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It’s going to be a ‘green’ Christmas on the Millennium Line!


This is the first test train on the Evergreen Line alignment in Port Moody. The train is travelling from Inlet Centre Station to Moody Centre Station. Courtesy of B.C. Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure

BIG NEWS from the province today! I’ll give you two hints just in case the title didn’t resonate.

  1. Ever.
  2. Green.

So, not only is the Evergreen Extension to the Millennium Line going to be open before Christmas, but stations will also be provided with parking for commuters.

This includes 150 new spaces available for transit users at the Lafarge Lake-Douglas Station that are fully funded within the project’s $1.43 billion budget and are on top of the 500 parking spaces outlined in the project’s scope!

What is TransLink doing now?

We here at TransLink are so thrilled with today’s announcement!

We continue to get ready behind the scenes to ensure that customers will have an easy transition right out of the gates.

There’s a lot to do and want to get it right before the extension officially opens.

What about the Mark IIIs?

A few Mark III trains have been on the system since August 18 and will continue to roll out and used where customers need them most.

Read the province’s entire press release here.

Want the latest on Evergreen?
The Evergreen Line Project:
Information in other languages is available at:
Twitter: @TranBC #EvergreenlineBC

Author: Adrienne Coling

The Transit Service Performance Review results are in!

Report cover - graphic

Today, we released the findings of the 2015 Transit System Performance Review (TSPR), a comprehensive review of ridership and service productivity for bus, SeaBus, SkyTrain and West Coast Express.

FYI: This is the first year the review has expanded beyond bus!

The TSPR gives us valuable information on boardings, ridership, transit trends and more. By monitoring services and ridership, we can respond to changing demands with available resources.

“The Transit Service Performance Review demonstrates how we are actively monitoring the transit system across Metro Vancouver to improve our performance. We know where we need to reduce overcrowding, improve travel speed and respond to changing customer demands,” said TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond. “The 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision sets out a blue print to tackle these needs and with sustainable investment, we can take action.” 

Increasing Ridership

We had record ridership across the system in 2015 with 364 million boardings – that’s our highest ever!

Boardings remained high despite decreased per-capita service hours and slower bus speeds.

The annual review shows that ridership across the system continues to grow:

  • Total system-wide boardings increased 2.1 per cent and total bus boardings increased 2.8 per cent, year-over-year. SkyTrain passenger volumes at Canada, Expo and Millennium line stations have also increased by up to 28 per cent.
  • West Coast Express and SeaBus ridership remains steady. In 2015 there were 6.1 million recorded boardings on SeaBus; if it were a bus route, it would rank tenth highest in annual boardings!

Other trends identified during the 2015 Transit Service Performance Review include:

  • Bus boardings in all sub-regions continue to grow or remain stable
  • Some bus routes have consecutive years of growth in boardings, contrary to system-wide trend
  • Almost half of bus revenue hours with chronic overcrowding occur outside weekday peak periods
  • SkyTrain passenger volumes continue to increase
  • Weekend passenger volumes on SkyTrain are similar to weekday volumes outside of peak periods

What happens next?

Knowing how our transit system performs helps to ensure that we are responding to changing customer demand with available resources and lays the foundation for future investment. The data from the TSPR shows us the need for transit investment in our region is high.

Transit ridership across the system continues to grow despite decreased service hours and service speed. The 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision sets out a blue print to tackle these needs and with sustainable investment we can take action. We are currently developing the 10-year Investment Plan which supports the 2014 Mayors’ Council Vision.

Based on the findings from the review, we’ve strategically allocated available resources to improve the experience for our customers:

  • 15,000 revenue service hours were reallocated from bus routes with low demand to routes where customers need them most
  • Service frequencies were increased to reduce overcrowding on a number of routes, including the 49, 100 and C23 in Vancouver; C28 in the Northeast Sector; 335 and 351 in the South of Fraser; and 403 and 410 in Richmond.
  • Improvements were also made to the NightBus network to provide extended service hours and increased frequency.

Did you know?

Thirty per cent of trips on the system involve a multi-modal transfer (almost all are bus to SkyTrain transfers).

