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Translink Buzzer Blog

Category: The Facts Matter

The Facts Matter: How TransLink contributes to the North Shore, the Northeast Sector and more!

TransLink invests in your community

TransLink invests in your community

Here’s another post for the The Facts Matter!

This post showcases a few regional projects, where in addition to transit, TransLink has contributed to infrastructure, cycling and roads.

This week is the North Shore, the Northeast Sector, Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows.

Take a look at just some of the investments from 2012-2015 in these areas.

North Shore

  • Improving bike route on St. Andrews Ave (Esplanade to 23 St.) – $13,000
  • Traffic signal improvements (Mount Seymour Pkwy. at Broadview Dr.) – $75,000
  • Improvements to the Spirit Trail (Marine Dr./Orchill Rd. to Gleneagles Elementary) – $125,000

Northeast Sector, Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows

  • Building a multi-use pathway on 128 Ave. (210 St. to Laity St. and 216 St. to 222 St.)– $1,282,560
  • Intersection improvements (Shaughnessy St. and Fraser Ave.) – $50,000
  • Seismic upgrades to the Moody St. Overpass – $332,640

Each municipality has their own fact sheet and you can see what’s been done in, and being planned for, your community’s future.

Head to The Facts Matter page to find out more ways TransLink has has contributed to transit, roads and cycling.

You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.

Author: Laura Tennant

The Facts Matter: How TransLink contributes to the Region

TransLink invests in YOUR community

TransLink contributes across the region

I’m back with another post for The Facts Matter!

I’m going to continue to highlight some of the areas and projects in the region where TransLink has contributed to roads, cycling and, of course, transit.

This week is Delta and Richmond.

Take a look at just some of the investments from 2012-2015 in these areas.

Richmond

  • Road widening on Westminster Hwy (Nelson Rd. to McMillan Way) -$1,234,250
  • Installing traffic detection systems at six Steveston Hwy. intersections – $111,000
  • Bike route improvements along Ash St.  (Granville Ave. to Williams Rd.) – $133,500

Delta

  • Building a bike lane and improving street lights on Ladner Trunk Rd. (64 St. to 72 St.) – $88,000
  • Intersection improvements at River Rd. and Huston Rd. – $557,000
  • Road widening of Ladner Trunk Rd. (Hwy. 17 to 64 St.) – $424,500

Each municipality has their own fact sheet and you can see what’s been done in, and being planned for, your community’s future.

Head to The Facts Matter page to find out more ways TransLink has has contributed to transit, roads and cycling.

You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.

Author: Adrienne Coling

The Facts Matter: Transit, Roads and Cycling in your Community

TransLink invests in YOUR community

TransLink contributions across the region

$145 million dollars. That is a big number and can be a tad difficult to interpret. So, let’s break it down a bit further.

Last week we looked at contributions TransLink has made in Burnaby and New Westminster since 2012. This week, Surrey and Langley are up!

Here are just a few of the projects and investments in these areas:

Langley

  • Fraser Hwy. road widening (228 St. to 23500 block) – $ 2,716,000
  • New bike lanes on 48 Ave. (20400 block to 210 St.) – $209,000
  • Introduction of new 96 B-Line service linking Guildford and Newton via Surrey Central Station

Surrey

  • Widening 16th Ave. (crossing over Hwy 99) and building bike lanes in both directions – $ 4,655,895
  • First phase of the Surrey Lake Greenway (140th St. to Coopershawk Crt.) -$185,700
  • Introduced new express service (555 Port Mann Express) across the Port Mann Bridge linking Carvolth Exchange, Fraser Heights/Guildford and Braid SkyTrain Station.

Each municipality has their own fact sheet and you can see what’s been done in, and being planned for, your community’s future.

Head to The Facts Matter page to find out more ways TransLink has has contributed to transit, roads and cycling.

You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.

Author: Adrienne Coling

The Facts Matter: Investments in your community

TransLink invests in YOUR community

TransLink invests in YOUR community

TransLink invests in your community. Just like the title says!

Since 2012, TransLink has invested $145 million in transit, road and cycling improvements in every community across the region.

