ALERT! More info
Translink Buzzer Blog

Category: State of the System

Transit tips to manage inclement weather

Transit tips to manage inclement weather

We might be getting snow soon in Metro Vancouver sometime soon. Here are some transit travel tips that can help make your ride more comfortable for you and your fellow commuters.

Know before you go.
If there’s snow or ice ensure you plan ahead with Trip Planner or  m.translink.ca on your mobile device, and make sure to allow yourself extra commuting time.

Sign up for transit alerts so you’ll be the first to know if there are changes in the transit schedule.

Follow our customer information team on Twitter (@translink), Facebook (TransLink) and save their number (604) 953-3333 on your mobile device.

Step Carefully

Snowy floors can become slippery floors. Where possible, kick the snow from your shoes before getting on the your chosen mode of transit. Use handrails and please be courteous to other passengers and don’t put your feet up on open seats.

Dress Warmly

While your ride will be climate controlled, we can’t control the temperature outside of our vehicles. Make sure that you’re dressed warmly for your trip to and from your stop.

Be Courteous

Please remember that transit is a popular choice on snowy days, therefore you may see more people out than usual. Always use your common transit sense to ensure a comfortable ride for everyone.

 

We’re doing our part too! Here’s what we do on our end to ensure service runs smoothly during inclement weather:

Consistent monitoring

Winter weather forecasting means more staff, buses and SkyTrains can be quickly deployed to keep riders moving.

Slow and steady

During adverse weather, operators are instructed to drive slower and with added caution to keep riders safe. Additionally, operators have a snow/ice switch which gives the bus tires better traction in the snow.

Play it safe

If a street is not plowed, operators may refrain from pulling into bus stops to avoid getting stuck. In these cases, operators will stop in an area that is safe and accessible for riders.

Trolley de-icer trucks will deploy spraying the entire trolley overhead system if there is a forecast risk of frost or ice. SkyTrain power rail and collector shoes on the trains will be de-iced as well as de-icing stations will be set up in covered areas and tunnels to prevent ice and snow compacts on the trains. Measures are also taken to make sure switches are protected from freezing.

During times of overnight snow, SkyTrain will run throughout the night to keep tracks clear.

If needed, articulated buses will be replaced by traditional buses as they’re more agile in and better equipped to handle hills or on streets that have poor conditions.

Canada Line trains are equipped with new breaking modes for train cars, similar to the ABS systems you find on some vehicles.

What are your tried and true snowy weather commuting tips?

SkyTrain Change is a comin’! Are you ready for October 22nd?

Change can be hard, but the good news is, it doesn’t have to be! We’ve got everything you need to help you on your way on October 22nd, and beyond!

If you haven’t yet heard, on October 22nd, 2016 the way you ride SkyTrain may be changing. In advance of the Evergreen Extension opening later this year, the operating pattern of the SkyTrain network will be different than what you’ve become accustomed to. Arguably, the biggest change in the operating pattern will take place at Lougheed Town Centre Station and Production Way – University Station.

Is Lougheed Town Centre Station part of your commute? Our friends in wayfinding have created this visual to help you understand what to expect come October 22nd.

October 22nd SkyTrain Pattern Changes

Are you a Production Way – University Station regular? Here’s how the upcoming October 22nd change may affect your SkyTrain commute.

October 22nd SkyTrain Pattern Changes

Still have questions? Check out our Facebook Livestream with Ian Fisher, outlining all of the changes.

For more information on the operating pattern,
visit translink.ca/skytrainchanges.

You can also check out our live streams on Facebook and Periscope!

And one more time — the key points of the change that may impact you are summarized below:

New operating pattern – October 22nd:

o The Expo Line will now have two branches.

  • One route will continue to travel between Waterfront and King George stations.
  • A second Expo Line route will run between Waterfront and Production Way–University stations.

o The Millennium Line will no longer travel to/from Waterfront Station. Instead, it will
now run between VCC–Clark and Lougheed Stations.

Transfer points:

You will be able to transfer between the Millennium and Expo lines at three places:

o Commercial–Broadway Station
o Lougheed Town Centre Station
o Production Way–University Station

Please note: You will no longer be able to transfer to or from the Millennium Line at Columbia Station or Waterfront Station.