SkyTrain ridership at individual stations has grown by up to 28 per cent. The stations where ridership is growing the fastest are Canada Line stations that have experienced significant redevelopment, including:

  • Olympic Village (driven by new, mixed-used development)
  • Templeton (driven by new, McArthur Glen outlet mall)
  • Marine Gateway (driven by new, mixed-use development adjacent to the station)

Want to learn more? You can read the full report here.

Author: Jessica Hewitt

Vivienne King – BCRTC President & CEO wants to answer your SkyTrain questions online and in person (Sept 7 & 8)!

Vivienne King, President & General Manager of BCRTC will be taking your questions about SkyTrain at noon on September 7, 2016!

Vivienne King, President & General Manager of BCRTC, will be taking your questions about SkyTrain at noon on September 7, 2016 and in person on September 8!

Have you ever had burning questions about Metro Vancouver’s SkyTrain? How safe are SkyTrains? What exactly do SkyTrain attendants do? Why are different SkyTrains painted different colours?

Well, on Wednesday September 7th, from 12pm – 1pm, we’ll have Vivienne King, President and CEO of BCRTC, live on Reddit for an AMA! (Ask Me Anything).

Busy for lunch tomorrow? Well, maybe you wanna ask Vivienne your question in person. Vivienne will take your questions in person on Thursday September 8th, from approximately 7:30-9a.m. at Waterfront station at the entrance of SeaBus/West Coast Express and SkyTrain (just inside the fare paid zone and not far from Starbucks).

So, mark your calendars transit fans! Here is the link that will be live at noon.

Can’t make either one, but still have a question to ask? Just post your question in the comments section or on Twitter or Facebook and we’ll do our best to ask Vivienne for you! See you soon!

Author: Sarah Kertcher

I Love Transit: LEGO my SkyTrain!

For 80’s kids (and decades either side), LEGO was a way of life.

You’ll remember building the next Empire State Building, CN tower or the complete Star Trek Enterprise and, of course, the sound your parents made as they stepped on the extraordinarily painful blocks!

William Fong was a childhood fan as well but didn’t actually buy LEGO until he decided to make a SkyTrain!

We got a chance to ask Will some questions about this intensely detailed project.

Take a look!

What made you want to make a SkyTrain?

As someone who is a daily user of the transit system, and as someone who has a minor interest in design in general, I found that the 2009 Skytrain stock extremely intriguing. It’s the most modern and well designed piece of equipment in the fleet (although Xcelsiors are pretty excellent buses and the new Bombardier 300’s probably trump that claim, too).

The colour scheme of the exterior and interior, streamlined shape as well as adding user friendliness, like destination boards, updated system maps, better seat layout and air conditioning. Everything was done right on the 2009 trains!

I think the main reason I wanted to recreate some of the great design features in LEGO was because I had the passing realization that there were some new LEGO pieces that had striking resemblance to the angles on the trains. I designed the LEGO train mostly around the windscreen due to its identical curved shape to the real life train. I didn’t start building it until I was satisfied with the accuracy of the curvature of the roof as well as finding a way to have doors that could slide open. I also chose this specific train because of the number of seats. Three seats and an aisle is about as wide as you can make a train in LEGO before it starts looking too wide.

The details are so perfect, how did you get the stickers and other minature details of the actual train ON the LEGO model?

I made the stickers in Photoshop. Interior graphics like the system map and the safety and security sign were entirely drawn from scratch using photos as a reference. I didn’t want to print photos as stickers because they didn’t scale to the LEGO very well.

The exterior livery was based off of and extremely altered from the information sheet that was shown alongside the 2009 presentation of the new Mark II stock, which I found online. The corporate and government logos as well as official fonts were found on the internet. I then sent the artwork off to a printing company named Model Decal Depot at Adlion Printing to have the graphics put onto vinyl stickers. The stickers are especially important because they complete the train more than people may realize, mostly because the doors are stickers that have been applied onto LEGO window panes.

What are some of the cool features of your model?

