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Translink Buzzer Blog

Category: Planning for the Future

Service Optimization – 2014 Report is now available

2014 Service Optimization

The report is now available online!

Hey Buzzer readers, are you on transit right now? As you travel to your destination or think about travelling to your destination, ponder this: How can transit service continue to improve and better meet customer demand with the resources available?

Many transit authorities across North America, including Toronto, San FranciscoMemphis, and Nashville, are exploring ways to answer this challenge. Here at home, we continue to explore innovative ways to provide more service with the available resources. Since 2010, service optimization has played an important role in increasing the productivity of TransLink’s existing bus network. To date, more than 292,000 hours, or 6 per cent of total bus service hours in the region have been reallocated.

Back in February we told you about changes being proposed for routes in Burnaby, Delta, North Vancouver and Richmond as part of the 2014 Service Optimization Program. We listened and gathered your input on six proposed changes.  Based on your feedback and further technical analysis, TransLink will proceed with changes to the C15, C96, 116, 404 and 606/608 routes. TransLink will defer implementation of the proposed changes to the 49 while we continue to study alternative designs to better meet community needs.

The full report is now available.

 

Thank you again, to everyone who participated!

Congratulations to the #HappyCity contest winners

Thanks everyone for participating in the Happy City contest! Here are some of the photos that won the contest prizes:

We gave away 4 FareCards and some more prizes donated by TravelSmart, Modo, Vancouver Opera, MEC and Vancouver Attractions. We hope these prizes will help you enjoy our beautiful region even more!

 

Choosing the Happy City Lecture Recap

Charles Montgomery presenting at SFU Woodwards on March 26, 2014 Image by Borjana Slipicevic

Charles Montgomery presenting at SFU Woodwards on March 26, 2014
Image by Borjana Slipicevic

 

Hello Buzzer readers! I hope you made it to the lecture Choosing Happy City by Charles Montgomery or watched it via webcast. It was the third lecture in the series “Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas”. The lecture was streamed live and the video will be available shortly.

Stephen Rees built a another interesting Storify post of the tweets posted during the lecture. Again, he kindly allowed us to post it here and give our readers a better idea of the what the conversation was about. Kudos to everyone who tweeted during the lecture!

The next lecture is in May. More details to follow – stay tuned!

 

 

Choosing the Happy City: People, Part 3

Dr. Helena Swinkels

Dr. Helena Swinkels

Choosing the Happy City lecture is today at 7 p.m.

Our final interview before the lecture is with Dr. Helena Swinkels, Medical Health Officer with the Fraser Health Authority. Dr. Swinkels is responsible for healthy living and healthy communities for the region and she is Medical Health Officer for the City of Surrey. She has a keen interest in creating physical and social environments that make it easier to live a healthy life. She gets around by transit, walking or bicycling whenever she possibly can.

Dr. Swinkels is going to provide an introduction at the lecture later today. She has some great things to say about how the work of the health authorities is connected with cities, happiness and transportation. So, let’s begin.

What city in the Lower Mainland do you live in? What about work?

I live in Vancouver and work in Surrey.

What makes you happy about where you live or work?

I’ve always wanted to live in a neighbourhood that supports the healthy kind of life. So, I moved to a neighbourhood close to the Main Street SkyTrain station. Now, I can take transit to work, I don’t have to drive, my commute is shorter, and I can walk or cycle in and around my neighbourhood.

For me, it’s very important to live alongside SkyTrain line, because my mother is disabled and she always uses transit to get around.

How do you usually travel around your neighbourhood? How do you travel to work?

In my neighbourhood, you can get around by foot, bike or public transportation. When I travel to work, I almost always take SkyTrain. I did cycle from Surrey to home once and would love to do it again. It took me 2 hours, including a 15-minute stop to pick blackberries along the way. Next time, I’m taking my colleagues with me!

What’s your favourite thing about how you get around your neighbourhood?

I mostly walk and my favourite thing about it is that I run into my neighbours. This is an area for pedestrians and although there are cars there, they are mostly guests.

You speak often about the survey “My Health My Community”. What is that about?

Health stems from where you live, work and play. Recognizing the need for better data about what produces health at local level, the Fraser Health, VCH and UBC created MHMC. This survey will help us work with our community to better promote health. Our aim is to provide communities with actionable health-related data about specific neighbourhoods. The survey collects data about perception of health, stress, lifestyle questions, health care access, and transportation.