Author: Sarah Kertcher

TransLink prepares for stormy weather

skytrain3
Storms, they are a-brewin’!

As always, TransLink’s top priority is to ensure the safety of our customers and employees. So, in preparation for the inclement weather set to hit our region over the next few days, we are taking a number of steps.

Our Emergency Management group is participating in Emergency Management BC and Environment Canada conference calls to stay apprised of the forecast and expected outcomes as well as communicating within the organization to ensure necessary preparations are made.

Bus

Tree branches falling into our trolley overhead wires can be an issue during high-wind conditions, so we are checking known risk locations to prepare.

We also sometimes face road debris, which can result in detours for our bus service. Transit Supervisors and other support staff out on the road, such as Transit Security, in order to proactively identify such problem areas and communicate them out. Once identified, we can react quickly by contacting the municipality responsible for clearing the trees or debris.

SkyTrain

In case of high winds, SkyTrain service over the SkyBridge between New Westminster and Surrey may operate at reduced speeds.

If wind speeds exceed 100 kph, service could be temporarily suspended.

We’ve also proactively reached out to construction projects adjacent to SkyTrain to ensure items are properly secured, to prevent anything being blown onto the tracks.

Here’s what you can do to prepare yourself:

  • Sign up for Transit Alerts so we can let you know if there are any service issues or changes
  • Follow our fabulous Customer Information team @TransLink on Twitter or phone 604-953-3333.
  • Plan ahead with our Trip Planner and give yourself extra time on your commute
  • Be aware! More people than usual tend to take transit during nasty weather – common transit courtesy applies even more on days like these!
  • Be visible! A bus operator has a lot to be aware of in AND outside of the bus. Make yourself visible to them! Wear bright, reflective clothing and stand close to the bus stop poll.
  • Be patient! Traffic lights may not be working properly that could cause detours for buses, same goes for debris on routes.

We will continue to monitor the weather and get the word out to all customers if there are any service impacts. Until then, stay safe, stay dry and happy transiting!

Author: Adrienne Coling

A first look at the Evergreen Extension of the Millennium SkyTrain Line

Burquitlam Station

Burquitlam Station

The extension to the Millennium SkyTrain Line is going to connect the Metro Vancouver region like never before.

That was my biggest takeaway from tagging along on a quick tour for elected officials of a couple of soon-to-be-opened new stations on the SkyTrain system yesterday morning.

Amidst construction crews still busily buildings the six new stations and (along with Lougheed Town Centre) that make up the Evergreen Extension of the M-Line, I was able to take the odd photo and ask those along for the ride what they thought of it all.

The stations have a similar feel to some of the SkyTrain stations that have either recently been renovated or are in the midst of a facelift like Main Street-Science World and Metrotown respectively. They’re open in terms of their layout, have a lot of glass and include some beautiful public art that gives each stop on the line its own feel.

The Millennium Line will have a lot more bends than it does today and the longest tunnel in our system when it opens before Christmas this year!

“We’ve been waiting a long time. This will change our community,” Richard Stewart, Mayor of the City of Coquitlam told me. What the extension will do to improve livability, not only for the Tri-Cities, but for the region itself, is what many of the officials told me.

What struck me the most about the extension is how much more of the region this extension will give riders access to. Having lived in Vancouver for a number of years, I’ve only had glimpses of Coquitlam and the surrounding areas as I’ve driven to specific locations. With this extension, I know I’ll be exploring all that this section of the region has to offer since it’s simply a SkyTrain trip away.

As the final touches are put on the extension and we gear up for the SkyTrain pattern change (happening Oct 22nd) in advance of the opening, you’ll want to get yourself acquainted with how you too may make the trip to the Coquitlam area and beyond. With this new addition to the SkyTrain line, it’s not so far away.

Author: Robert Willis

My day with Mika: Understanding accessible transit

DSC_0037

Mika waiting for the bus on Main St.

This past spring I had the immense pleasure of tagging along on a filming request on our system and spent the afternoon with Kaz and Mika who wanted to showcase the accessibility of our system for a Japanese audience.

Kaz owns Motion Pla-net Productions that often produces work for NHK, Japan’s National public broadcasting organization.