The model is as accurate to real life as I could build it. It has an identical seat count to its real life counterpart. Curved handrails, which may not seem remarkable, but when building out of lego, it is! It has an articulated corridor joining the two cars. It has the same number of ceiling lights as in real life. Orange “Door open” lights in the door jambs that can be toggled on the left or right doors. The doors can also be slid open and are not just decorative placeholders. Directional lights, so that when the headlights are on at one end of the train, the taillights are on at the opposite end. The advertising boards are illuminated using something called electro-luminescent tape (a strip of copper that is coated with phosphorus and glows when an alternating current is applied to it).

It’s also not just a stationary model. Each train is also powered by two 9V DC motors, so it can move along track. Hopefully by next BrickCan, I’ll have built enough elevated guideway for it to run a decent length.

How long did it take you to create?

I think I finished the digital model in 2011. I wasn’t satisfied with the accuracy until late 2013 and held off building it until early 2014.

The digital model continued to go through several revisions which slowed me down, but it was mostly the cost of the model that made me build it on and off for a while. Building one car was costly enough, but when I found out that there was going to be a LEGO convention in Vancouver, I decided to spend the extra money and twin the first car and build some overhead guideway for it to sit on. It wasn’t right up until April 2016 during BrickCan that I completed both cars and the two sections of track.

Technically, I’m still not done yet. I just finished gutting and reinstalling all of the electronics this month. I want to reprint the stickers to more closely match some colours in the livery as well as correct some inaccuracies. I’m also going to install digital destination boards, although I’m running into technical issues with the hardware for that right now. Maybe later on, I’ll also install speakers inside the train, too.

How many pieces are involved?

Each train car has approximately 1900 lego pieces and 60 LEDs. 2000 pieces for the track and supports.

Have you done any other notable Metro Vancouver model recreations?

This is my first ever model, but I am planning to build others in the future. Next one might be a trolley bus from Vancouver’s not-too-distant past. I’m also trying to figure out how to recreate the new Innovia 300, but it’s been tough to get started because the angles are so different.

What is the most complicated project you’ve made out of LEGO?

This train. From trouble shooting how to cram in all the wires to trying to find workarounds for discontinued and extremely expensive pieces, it was a headache. Not to say that I won’t build something again. Maybe just something cheaper that is less technical. At least I semi-know what I’m doing now. Prior to this, I hadn’t picked up a soldering pen since grade 8.

Thank you to Will for letting us share his fantastic (and extremely detailed!) SkyTrain model! We can’t wait to see what he blocks up next.

Author: Adrienne Coling

I Love Transit: Redhead Mare guest post – Vancouver Travel Tip

I Love Transit 2016

I love transit week is coming to a close, and I kind of feel like this has been the best week ever! Today, our guest poster vlogger Redhead Mare shares with us how her family uses and loves transit!

Thanks for sharing the love and transit tips! Check out Mare and her other adventures over on her blog!

What are your SkyTrain tips when travelling with kids?

Driving the conversation on automated vehicles

Courtesy of General Motors

Courtesy of General Motors

Vehicle automation is developing at a rapid pace. As a transportation authority, TransLink wants to be ready for new technologies hitting the region’s roadways and to position Metro Vancouver to harness the potential benefits.

To that end, TransLink kicked off the Future of Driving Project in September 2015, hosting a series of discussions with local government staff on how we should leverage automated vehicles and new mobility services in a way that best supports the region’s goals of a healthy economy, people, and environment through compact urban growth and more sustainable transportation choices.

New technologies can be rolled out, used, combined and adopted by the public in countless different ways that are impossible to predict. As a way to handle this uncertainty, the group developed four possible scenarios: Status Quo, Motor City, Uncoordinated Mobility, and Coordinated Mobility.

Our discussions considered how we should begin to plan for the advent of automated vehicles under each of these possible scenarios, including:

  • how we forecast travel demand and infrastructure needs,
  • how we manage and price parking and road usage,
  • how we integrate new mobility services into the current transportation system, and
  • how we design our streets and public spaces.