The better we understand the relationship between our cities, our health, and our experiences, the better equipped we’ll all be to design cities that are happier, healthier, and more resilient and that will offer a choice on how to travel and how to live. I encourage everyone to go to myhealthmycommunity.org to fill out the survey.

You’ll introduce Charles Montgomery at the lecture today. How is the “happy city” concept connected with your work and lifestyle?

It’s a very important topic.  I am particularly interested in how urban form and the transportation system can support health, happiness and meaningful choice in areas that have been built in the era of the car.  We know that our ‘suburbs’ are doing some things right. There are compelling reasons to develop denser urban areas in our cities and towns, large and small, suburban and rural – but in doing so, we have to make sure these are built or retrofitted with their residents’ health and happiness in mind.

Also, Charles Montgomery has done a masterful job telling diverse stories in his book. I love good stories!

Finally, what’s the link between health, transportation and happiness?

Most people don’t think of transportation as a health issue but it is hugely important for health.   Physical activity you get, amount of air pollution, a number of injuries and social connectedness – these are all greatly affected by transportation. It’s about how we design the cities but also how people get around.

Choosing the Happy City: People, Part 2

Image by Chris Brayshaw

Image by Chris Brayshaw

The lecture Choosing the Happy City is tomorrow and I continue to interview interesting people in our region about what the ‘happy city’ means to them.

Today, I spoke with Chris Brayshaw, an independent bookseller. Chris started Pulpfiction Books on Main Street in Vancouver in 2000 and later added two more stores, one on Broadway Street and one on Commercial Drive.  His stores offer a combination of used and new books to ensure there is something for everyone’s taste.

What city in the Lower Mainland do you live in?

Vancouver.

What makes you happy about where you live?

The number of smallish, owner-operated businesses around.  The non-corporate quality of the streetscape, which is perfectly scaled to walking, and not to travel by car.

How do you usually travel around your neighbourhood?

By foot or trolleybus.

What’s your favourite thing about how you get around your neighbourhood?

Green parks seamlessly integrated into the grid of the neighborhood, perfect for cutting through.

How do you usually travel around your city?

By foot or trolleybus. Less often by Skytrain. I like transit lines with three to five minute service.

What do you like most about your work?

I opened Pulpfiction Books, Vancouver’s largest independent new & used bookstore, in June 2000. It’s still the best poorly-paying job I’ve ever had.

I hope you enjoyed this post. Don’t forget, there’s still time to enter the Happy City contest to win some great prizes.  Apart from the Buzzer, this contest is run by the Vancity BuzzThe Thirties Grind and Surrey604.  The lecture Choosing Happy City is sold out but you can watch it live via webcast; simply click on the webcast link here at 7 p.m. on March 26.

 

 

Choosing the Happy City: People

Living in the #happycity means hopping on the train for an impromptu sunset seawall stroll after dinner.  Photo by Chris Bruntlett (@cbruntlett)

Living in the #happycity means hopping on the train for an impromptu sunset seawall stroll after dinner.
Photo by Chris Bruntlett (@cbruntlett)

 

 

The lecture Choosing the Happy City is just around the corner and it’s a good time to explore different perspectives on the connection between neighbourhoods and the happiness of people who reside in them. A few days ago, I posted the interview with Charles Montgomery – I hope you enjoyed it.

Today, I had a pleasure to speak with Chris  Bruntlett, a residential designer, writer, photographer, and bike enthusiast. During the day, Chris works as a residential designer, designing single family homes, duplexes and laneway houses in the City of Vancouver.

Outside of the office, he spends a great deal of his evenings and weekends encouraging people to get on a bicycle through writing, photography, public speaking, and filmmaking. If you read posts about city cycling in the Spacing, Vancouver Is Awesome, Vancity Buzz, Hush, or Momentum Magazine, the chances are that you came across Chris’ work.

 

What city in the Lower Mainland do you live in?

Our family of four lives in the Grandview-Woodlands neighbourhood of Vancouver, just a couple of blocks from the Commercial-Broadway Skytrain station, and have done so for five years now.

What makes you happy about where you live?

We love having the freedom to choose how we’re getting somewhere, dependent on the nature of the trip we’re taking. Sometimes it’s walking. Sometimes it’s cycling. Other times it’s by bus or Skytrain. And once in a while, we’ll borrow a car from Modo or Car2Go.

How do you usually travel around your neighbourhood?