Mika is a lovely woman who lives in downtown Vancouver and takes transit all the time in her fabulous pink wheelchair.

We spent the afternoon riding the bus and SkyTrain while Mika explained in Japanese to the camera all of the fittings and equipment TransLink offers on the system for those who need it.

Part of the filming also included speaking with TransLink’s Access Transit Coordinator, Sarah Chung about why TransLink has been so proactive in promoting the accessibility of transit services for people with disabilities.

“Public transit should be a safe and convenient way to travel, which means our infrastructure, policy and customer service are all impacted by accessibility. There are a number of different needs among our customers that we try to balance so we have to make sure the solutions we provide are sustainable and won’t hinder other people.

One of our key challenges is finding solutions that strike a balance between the diverse range of needs. We need to be financially responsible to the taxpayer as well, and have to prioritize our initiatives. Other challenges happen with the nature of the region, such as the geography making it difficult to make all bus stops wheelchair accessible.”

Mika says that the greatest strength of the system is that people with disabilities have choice.

“I know I can travel on bus, on SkyTrain, on the water on SeaBus and I will be able to get on there myself and be safe. Also being able to get to the airport without calling a taxi is great!”

I learned a lot travelling through the eyes of someone who faces accessibility challenges in her daily life.

On each part of our transit trip, I thought about space on buses, location of elevators, fare box heights, even something as simple as getting on and off a transit vehicle while others are trying to do the same.

These are things as an able-bodied person, I admit, I sometimes take for granted. Perhaps we all do. But it’s important to see through the eyes of others to really understand the world beyond ourselves.

As for the future, Sarah Chung says as an organization, TransLink is constantly growing and adapting our system to meet the needs of our customers.

“We are always looking at improvements to make the system as inclusive as possible. For example, we have a high percentage of wheelchair accessible bus stops, and have introduced a pilot project to make bus stops more accessible for people who are blind or partially sighted. The pilot includes tactile information panels and tactile walking surfaces to help people identify stop information and locations. As a region, we have recently transitioned to a contactless smart card payment system and are continue to work with partners to develop solutions for customers who have limited or no arm mobility.”

Have a look at some pictures from our day together.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Metrotown loop truss is going up!

As part of the ongoing work at Metrotown Station, construction crews will lift the second half of a massive 120 ton overhead steel structure overnight on September 10 – that’s this Saturday!

To give crews the time and space they need to safely install the loop truss, SkyTrain will not run between Patterson and Royal Oak stations after midnight on Saturday, September 10. Scheduled construction for September 9 has been cancelled.

Frequent shuttle buses will run between Patterson, Metrotown and Royal Oak stations for customers who want to travel to or from Metrotown Station, eastbound beyond Patterson Station, or westbound beyond Royal Oak Station.

Eastbound train service from Royal Oak Station will also be extended to allow connections from the last train and shuttle bus.

Customers should plan for an additional 15 to 20 minutes of travel time while the work is underway. Customers may find it faster to take the Millennium Line from Commercial-Broadway.

The loop truss is the roof of the new west stationhouse. In order to lift the 120 ton structure into place, two cranes will be used – a 250 ton crane and a 500 ton crane – yowza!

The first half of the lift was completed on August 25.

Want the latest on Metrotown Station Upgrades?
Click here or check OnTrack!

Author: Jennifer Morland

The Transit Service Performance Review results are in!

Report cover - graphic

Today, we released the findings of the 2015 Transit System Performance Review (TSPR), a comprehensive review of ridership and service productivity for bus, SeaBus, SkyTrain and West Coast Express.

FYI: This is the first year the review has expanded beyond bus!

The TSPR gives us valuable information on boardings, ridership, transit trends and more. By monitoring services and ridership, we can respond to changing demands with available resources.

“The Transit Service Performance Review demonstrates how we are actively monitoring the transit system across Metro Vancouver to improve our performance. We know where we need to reduce overcrowding, improve travel speed and respond to changing customer demands,” said TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond. “The 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision sets out a blue print to tackle these needs and with sustainable investment, we can take action.” 

Increasing Ridership

We had record ridership across the system in 2015 with 364 million boardings – that’s our highest ever!

Boardings remained high despite decreased per-capita service hours and slower bus speeds.