The result of these discussions is Future of Driving, a report that maps out a path forward for the region. Recommendations include:

  1. Updating transportation policies and regulations to promote shared automated vehicles in support of regional objectives to reduce driving and increase walking, cycling and transit use.
  2. Proactively position TransLink to navigate rapid change while maintaining the resiliency of transportation operations and improving the customer experience; and
  3. Collaborating with partners in government, academia and industry to create a social innovation lab that will test innovative ideas to harness the positive benefits from new vehicle technologies and new mobility services.

Author: Megan Johnston

Hamilton Transit Centre opens in Richmond!

I Love Transit 2016

Today is an exciting day for TransLink, Coast Mountain Bus Company and transit users across the region!

The brand new Hamilton Transit Centre (HTC) is open and will start operations on September 5, 2016.

Transit centres are the hubs of transit systems. They keep buses on the roads to get passengers where they need to go.

Hamilton Transit Centre has capacity for 300 forty-foot buses, including up to 80 community shuttle buses and 150 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fuelled buses.

HTC will perform three functions: dispatch, fuel and wash service as well as maintenance for buses servicing the Richmond, New Westminster, Burnaby and Vancouver areas.

Watch the video above where Joe Peschisolido, Member of Parliament for StevestonRichmond East, the Hon. Peter Fassbender, Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development and Minister Responsible for TransLink, Al Richmond, UBCM president, TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond, and Councillor Harold Steves, Acting Mayor of Richmond celebrated the opening in Richmond today.

Author: Adrienne Coling

I Love Transit: Spokesmama Guest Post – Camping via Transit

I Love Transit 2016

On the bus in Nanaimo

To help celebrate I love transit week, Lisa – also known as Spokesmama, is guest posting and sharing with us how her and her family use transit on their weekend adventures!

This summer we tried something new to us: camping by transit. We don’t own a car, so we generally rent or use Modo car co-op vehicles, or bike to camp. We heard that Newcastle Island was a great destination, and quickly realized that transit was the best way for us to get there. Taking the bus meant carrying nearly everything on our backs except for a small cart that held our cooler and some of the heavier items; planning what we’d bring was a fun challenge.

If you haven’t heard of it before, Newcastle Island sits in the waters a stone’s throw from Nanaimo—almost literally. The entire island is a provincial park, about the size of Stanley Park, with campsites at the south end near the small private ferry that runs from downtown Nanaimo.

Our journey started off with a 15-minute bus ride on the #19 to downtown Vancouver at 9am. We then walked a couple of blocks to the #257 Horseshoe Bay Express. We could have ridden the #19 bus all the way to Stanley Park and transferred at the same stop on Georgia near Denman, but here’s a pro tip for you: on long weekends the #257 bus gets quite full, so if you have luggage and/or children, it’s much better to get on at the very first stop on Dunsmuir at Hamilton.

We arrived in Horseshoe Bay with plenty of time to catch the 10:40am ferry to Nanaimo. Our children spent some time in the Kids Zone, on the tiny play structures in it and watching some TV. Once we’d caffeinated a little, we headed outside for the best part of ferry travel: walking around on the outside decks. The kids loved leaning into the wind and looking for sea animals. We also came across a Bluegrass quartet playing on the solarium on the top deck.

Once the ferry arrived in Departure Bay around 12:30pm, we caught the bus to Maffeo Sutton Park; a ten minute ride. The kids had a play break while one parent headed a few blocks away for the last few items of food and drink that we wanted for our trip, including a few bottles from the newish craft brewery just a block from the park, called White Sails.

After purchasing the last of our supplies, we packed up all our stuff and boarded the ferry to the island. The boat is a stout little craft, holding about 20-30 people, luggage and the occasional bicycle. The crossing is only a few minutes. We stopped on Protection Island first, (where there’s another pub, by the way).

The walk from the dock to the Newcastle Island camp site is only a few hundred metres. All 18 camp sites are reservable online, however, unlike many BC provincial campgrounds, Newcastle was not booked up months in advance. We reserved our site about two weeks before our trip and noticed a spot or two still available a week before.

