ALERT! More info
Translink Buzzer Blog

Category: Public Art

Capturing Art on Public Transit – 2017 Capture Photography Festival

We recently had the pleasure of catching up with British Mexican photographer Alinka EcheverrÍa, a featured artist in the 2017 Capture Photography Festival.

The Capture Photography Festival is an annual not-for-profit festival that strives to nurture emerging talent, engage community and spark public dialogue about photography as an art form and a vessel for communication.

This year, Capture has once again partnered with TransLink, this time on an art installation on the SkyTrain system.

This series titled Nicephora, is installed at Stadium–Chinatown Skytrain Station and can be viewed until 2018.

Alinka Echeverria
Precession of the Feminine
(2015), which is part of the larger series of works entitled Nicephora, was born during EcheverrÍa’s BMW Residency program at the Musée Nicéphore Niépce in France, a museum named after Nicéphore Niépce, the inventor of photography.

Capture Photography Festival
The Capture Photography Festival runs from April 1 – 28, 2017.

For more information, head to capturephotofest.com
Be sociable! Check out Capture’s Facebook and Instagram.

Stadium–Chinatown Station hosts Capture Photography Festival exhibit

Capture Photography Festival installation
You may have noticed some work at the third track at Stadium–Chinatown Station the past few days and now, you’ll see a lovely new art installation in this space!

What is art? Are we art? Is art, art? – Lisa Turtle

What’s going on?

TransLink is teaming up with the Capture Photography Festival running from April 1 to 28 and installing a public art piece on our SkyTrain system.

Public art is a key element to creating a welcoming environment, encourages community connections and encourages gathering places which help reduce crime and vandalism.

This temporary installation is called Precession of the Feminine by Alinka Echeverría and will be available for all to enjoy at Stadium–Chinatown for the next year.

A little more about the art

ALINKA ECHEVERRÍA, PRECESSION OF THE FEMININE, 2015

With her combined training in photography and social anthropology, Alinka Echeverría weaves critical questions of visual representation through her work. Precession of the Feminine (2015), which is part of a larger series of works entitled Nicephora, was created while she was completing the BMW Residency at the French Musée Nicéphore Niépce, named after the inventor of photography.

Inspired by Nicéphore’s biography, and the histories of ceramics and photography, Echeverría fuses blown-up images of women from the museum’s archive with ceramic vases in three-dimensional digital simulations.

Using the form of the vase as a metaphor for our understanding of the feminine, the artist invites us to see that which is invisible with our bare eyes – the underlying photographic and printing techniques behind the image itself.  The medium is the message (Marshall McLuhan 1972) and in this series the vase is the vessel through which to reflect on this fragile construction of the female image.

In this way, the works subtly reveal how economic and cultural power are linked to photography as an artistic and documentary medium, and have been carried forward through largely invisible codes and techniques, thus becoming normalized and entering our collective unconsciousness.

A precession is a change in an object’s orientation or rotation around an axis. In this work, Echeverría aims to present the precession of representations of femininity. Echeverría quietly questions the perception of photography as a marker of truth, while examining more broadly the way that codes and symbols of femininity are constructed and understood.

Keep your eyes peeled today for the installed exhibit at Stadium–Chinatown Station!

Author: Adrienne Coling

Children bring the feeling of home to Joyce–Collingwood Station

IMG_20160627_175030

Welcome home

Home. It’s a word we use all the time and a luxury we often take for granted.

When your home is destroyed and you are forced to leave, where does home become?

For nearly 1,700 government-assisted Syrian refugees arriving since November, B.C. has become their new home. Many of these refugees are part of families that have settled right here in Metro Vancouver with almost half of them living in Surrey.

When the construction hoarding needed to be put up at Joyce–Collingwood Station for upgrade work, a mural project was created to expand and strengthen the sense of community of our region and it turned out to be a great opportunity to include the children of these affected families!

The project was a partnership between TransLink, Collingwood Neighbourhood House and the City of Vancouver’s Mural Program.

The imagery throughout the mural was created by neighbourhood kids through lively and fun workshops of brainstorming, drawing and painting, then transferred to the overall design by the lead artists, Kim Villagante and Aly de la Cruz Yip.

It was the artists’ job to organize and arrange the variety of sketches and concepts they received during the workshops.

The concept of home, place and the natural environment were themes that came up a lot during their time with the kids, so the artists ran with that for the finalized piece.

It wasn’t just the youth involved who took something special away from this experience.

“In my experience as a community arts facilitator, I have walked away with memories of the conversations, discussions and the relationships that were built behind the scenes,” said Kim Villagante. “The symbol of the mural is powerful because it is a public and visual reminder on a wall of the community that exists behind it.”

Aly believes art can heal, support and nurture growth within communities and enjoys being a part of that process.

“Art is medicine. I have experienced firsthand the powerful role art can play in the processing of trauma and healing of communities,” said de la Cruz Yip. “I love being a grounding presence to youth; present, engaged and ready to step in with advice or encouragement whenever needed.”

You can look at some photos of the project below:

Be sure to see this wonderful, welcoming piece of community art in person outside the East stationhouse at Joyce–Collingwood Station.

Author: Adrienne Coling