The annual review shows that ridership across the system continues to grow:

  • Total system-wide boardings increased 2.1 per cent and total bus boardings increased 2.8 per cent, year-over-year. SkyTrain passenger volumes at Canada, Expo and Millennium line stations have also increased by up to 28 per cent.
  • West Coast Express and SeaBus ridership remains steady. In 2015 there were 6.1 million recorded boardings on SeaBus; if it were a bus route, it would rank tenth highest in annual boardings!

Other trends identified during the 2015 Transit Service Performance Review include:

  • Bus boardings in all sub-regions continue to grow or remain stable
  • Some bus routes have consecutive years of growth in boardings, contrary to system-wide trend
  • Almost half of bus revenue hours with chronic overcrowding occur outside weekday peak periods
  • SkyTrain passenger volumes continue to increase
  • Weekend passenger volumes on SkyTrain are similar to weekday volumes outside of peak periods

What happens next?

Knowing how our transit system performs helps to ensure that we are responding to changing customer demand with available resources and lays the foundation for future investment. The data from the TSPR shows us the need for transit investment in our region is high.

Transit ridership across the system continues to grow despite decreased service hours and service speed. The 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision sets out a blue print to tackle these needs and with sustainable investment we can take action. We are currently developing the 10-year Investment Plan which supports the 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision.

Based on the findings from the review, we’ve strategically allocated available resources to improve the experience for our customers:

  • 15,000 revenue service hours were reallocated from bus routes with low demand to routes where customers need them most
  • Service frequencies were increased to reduce overcrowding on a number of routes, including the 49, 100 and C23 in Vancouver; C28 in the Northeast Sector; 335 and 351 in the South of Fraser; and 403 and 410 in Richmond.
  • Improvements were also made to the NightBus network to provide extended service hours and increased frequency.

Did you know?

Thirty per cent of trips on the system involve a multi-modal transfer (almost all are bus to SkyTrain transfers).

SkyTrain ridership at individual stations has grown by up to 28 per cent. The stations where ridership is growing the fastest are Canada Line stations that have experienced significant redevelopment, including:

  • Olympic Village (driven by new, mixed-used development)
  • Templeton (driven by new, McArthur Glen outlet mall)
  • Marine Gateway (driven by new, mixed-use development adjacent to the station)

Want to learn more? You can read the full report here.

Author: Jessica Hewitt

The I Love Transit 2016 issue of the Buzzer is now on the system

buzzer_header_template

I Love Transit is back and so is the annual special print Buzzer edition!Bordered

In this issue you will find the Fall Service Changes – for more detailed  information and up-to-date changes visit translink.ca/servicechanges.

Don’t miss the fantastic colouring contest!

Colour the I Love Transit illustration and you will be entered for a chance to win a Monthly Pass!

We will have two draws; one for children under 15 years old and one for adults.

The next issue of the Buzzer, out on September 22, will be a special one as well as we celebrate 20 years of Poetry in Transit!

Happy reading! Pick it up today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or you can download it here.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Station upgrade news from Joyce–Collingwood

Joyce

Rendering of what the station will look like when the upgrades project is complete

As you may well know, upgrades to Joyce–Collingwood Station are underway!

The upgrades will improve accessibility, capacity, safety and security at the fourth busiest Expo Line Station outside of Downtown Vancouver.

Project benefits

  • New elevator and up and down escalators in the east stationhouse
  • Improved station design with better lighting and visibility
  • Better integration with the community for easier SkyTrain connections

Project update

  • The majority of ground-level demolition work is now complete.
  • Installation of concrete columns and footings to support the new east stationhouse is ongoing.
  • Painting work has begun.

Upcoming work

On July 24, 2016, construction crews are switching out the power source at the station. During this time, several bus stops will be relocated from 5:30 p.m. to end of service to in order to give crews the space they need to work. Signs will be installed at the bus loop to direct customers to their stop. Escalators and elevators will also be out of service during this time.

Below is a summary of what customers can expect at the station over the coming months:

  • The east entrance will remain closed until upgrades are complete in fall 2017, when the project is expected to be complete.
  • Steel and roofing work is expected to begin later this summer.
  • Noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating will continue.