Newcastle Island is really lovely to camp on—but unlike most provincial parks, you can’t drive there—it’s water access only—so you really feel like you’ve gotten away from the city. The island is very family friendly with lots to do. We explored three beaches, which was only a few of them. There are a number of wide, well-maintained trails looping through and around the island. There are way finding maps at each trail junction, but note that they don’t include a few recent trail closures. There are also a few interesting ruins of former canneries, salteries, and quarries to poke around, most of which include signage with historical information.

From leaving our house in the morning to arriving at the camp site took under five hours, not including the shopping/park play time in Nanaimo. It’s a very affordable way to travel–$130 for a family of four to take six buses, two ferries, and two boat rides. We really enjoyed our trip and I highly recommend taking transit to camp on Newcastle Island.

If you’d like to read more tips for car free camping, please visit Spokesmama.

I Love Transit: The journey from bus fan to transit operator


Chris and his trusty steed, a 2008 Orion V Suburban

Chris and his trusty steed, a 2008 Orion V Suburban

The words “I love transit” mean a lot to Chris Cassidy.

His foray into the transit world was years ago. His grandfather drove a bus for BC Hydro back in the day and as he grew up, Chris became fascinated with buses and bus routes.

Chris’ passion for transit soon brought him two great friends with similar interests who decided to take and collect thousands of amazing photographs of buses!

That was then when he was a teenage transit fan and this is now. Now, Chris is a bus operator!

Read on about his journey from enthusiast to operator!


My name is Chris Cassidy and I’m a transit operator with Coast Mountain Bus Company. Some of you may know me from and a I’m a huge transit enthusiast!

The interest with transit started when I was quite young. My grandfather used to be an operator, hired back in the BC Hydro days and retired a few years ago with CMBC.

I remember riding around on my grandfathers bus going through White Rock in the early 2000’s. He always got one of the brand new, New Flyer low floors. I liked keeping track of all the different runs we’d do, and watching the world pass by us from the big windows.

Cherry blossoms? Check. Big yellow bus? Check.

Cherry blossoms? Check. Big yellow bus? Check.

A few years after my grandfather retired I came across a local message board, the primary topic? Vancouver transit. At first I thought it was a bit strange, but I joined anyways to see what it was about. Not long after that, I picked up a camera and started making my own little trips around the system.

Through these little adventures I’d end up meeting two of my best friends and fellow bus nerds, David Lam and George Prior. Over the following years I tracked down, rode and documented hundreds of buses across Vancouver. Riding all the new routes, riding routes being replaced (like the 98 B-Line) and exploring this city.

The beautiful farm fields of Delta. Taken while I was heading back to the depot after a PM trip through Tsawwassen

The beautiful farm fields of Delta. Taken while I was heading back to the depot after a PM trip through Tsawwassen

During these travels I became close friends with a few operators. I was a young teen, trying to figure out what I wanted to do with my life and doing ride-alongs with the operators was a good time filler. A routine was developed with one operator who turned out to be my neighbour.

After class was dismissed, I’d run home, drop off my bag, grab my camera and run over to his house. From there we’d drive to the depot, take a bus out for the afternoon rush and complete a few trips. Once we did our trips, we’d take the bus back to the depot and I’d get a ride home. It was my daily routine and really pushed me into the seat. After a few months of this routine it finally dawned on me, I HAD to get behind the wheel!

After high school I worked a few customer service jobs, got my full class 5 license and kept myself out of trouble. To be honest, the thought of driving a full sized 40′ bus through downtown seemed a bit overwhelming and I planned to apply for community shuttle first. But, all those operators that I knew, told me to go big and apply for conventional. So, I did… and I got called in for the video test on a crisp November day.


Posing the bus at the perfect angle for photos before leaving the depot, a daily routine for me.

It’s been just over a year since I finished training and I’ve enjoyed everyday as much as I can. Some expected my passion for transit to diminish but, if anything, it’s only grown! Driving has opened up a whole new technical side to things that I haven’t experienced before. You learn all the neat quirks of each bus, how some have a certain shake at a certain speed, or how some have faster lifts. It can get quite geeky when you get down to the minor details, like horns, but I love it.