More often than not, we get around Grandview-Woodlands by foot or bicycle. We are fortunate enough to have the traffic-calmed 10th Avenue, Lakewood, and Mosaic Bikeways at our disposal, although running errands along Commercial Drive can be problematic. We’re certainly hoping the long-term plan to create safe, comfortable space for cycling on The Drive happens sooner rather than later.

What’s your favourite thing about how you get around your neighbourhood?

Moving at a slower pace allows us to have an intimate, unfiltered, first-hand connection to our neighbourhood, its shopfronts, merchants, houses, parks, and neighbours we may run into along the way. Our kids know the people and places in their community like the backs of their hands.

How do you usually travel around your city?

When it comes to longer distances, we’ll usually take a combination of Skytrain and/or bus, although our kids have been known to amaze us with their ability to ride their bikes long distances. We absolutely love cycling on the seawall as a family, with its stunning views of the ocean, mountains, and glass towers; and can sometimes ride over 20 kilometres in a single day!

What do you like about travelling around your city?

Getting around without a car transforms all of our travel time into family time. Walking, cycling, or riding the bus provides ample opportunity to relax, hold hands, make eye contact, and chat about any number of topics, big or small.

You’re often involved in projects that focus on city cycling as part of everyday life. What are you currently working on?

I recently produced a series of six short films which intimately profile a number of Vancouverites who use a bicycle to get around. We just wrapped up the first series (http://www.youtube.com/vancyclechic), which were incredibly well received and publicized; and have started pre-production on a second series, to be shot and released in 2014.

You recently wrote a review of the book “Happy City” for Vancouver is Awesome. Anything you want to mention from the book?

As Charles Montgomery points out, the greener, happier and resilient city all occupy the same place. In my opinion, Vancouver should be aiming to be the “World’s Happiest City”, and framing the (sometimes heated) discussions around what we have to gain – rather than give up – in order to live sustainably.

 

I hope you enjoyed this post. Don’t forget, there’s still time to enter the Happy City contest to win some great prizes.  Apart from the Buzzer, this contest is run by the Vancity Buzz, The Thirties Grind and Surrey604.  The lecture Choosing Happy City is sold out but you can watch it live via webcast; simply click on the webcast link here at 7 pm on March 26.

 

Choosing the Happy City: Q & A with Charles Montgomery

Author Charles Montgomery at Madison Square Park, Flatiron District, Manhattan                                                              Photo courtesy Lee Satkowski

Author Charles Montgomery at Madison Square Park, Flatiron District, Manhattan
Photo courtesy Lee Satkowski

As we’re getting closer to the lecture Choosing the Happy City on March 26 at SFU Woodwards, I had a pleasure to talk to Charles Montgomery, the author of the book Happy City and the speaker at the lecture.  Charles is a passionate and engaging speaker, and here he explains why he dedicated five years of  life to find out how cities can improve happiness of people who live in them.

What inspired you to write the Happy City? 

It started with a bike ride through Bogota, Colombia, chasing the mayor who had used that unhappy city as a testing ground for his ideas on happiness. Enrique Peñalosa insisted that by transforming the form and systems of his impoverished and violent city, he had made citizens happier.

So, the bike ride through Bogota led to you start your five-year long exploration of happiness and cities?

That experience in Bogota posited a question; could a city really be redesigned to build happiness?

It was a thrilling idea, but I was skeptical. So, I set out to test it against science and evidence from other cities. The quest led me to the doorsteps of neuroscientists, psychologists, behavioral economists and activists, as well as sites of remarkable urban transformation around the world.

What connection between urban design and happiness did you find?

To paraphrase Winston Churchill, we shape our cities, and then they shape us. Buildings, roads and other city systems alter how we move, where we pause, how much spare time and money we have, and how we interact with and regard other people.

Good relationships, physical health, and social trust—all of these are key ingredients of happiness. By understanding these effects, we can reconfigure our cities and our lives to be healthier, happier and more resilient.

How can transportation help build happy cities?

We know that social relationships are the most powerful ingredient of happiness. So it’s crucial that we build systems that help us connect with other people in the city easily–and get us home in time for dinner with the people we love. Relying only on private cars won’t achieve that.

What’s the place that make you happy and why?

My happy place? Granville and Georgia at rush hour. The tide of people pouring out of the Canada Line station give the corner a thrilling sense of life and possibility.

What can regular people do to build urban happiness?