Thank you for your patience as we complete these much-needed upgrades to the Joyce–Collingwood Station and stay tuned for additional updates throughout the project.

Contact Us

Have questions? We’re here to listen!

Customer Information: 604.953.3333
Monday to Friday: 5:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday: 6:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Overnight Station Upgrade Customer Service: 1.866.979.0930
Monday to Friday: 12:30 a.m. to 5:30 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday: 11:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

For more information visit:
translink.ca/joyce

Author: Jennifer Morland

Update to the C9 route this September 5, 2016

The updated C9 route as of September 5, 2016

The updated C9 route as of September 5, 2016

 

New Westminster residents will see a slight change in their C9 community shuttle route starting September 5, 2016.

This shuttle currently runs on a temporary route, which primarily runs along Columbia Street as it travels between Lougheed Station and New Westminster Station. It makes one diversion along Richmond Street, turning into Jamieson Court before returning to Columbia Street.

On September 5th the C9 will turn off of Columbia Street and run along a portion Cumberland and Richmond Street, with stops at Richmond and Cumberland and on Richmond at Miner Street. Service on Jamieson Court will continue.

For a larger view, check the .pdf.

CMBC attends provincially-led earthquake and tsunami response exercise

image1

Jon Arason, Emergency Management & Business Continuity Advisor and Stephen Shimek, Manager, Safety & Emergency Management

Always be prepared. It’s not just the boy scout’s motto!

Being prepared in an event of an emergency is important at home, at work AND on transit.

CMBC recently attended a response preparedness exercise put on by the province as to how this region could handle a larger earthquake and subsequent tsunami and how transit could help.

Living in the Pacific Northwest, we’ve often read that our beautiful province is at risk for a devastating earthquake followed by a tsunami. Given this knowledge, creating a professional disaster-response plan is not only important, but necessary.

Recognized as an organization that consistently ensures the safety and security of its staff and customers, CMBC recently took part in Exercise Coastal Response (June 7-10), the first-ever provincially-led earthquake and tsunami response exercise.

Based on a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami, the event included real-time simulation activities, focusing on what steps the province and its partners would take following such a catastrophic disturbance.

While in attendance at the South West Provincial Regional Emergency Operations Centre on day three of the event, CMBC’s Stephen Shimek (Manager, Safety & Emergency Management) and Jon Arason (Emergency Management & Business Continuity Advisor) shared important information with their colleagues.

“At the start of it,” said Shimek, “they didn’t realize what services we could provide. As we talked through it, they realized how much of an asset we are in any event like this, providing a multitude of different services, including bus shelters and transportation.”20160609_114725resize

“We became one of the partners in the exercise,” said Shimek, “having a critical role as an organization that can provide support during an earthquake event.”
The real value, according to both employees, was sharing essential information. “We needed to give them updated contact info for TransLink and the bus company,” said Arason, “as well as clarify what our role during a disaster would be.”

Not considered first responders, CMBC’s attendees emphasized what the organization is focused on. “We’re more than willing to help as a company,” said Arason, “we have a great track record of doing that, but we need to protect our staff, our riders, and we need to protect our assets.”

During one of the exercises, the organizers declared a provincial state of emergency, allowing them to provide further instructions to their partners, which include CMBC and TransLink. This prompted Arason, who referred to the post-disaster reality of fuel shortage and being short-staffed, to advise the province that the organization would need to manage itself first. “Once we know (we’re) safe, we’ll be rendering whatever assistance we can.”

Preparing for their own similar-type exercise this fall, Shimek and Arason agree there was an important takeaway from Exercise Coastal Response. “It reinforce(d) the fact that in order for us to support the city and the Lower Mainland, we have to be prepared ourselves, making sure that our own EOC (Emergency Operations Centre) is up and running and functional.”

Author: Kim Van Haren

The June 2016 issue of the Buzzer is now on the system

Much of this issue is dedicated to summer service changes. Print Buzzer front

Which means more service for popular summer destination routes! Woot!

Also in this issue, we invite you to attend Pattullo Bridge Replacement consultation events in person and online.

There is a reminder to take the Fare Review Survey before June 30 as well as a call out for YOU to become part of the team as a bus operator!

Of course, we still have our favourites – Contest Corner, Back Issues and Coming Events.

