or 6 per cent of total bus service hours in the region have been reallocated.

Back in February we told you about changes being proposed for routes in Burnaby, Delta, North Vancouver and Richmond as part of the 2014 Service Optimization Program. We listened and gathered your input on six proposed changes.  Based on your feedback and further technical analysis, TransLink will proceed with changes to the C15, C96, 116, 404 and 606/608 routes. TransLink will defer implementation of the proposed changes to the 49 while we continue to study alternative designs to better meet community needs.

The full report is now available.

 

Thank you again, to everyone who participated!

Congratulations to the #HappyCity contest winners

Thanks everyone for participating in the Happy City contest! Here are some of the photos that won the contest prizes:

We gave away 4 FareCards and some more prizes donated by TravelSmart, Modo, Vancouver Opera, MEC and Vancouver Attractions. We hope these prizes will help you enjoy our beautiful region even more!

 

Choosing the Happy City Lecture Recap

Charles Montgomery presenting at SFU Woodwards on March 26, 2014 Image by Borjana Slipicevic

Charles Montgomery presenting at SFU Woodwards on March 26, 2014
Image by Borjana Slipicevic

 

Hello Buzzer readers! I hope you made it to the lecture Choosing Happy City by Charles Montgomery or watched it via webcast. It was the third lecture in the series “Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas”. The lecture was streamed live and the video will be available shortly.

Stephen Rees built a another interesting Storify post of the tweets posted during the lecture. Again, he kindly allowed us to post it here and give our readers a better idea of the what the conversation was about. Kudos to everyone who tweeted during the lecture!

The next lecture is in May. More details to follow – stay tuned!