I drove in Vancouver for 7 months before I was transferred out to Richmond, a mecca for bus nerds. There are the old low floors, the Orion highway coaches and, of course, the big diesel articulated buses. It was love at first sight with me and the Orion highway buses so, I’ve tried to drive them as much as possible. There’s nothing quite like an early evening cruise down highway 99, watching the sun set over the fields in Delta, while behind the wheel of an Orion V. Just the thought of it makes me smile.

Starting Labour Day, I’m off on another new adventure. I’ll be transferring out of Richmond, and into the Burnaby depot. This gives me a chance to drive the famous 99 B-Line, the ever popular runs to SFU and everything on the North Shore. I’ll miss Richmond quite a bit, but a new challenge is good. Plus, I’ll get to knock off some routes that I’ve never driven before, or ever rode for that matter!


Overall, I’m a transportation geek. So, when I had a chance to get a photo of my coach for the day with a train in the background, I had to use it!

While I’m still quite young and I’m not sure if I’ll keep driving for the rest of my career, I know I’ll never leave transit. What started as a silly hobby, turned into dozens of lifelong friendships and a career I truly love.

My name is Chris Cassidy, I’m a transit operator with Coast Mountain Bus Company and I Love Transit.

Transit enthusiasts take note because this could be you! Thanks to Chris for sharing his awesome experiences and inspiring the next generation of transit fans.

Author: Adrienne Coling

I Love Transit: Don’t forget to share your transit love and keep tapping your Compass Card!

I Love Transit 2016

It’s mid-I Love Transit Week and we’re loving all the things you’re sharing with us! Don’t forget to share the #ILoveTransit love online and in print.

Yesterday we did a Facebook Live about I Love Transit as well as the data we collect with Compass. I had the please of being joined by one of our senior planners to tells us all about the data we collect and why it’s important to always tap your Compass Card.

Spoiler alert – we need the data you provide by tapping your Compass Card to make sure we’re providing the right amount of service to get you where you’re going!

Have a watch and ask us any data or I Love Transit questions you have. We’re standing by!

Author: Robert Willis

C9 Community Shuttle takes a temporary detour

Community Shuttle
Attention all C9 riders!

To accommodate City of New Westminster construction of a bus-only turn signal, the C9 will be temporarily detoured starting in September.

Click the map below to see a larger version of the detour.

C9 detour
Taking the C9? Make your way to any of the following stops:

  • 58742 – NB Richmond @ Miner
  • 52328 – SB Richmond @ Miner
  • 52327 – SB Richmond @ Seymour Ct

From New Westminster Station (Bay 5): via McNeely St, Carnarvon St, 8 St, Columbia St, Richmond St, Jamieson Ct, turn-around, Jamieson Ct, Richmond St, Miner St, Cumberland St, Richmond St, E Columbia St, North Rd Gatineau Pl to Lougheed Station.

From Lougheed Station (Bay 10): via Gatineau Pl, North Rd, E Columbia St, Richmond St, Miner St, Cumberland St, Richmond St, Jamieson Ct, turn-around, Jamieson Ct, Richmond St, Columbia St to New Westminster Station.

Once construction is complete, these stops will remain in service, with a new stop added to the corner of Cumberland St and Richmond St.

Did you know?

Permanent route changes to the C9 are being implemented as a result of the 2015 Transit Network Review (TNR).

Last October and November, TransLink consulted the public and as a result, we received more than 12,000 completed surveys and hundreds of emails, letters and phone calls.

To-date, 14 of the 26 approved packages consulted on have now been implemented. Some route changes, like the C9 have been phased in.

For more information on the Transit Network Review, visit

Author: Jessica Hewitt

I Love Transit: We found love in a Transit place

I Love Transit 2016

Steven and Meghan

We love transit, and we love that YOU love transit, but what we really love, is hearing about you finding love on transit! And believe us, a lot of love is found on transit!

Over 10 years ago Meghan and Steve found love in the most unexpected of places.