Happy reading! Pick it up today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or you can download it here.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Late night SkyTrain single tracking resumes June 12

Vehicle-on-track

Single tracking will run from June 12 into fall 2016

Beginning June 12 and continuing into the fall, SkyTrain will single track at several stations, primarily during late night hours, due to maintenance work and system upgrades.

Riders should plan on up to 20 minutes of extra travel time during these single tracking events.

Need a refresher as to what single tracking is and why its needed?

I’ve got your back!

Single tracking is when we run trains in both directions over a single piece of track. It’s like taking a two-lane road down to one lane and having a signal or flag, person regulating traffic in the remaining lane so it only flows in one direction at a time. – Ian Fisher, BCRTC

In fact, many railways operate this way where they do not have two tracks to use.

We use single tracking to give crews time to perform necessary work on one track while we keep the other track open for service.

Single tracking – stations and dates:

  • Metrotown and Patterson stations (June 12-16, 24-25): Allow 10-20 minutes, Millennium Line operates VCC-Clark – Columbia only
  • Columbia and Scott Road stations (June 21-23, 26-28): Allow 5-10 minutes
  • Columbia and New Westminster stations (June 29-30, July 3-7): Allow 5-10 minutes

Work has been scheduled to avoid large events, such as concerts, sporting events and community celebrations.

You can learn lots more about single tracking from our interview with BCRTC last fall.

Thank you for your patience while we perform upgrades and important maintenance work to the system.

For information on the service impacts visit translink.ca,
check our Transit Alerts, follow TransLink on Twitter
or call Transit Information and Customer Feedback at 604-953-3333.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Join us for TransLink’s AGM on June 23, 2016

AGM-Facebook-FINAL-V2

Each year, TransLink holds our Annual General Meeting (AGM).

The AGM is where TransLink and its operating companies review highlights of the past year in transit from financial to operational milestones, our latest Annual Report and a whole lot more.

We also open the floor to questions from riders and community members just like you!

Our June Open Board Meeting will follow the AGM after a brief break.

Details:

June 23, 2016
Annual General Meeting
9:00 – 9:45 a.m.
Open Board Meeting 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
TransLink Head Office
400-287 Nelson’s Court, New Westminster

 Unable to attend? Not to worry!
Both events will be filmed and available on translink.ca.

**UPDATE**

TransLink 2015 Annual General Meeting

You can also review our AGM videos for the past give years here.

Author: Adrienne Coling

It’s time to talk about transit fares

Regular blog readers have been asking about this for years and we’re super excited to announce we’re looking at our transit fares again!

Over the years, the transit system in Metro Vancouver has grown into a diverse and expansive network that now provides nearly one million rides every day. But since 1984, one thing hasn’t changed much.

With the rollout of Compass, we now have new tools to create a fare system that provides a better customer experience.

What do you like about the current fare system? What would you change? As part of the first of four phases in the TransLink Transit Fare review, we want to hear what’s important to you.

As you know, our current fare system is made up of six core components that determine how much you pay to use transit in Metro Vancouver.

  • Distance travelled
  • Transit service
  • Time of travel
  • Fare product
  • Customer group
  • Journey time

In the Fare Review, everything is on table — don’t take anything for granted and get ready to share your opinions.

Take the survey between May 24 and June 30, 2016 at translink.ca/farereview and have your say on how to improve the transit fare system.

History of Fare Systems

As noted in our 125 Years of Transit series, Vancouver’s first public transit vehicle was an electric streetcar that rolled down Main Street for the first time in 1890. Soon, it was transporting Vancouver’s early residents and visitors along nine kilometres of track throughout the city. A few months later, an expansion line was opened to New Westminster.

From its earliest days, public transit in Metro Vancouver has focused on crossing municipal boundaries to connect the region. After nearly 100 years of experimenting with zones and boundaries, in 1984 a three-zone fare structure similar to the one we have today was created. From one flat fare for all trips to over 100 fares to choose from, our transit system has tried it all.

1958: 100 Fare options

1958: An 11- zone system is introduced with 100 different fare options based on where your trip starts and ends

1958: An 11- zone system is introduced with 100 different fare options based on where your trip starts and ends

Read more »