TransLink commits funding to municipalities to operate, maintain and rehabilitate the 2,300 km of the Major Road Network (MRN).hpr_muni_investments

The funds go toward necessary work, including street cleaning and snow removal, maintaining streetlights, traffic signals and signs, patching potholes and pavement rehabilitation.

Each municipality receives an amount that corresponds to the amount of MRN roads in its area.

TransLink also has a cost sharing program to contribute up to 50% of eligible capital costs to upgrade roads on the MRN and bicycle infrastructure in the Metro Vancouver region.

Head to The Facts Matter page to find out more ways TransLink has has invested in your community.

You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.

Author: Adrienne Coling

The Facts Matter: TransLink’s checklist

The Facts Matter report card

TransLink saved $240 million since 2012

How exactly has TransLink cut costs, eliminated waste and saved money?

Well, take a look at our checklist!

Here are a few examples:

1.   Saved $19 million through bus scheduling and labour efficiencies.
2.   Received more than $2 million in rebates from WorkSafeBC for employee safety practices.
3.   Achieved more than $25 million in transportation infrastructure improvements at no cost to taxpayers.

And that is just the tip of the iceberg!

Overall, since 2012, TransLink has saved an incredible $240 million.Facts matter 240

Want to know the best part? It was all done without cutting service.

Head to The Facts Matter page to find out more ways TransLink has saved money.

You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.

 

Author: Adrienne Coling

The Facts Matter: How TransLink spends each dollar

The breakdown of how TransLink spent each dollar in 2013.

The breakdown of how TransLink spent each dollar in 2013.

Just how does TransLink spend each dollar? Well, here’s a handy graphic that answers that question.

As you can see, these 2013 numbers show that the majority of the money is spent on delivering transit and keeping the system in good repair (transit/cycling infrastructure and capital repayment = 89¢). The remainder is spent on making sure people, goods and services can move smoothly on the Major Road Network and the five bridges TransLink is responsible for (roads and bridges = 3¢) as well as making sure the transit system is safe (transit police = 3¢). What’s left goes to administration and preparing for the future (administration and planning = 5¢).

Want to know more about how TransLink invests in transportation and where and how the money is used? You’ll want to check out The Facts Matter page. You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.

The Facts Matter: A new series about TransLink and its operating companies

facts_matter_buzzer_header

TransLink's main areas of responsibility

TransLink’s main areas of responsibility

We have a new section on our website we’re excited to share: The Facts Matter.

Unlike most transit authorities in North America, TransLink’s mandate is more than just public transit. Besides the conventional buses, HandyDART, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express fleets, we’re also responsible for the Major Roads Network, five bridges, cycling infrastructure and transit police.

Of course, readers of this blog know all this. But not everyone is as informed as Buzzer readers ;) .

What many aren’t familiar with are the details about how our public funds are spent in order to fulfill our mandate. That’s why we’ve added these facts to our website and are sharing them on social media and the transit system.

 The Facts Matter page on the TransLink website is a great resource for many of the questions our riders ask us on a regular bases. The facts on this page include:

  • How TransLink spends taxpayers’ money
  • How TransLink compares to other transit authorities
  • How others, including our customers, describe TransLink’s performance
  • How TransLink keeps costs down
  • CEO compensation
  • A breakdown of TransLink road and cycling investments by each geographical region in Metro Vancouver

As a public institution, it’s important to us that the public is informed about what TransLink does with public funds. Below is a breakdown of the how we spent your money in 2014.

TransLink's investments in transportation in 2014

TransLink’s investments in transportation in 2014

Our 2014 total fleet number
So how do our 2014 investment numbers translate into the our vehicle fleet numbers?

Currently we have more than 2,100 vehicles in our different fleets. Follow this link to find the specific numbers of each vehicle fleet as of 2013. Our fleets fluctuate in size throughout the year and we audit the fleet numbers every two years. So we won’t have 2014 numbers until 2016.

Over the next few months, we’ll be posting and delving into the different facts in this series.

As always, we encourage your questions and will try our best to find answers for you.

Do you know someone who has questions about TransLink and how we invest in the transportation needs of Metro Vancouver? Please share these facts with them and encourage them to post a comment!