We need to understand the effect that city systems have on our emotions and behavior. We need to demand cities that reward us rather than punishing us for making healthy, more efficient choices.

Do you have examples?

In Davis, California a couple convinced all their neighbors to tear down their backyard fences so they could all enjoy a giant shared garden—and ended up with a finely-tunable device for sociability.

In Brooklyn, a man angered by honking horns outside his window went from throwing eggs at drivers to altering the way his city’s traffic lights worked. His work launched a movement that would lead to the renovation of the entire city, and pedestrianisation of Times Square.

None of them were thinking about the science of happiness. But they proved that we all have the right and the power to fix our cities.

What about the rest of us? What about the people who don’t have aspirations to change the system?

You can boost your happiness just by changing your relationship with the urban system. For some people, this means changing where you live, or how you move. For others, the answer lies in understanding the city’s invisible emotional systems, and consciously altering your response to them. I hope Happy City will help.

To hear more about the Happy City, come to the lecture on March 26. Admission is FREE but you have to register. RSVP here.

Did you know that you can enter a Happy City contest to win some great prizes? Spoiler alert: all it takes is a selfie! Check it out here.

 

 

 

Contest: Choosing the happy city

Show us your Happy City!

Show us your Happy City!

Hello Buzzer readers! We have a new contest for you and it’s all about cities and happiness. Before participating, let’s first consider a few questions.

Do we live in neighbourhoods that make us happy? Can we design our cities and transportation systems to maximize happiness?

In his new book, Happy City, Vancouver-based author Charles Montgomery shows how urban systems, including transportation, impact our lives and shape our emotions and behaviour in ways most of us never recognize.

How about you? Is there a place in your community that makes you happy? Or a place that makes your neighbourhood and community more connected and complete? Is it a neighbourhood café where ‘everybody knows your name’, a corner store, a park, a busy street, or is it a way of moving around to get where you need to be?

At TransLink, we are exploring the role of transportation in building a happy city.

Join the conversation at #happycity. Here’s what you need to do:

  • Take a ‘selfie’ picture at the place in your city or community that makes you happy.
  • Tweet your photo to @TransLink and with the hashtag #happycity. You can add a comment explaining the image and hashtags #selfie and/or #selfienation.
  • Post your photo on Instagram with the hashtag #happycity. Our Instagram page is TransLinkBC.
  • Come to the lecture Choosing the Happy City by Charles Montgomery on March 26 at 7 pm at SFU Woodwards to claim your prize and learn more about the Happy City. RSVP is mandatory.

By participating in this contest, you can win one of the following prizes:

  • One of four FareCards.
  • One TravelSmart Travel gift pack $50 with gift card to MEC and TravelSmart Swag.
  • Two tickets to Don Carlo opera at the Queen Elizabeth Theater.
  • One free yearly membership and $50 car sharing credit from MODO.

Before you enter, please read the contest rules and conditions.

Photos may be used in the print Buzzer, the Buzzer blog, presentation during the Choosing the Happy City lecture, tweeted by @TransLink and posted on the TransLink Facebook and Instagram page.

Images and posts tagged #happycity will be shared on the Buzzer blog. Join us in this conversation.

My happy place!

 

Here’s my #selfie. I took it last year in North Vancouver, with the Coal Harbour in the background. This is the view I enjoy every morning while taking the Seabus to work. Pretty cool, right?

Rethinking Transportation with Andrew Coyne

Andrew Coyne speaking at SFU Woodwards

Andrew Coyne speaking at SFU Woodwards

Hello Buzzer readers! I hope you had a chance to attend the second lecture in the series “Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas” that took place on Tuesday, February 26 at SFU Woodwards. The lecture, Easing Congestion in Metro Vancouver: Prices without Subsidies, by Andrew Coyne, was streamed live and the video will be available shortly – I’ll keep you posted.

The lecture generated a very interesting conversation about mobility pricing. Stephen Rees built a storify of the tweets posted during and about the lecture. He was very kind to let us post it here to give our readers a better idea of the what the conversation was about. Kudos to everyone who tweeted during the lecture!

The next lecture is on March 26, 2014. Check here for more info.

Transportation Commissioner approves changes to YVR AddFare

Ticket vending machines at YVR.

Ticket vending machines at YVR.

I have some news for riders who buy single fare tickets from Canada Line Stations on Sea Island (YVR-Airport, Sea Island Centre, Templeton).