It was the last day of school back in 2004, exhausted Meghan decided to call it a night early and she hopped on the 004 Powell Bus at UBC Loop bound for what she expected to be an uneventful trip to North Vancouver. Little did she know, the universe had other plans for her that night!

Steve and I met on Thursday, April 8, 2004 on the #004 Powell Bus at UBC Loop. It was the last day of school and Arts County Fair 2013 was still going strong. I had had my biscuit by 7pm or so after a day of class and partying, so I decided to head home to North Vancouver.

I found a single seat on the bus and as the bus filled up, I noticed the guy standing next to me had his arm in a cast and was being jostled by a group of drunk engineers in their red jackets. I offered him my seat. He refused three times, but I insisted and we got to talking.

He told me he had broken his wrist mountain-biking and had come out to Arts County Fair, but gotten separated from his friends. I can’t remember everything we chatted about during the bus trek downtown, but he made a snap decision to ditch meeting up with his friends on fourth street for dinner.

Steve said he lived in North Vancouver too, but didn’t take transit very often, so we trekked to the SeaBus Station together. As chance would have it, we missed the SeaBus departure by two minutes so we had 28 minutes to spare. I refused his offer to buy me a Starbucks coffee (too much like a date!). We spent the next 28 minute wait and 12 minute SeaBus crossing talking non-stop. Twelve years later, and we still have so much to say to one another!

Steve and Meghan

Congratulations on 12 years of love and your upcoming nuptials Meghan and Steve. Here’s to many more SeaBus crossings, and years of love to come!

Author: Sarah Kertcher

I Love Transit: “My Best Passenger”


It’s here, it’s here! I Love Transit 2016 is here!

Some of the best stories of transit love come to us from our front line staff like our bus operators.

Vickie Bowne has been an operator since 1998 and has been working out out of the Port Coquitlam transit centre for the past 17 years.

Recently Vickie had, what she describes as, the the best day of her transit career thanks to her bus buddy, 10-year-old Aidan (aka her ‘best passenger’) and everyone at the PoCo depot who made HIS day!

Read on about Vickie, Aidan and the best. day. ever.

I first met Aidan about a month ago when he rode my bus.  He then got on again a few weeks later and after discussing things with him and his nurse we arranged to have Aidan tour the Poco Transit Depot.

Once there, the staff in the front office welcomed him. He was given all kinds of fun stuff!

Then the maintenance supervisor showed him the maintenance yard where the buses get fixed. We then walked through the depot and introduced him to quite a few drivers, some who knew him. He was sure in his element! 20160727_133933

He talked about wanting to work here someday. Said he could empty the fare boxes as a job, or work with computers. I told him he definitely could do anything!

When I had to get to Coquitlam for my second piece of work, Aidan was not tired and asked to join me.

When we went out to Poco Station, my transit Supervisor got him a private ride in a shuttle that just happened to be deadheading there. Aidan loved the ride in the Community Shuttle bus.

Then Aidan boarded my #152 and rode that route and stayed on for my #151 back to Coquitlam where he insisted he wanted to ride the bendy #701 bus home. We made sure that happened.

Thank you to all the drivers who introduced yourself to him! He was talking about many of you later on in the day.

Oh, and I am happy to say that according to Aidan, I am the best bus driver! Yup, and then his next comment “I am your best passenger, right?” You sure are, Aidan! Also I am suppose to print out a picture of him and I together and put it on my desk. Too cute.

What a gift to the world he is. I am blessed to call him friend.


What does Vickie love about transit?  For her, it’s all about the connections she makes!

“As a driver I love the interaction with the people that ride our buses.  I have seen kids grow up, new refugees figuring out the bus routes, many seniors struggling to get by, and many that have passed away.  The connections we make affect their lives and I just hope that if they ride my bus it is in a positive way.”

Author: Adrienne Coling

49 detour ending September 5!

Good news, 49ers! (The riders of the route, not San Fran’s team)

The City of Vancouver sewer main construction and road work along Marine Drive is almost complete. And that means…the 49 will go back to its regular route!

On Monday, September 5, the 49 will service the following as part of its regular route:

  • 49th Avenue between West Boulevard and SW Marine Drive;
  • SW Marine Drive between 49th Avenue and Dunbar Street; and
  • Dunbar Street between SW Marine Drive and 41st Avenue.

An added bonus, on weekends, the 49 will now be sporting full articulated buses (see above photo) giving customers more options to travel to UBC.

We appreciate your patience during the City’s construction work.

Don’t forget! Fall service changes also go into effect September 5. Visit for more details.

Author: Jessica Hewitt

Links and Tidbits – August 26, 2016

Links and tidbits is our semi-regular roundup of interesting fodder about transportation from the last few weeks or so. If you have links to contribute, put them in the comments, or email us.

Interior view of a panda-themed subway train of subway Line 3 in Chengdu city, southwest China's Sichuan province, 31 July 2016. A train full of Panda elements ran from Taipingyuan stop at 8:30 am on Sunday (31 July 2016), marking the official opening of the first phase of subway line 3 in Chengdu city, Southwest China's Sichuan province. During the initial operation of subway line 3, the trains operated from 6:30 am to 10:50 pm by charging passengers in accordance with their travel distances. With 2 yuan ($0.3) as the base rate, the line's total 17 stops, covering 20.3 km, cost only 4 yuan. The operation hours will be adjusted in accordance with the passenger flows. "Subway line 3, running through the urban center, will shorten the commuters' one-way travel time to 34 minutes. However, this also means an upcoming traffic burden for the line, which is expected to witness a daily passenger flow of 400,000," said an insider from Chengdu Subway.

»   This ^^ new subway and station in China is sheer panda-monium!

»   What’s on trend for Russian subway commuters? CRAZY! Check out these St. Petersburg residents trying to one-up each other with their commuting attire.

»   ” I couldn’t help it. It just popped in there… It’s the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.” (In Waterloo Station!)

»   This London, Ontario police office is using public transit for his job in a new way. Not a bad idea!

»   I know of a few local SkyTrain and bus fans who could relate to this awesome effort!

»   JUST TAKE MY MONEY! You can buy vintage pieces of MTA assets online!

»   Transit haute couture. Would you wear this?

»   Talk about some crabby commuters.

»   Ew. Boston subway is surely not the exclusive transit home to these microbes but I just don’t want to think about it!

»   There’s been subway pizza rat. Now meet subway bagel and cream cheese rat!

»   Worried you’re missing out on the latest social media fodder on your commute? You could always print it out like this woman!

»   NO. Nononononono clipping nails (toe or otherwise) on transit!

»   From NYC underground subway to a NYC underground park, Mr. Subway Symphony finds a home for his melodic tones.

»   From subway rapper to Netflix star just like that!

»   The Philadelphia subway vent guy saga continues!

»   LA Metro is serious about riders safety! Their new PSAs may showcase stick people, but the effect is real. What do you think? W

»   NYC always gets the cool tech! This StreetEasy map shows the best subway stops for singles.

»   This is real life. Be careful on transit and don’t make decisions like this – for Pokemon or any other reason!

»   Transit riders took a survey about what they want. What they really, really want.

»   Mercedes unveils their self-driving bus. It certainly looks slick! Thoughts?

»   You think your backpack (or others’ bags) are a nuisance on transit? What if you had to carry a 3D printer on your commute?

»   Edmonton bus shelters are going green by installing solar panels!

»   Retired subway trains make for great graffiti art spaces for this interesting festival.

»   MTA is looking to the future. What do you think of the proposed changes?

»   I would LOVE this! Although with this new subway strap design, there may be less ‘meetcutes’ on transit!

»   Transit heroes to the rescue again!

»   That must have been one holy ride.

»   Think you know better than MTA planners? Here’s your chance to prove it! Design your own NYC subway system.

»   A personalized portrait of your commute for your very own. What a fun and artistic endeavour!

»   Here’s a list of people who apparently should be BANNED FOREVER from transit. What’s your take? Anyone to add or save?

»   An awesome still-standing and soon to be restored 1916 Rochester subway train is the very last one!

Author: Adrienne Coling