The Regional Transportation Commissioner has approved a fare change that means riders starting trips from Sea Island traveling to Bridgeport Station and beyond using single fares purchased with Compass Card Stored Value and DayPasses sold on Sea Island will also pay the five dollar AddFare, just like customers who pay cash today.

For monthly pass holders and other product passes like BC Bus Pass, there is no change. These riders will continue to enjoy the AddFare exemption that they have today, as will Sea Island employees and Burkeville residents. Additionally, like today, all customers traveling within Sea Island, including those who pay cash will not pay an additional fare.

For specific on this, you’ll want to read the official release. For info on stored value and more about Compass Card, AskCompass.ca is a great resource.

This change will come into effect later this year as customers transition to Compass. It is designed to ensure we continue to meet our funding obligations and provide a viable transit system for all our riders and users of TransLink assets.

As many of you know, FareSavers will be phased out once Compass has fully transitioned for all customers. However, with Compass, many people who currently use cash will switch to Compass Stored Value, which offers a 14 per cent savings. Monthly passes, stored value or a DayPass can all be kept on your Compass Card.

Why the change?

In 2009, as part of TransLink’s 10-year funding stabilization plan, the Mayors’ Council approved the YVR AddFare to close a gap in funding the capital costs of the Canada Line. Customers paying with cash to travel from the airport and other Sea Island stations to points East have been paying the $5 AddFare ever since.

The AddFare was meant to apply to all short-term trips (excluding Monthly or DayPasses) to and from Sea Island; however, at the time, the Regional Transportation Commissioner approved the fare increase only for cash fares. With the ongoing transition to Compass, many customers will shift from cash to the convenience of Compass. With this change, we’ll begin applying the AddFare to all short-term trips as originally planned.

 

 

Easing Congestion in Metro Vancouver: Prices without Subsidies, lecture by Andrew Coyne

The second installment of Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas is Feb 25, 2014!

The second installment of Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas is Feb 25, 2014!

Hello Buzzer readers. The speaker series Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas continues this month with a lecture by Andrew Coyne on February 25, 2014. Coyne is the weekly columnist for the National Post, member of the CBC, The Nathional’s At Issue Panel, and the former national editor of Maclean’s magazine known for his insightful and provocative commentary on political and economic issues.

Coyne’s lecture, Easing Congestion in Metro Vancouver: Prices without Subsidies, will address pricing of roads and transit – a timely issue in Metro Vancouver and other metropolitan areas grappling with the effects of growing congestion. He has written extensively about road pricing as a possible answer to congestion including MacLean’s Magazine.

Coyne takes an approach that pricing road use is the only effective way to induce people to drive less. As road use is at present rationed by time rather than money, other methods such as wider roads, carpooling, synchronized lights, etc. end up inducing people to drive more, since they reduce the time-price of using the roads.

The lecture will take place on February 25 at 7 pm at Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts (at SFU Woodwards), 149 West Hastings, Vancouver. The admission for the lecture is free, but reservations are required. RSVP or sign up for the webcast here.

This is the second lecture in the series Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas. The first lecture featured Anne Golden, Chair of the Ontario Transit Investment Strategy Advisory Panel, who spoke about her work with the Transit Panel on making recommendations on transit funding for the Greater Toronto and Hamilton area. If you missed the lecture, you can still check out the video here.

With nearly 45,000 people moving to Metro Vancouver every year, the conversation about how we travel in our region becomes increasingly important. The lectures will continue throughout 2014 and the idea is to explore new perspectives on the movement of people and goods in cities, with thought leaders, decision makers, and experts from across North America.

What do you think are the most important, transportation-related, topics we should talk about? Let us know in the comments below.

Do you know someone who would be interested in attending this lecture? Feel free to share this post with your colleagues and friends. For Twitter mentions, the hashtag for the lecture is #movingthefuture.

Storify: Rethinking Transportation lecture #1

Hello Buzzer readers! I hope you had a chance to attend the first lecture yesterday in the series “Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas” that took place last night at SFU Woodwards. The lecture, Breaking the Political Gridlock to Address the Transportation Challenge: Lessons Learned from the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, by Dr. Anne Golden, was streamed live and the video will be available shortly – I’ll keep you posted. The lecture generated great conversation about transportation and a great part of it is reflected in the tweets in this storify.

The next lecture is on Feb 25, 2014. Check this link for more info.

Breaking the Political Gridlock to Address the Transportation Challenge: Lessons Learned from the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, by Dr. Anne Golden on January 28 was the first lecture in the new series of lectures on transportation. The next lecture is on Feb 25. Info: http://bit.ly/Khlbte.


Introducing the new Chair of the TransLink Board for 2014 – Marcella Szel

I sat down with Marcella Szel, the new Chair of the TransLink Board recently and found out some interesting info about her background. Marcella was great to speak with and as you’ll learn from watching this video, Marcella has been involved with moving goods and people for a number of years. For more info about Marcella, you’ll want to read her bio in the Board of Directors section of the TransLink website.

Marcella is a busy person who’s involved with a number of boards and initiatives. But that doesn’t mean she’s too busy to answer your pertinent questions about her work and the Board. So, fire away, and I’ll do my best to have comments answered in a day or two.

Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas

 

Lecture Series Photo_SkyTrain-small

 

Hello Buzzer readers, if you are looking to join an interesting conversation about transportation, this is the event for you.

 

Breaking the Political Gridlock to Address the Transportation Challenge: Lessons Learned from the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, lecture by Dr. Anne Golden will address many important issues facing Metro Vancouver regional transportation.

The lecture takes place on January 28 at 7 pm at Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts (at SFU Woodwards), 149 West Hastings, Vancouver. Admission is free, but reservations are required. RSVP here.

Dr. Golden brings the unique and relevant experience of leading the Transit Investment Strategy and Advisory Panel in its recent work on identifying a viable transit investment strategy for the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area. She will describe the political and financial context that was blocking progress in Toronto, and set out Making the Move, the plan that she and her 12 panel members hope will break the political and transportation gridlock.

Like Metro Vancouver, which will add one million new residents  over the next 30 years, the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area is projected to see its population increase by 40 per cent in the next 20 years. Both Metro Vancouver and Toronto are seeking ways to give their residents new transportation choices, ease congestion, better connect people with jobs, and enable people to travel efficiently in all directions.

This is the first lecture in the speakers’ series ‘Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas’. The series, focused on key transportation issues and opportunities facing the Metro Vancouver region, will explore new perspectives on the movement of people and goods in cities with thought leaders, decision makers, and experts from across North America who have tackled some of the most pressing transportation challenges.

For more information and to RSVP, visit the lecture page.

Do you know someone who would be interested in attending this lecture? Feel free to share the lecture information with your colleagues and friends or post it on your social media channels. Help us spread the word about this important conversation! For Twitter mentions, the hashtag for the lecture is #sfucity.

Poll: How can we best communicate with you in 2014?

Tell us how you want us to communicate with you.

Tell us how you want us to communicate with you

It’s a new year and time to start fresh. When I look ahead to what’s on TransLink’s to do list this year, saying it’s a busy year is an understatement.

For one thing, Compass Card integration to the entire system will be in full swing in 2014. If fundamentally changing how people use transit in Metro Vancouver wasn’t enough, we’re also continuing to upgrade our Expo Line stations, rolling out more service optimization to best use the resources we have and change some schedules during our four annual service changes. Those are just a few items that TransLink needs to tackle this year and communicate to you our customers.

In an effort to make sure we’re doing all we can to inform you the customer about the above items as well as service disruptions and other factors that affect the movement of people and goods in Metro Vancouver, we’d like to know how you would like TransLink to communicate with you so that you feel informed.

There are 1.2 million transit trips on our system every day. We know you rely on our transit system to get to work, school, medical centers, friends and family. So, we want to make sure you have the information you need to get to where you need to go quickly, efficiently and safely.

Below is poll we’d love for you to take, share with your family, friends, colleagues and whomever else you think would benefit from hearing from us. We’ll use these poll results and any comments you leave to help us administer our communications resources more effectively.

When considering the options, think of your typical commuting day. Where are you and what are you doing if there is a service delay on a bus, SkyTrain or TransLink operated road or bridge? How do you usually find out about TransLink and the services we provide? We’re excited to read you answers!

How can we best communicate with you in 2014? (note: you can select up to three answers)

  • Through posts and tweets (69%, 100 Votes)
  • Posters, ads on the system (48%, 69 Votes)
  • In person help at stations and stops (43%, 62 Votes)
  • Through journalists and media reports (37%, 53 Votes)
  • Other (9%, 13 Votes)

Total Voters: 145

Some of the bigger projects in 2014 we want to communicate to our users

Some of the bigger projects in 2014 we want to communicate to our users