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Translink Buzzer Blog

Transit Police Academy – Week 1

Transit Police on duty screengrab

Transit Police Academy runs until June 24

After my first evening in Transit Police Academy, I have to admit that I didn’t know what I didn’t know until I knew it!

Transit Police was created in 2004 to be the thread that ties all the different jurisdictions in the region together.

They are trained exactly as any other police department and have the power of arrest, have access and ability to share information with other police departments and RCMP and are accountable to many authorities both provincial and federal.

We got a really great example of how Transit Police works in the Lower Mainland.

An incident occurred in a Surrey SkyTrain station with the perpetrator then hopping on the train heading to New Westminster committing another crime on the system THEN getting on again and getting into some more trouble in Vancouver.

Before Transit Police, these incidents caused by a single perpetrator included not one, not two but THREE police departments all with varying degrees of information based on the individual situations in their jurisdiction.

Transit Police streamlines the process and they work closely with municipal police departments as their jurisdiction expands across the entire province!

One of the major concerns I hear from riders, (and hey, I’ve thought it too!) is: “Where ARE the Transit Police? I don’t see them except checking fares!”

The short answer is that they can’t be everywhere at once. Here’s the long answer:

Teams of two try to stay near the system to jump on and off the train if needed to be at emergencies quickly and spend lots of time on and near major bus loops. But they are constantly moving.

The breakdown of time is about 1/3 each for dealing with calls, administrative paperwork and patrolling the system.

A full Transit Police department is 110 officers. Right now, they are at about 103. And yes, they’re hiring if you’re interested!

There are the day and evening shifts with staffing 24/7. Officers are four days on and four days off. The split is about 10 units during the day and 12 (or more) in the peak afternoon and evening times.

However, I think it’s their service delivery model that is particularly interesting.

The new model in place now comes out of an independent report from Simon Fraser University that included surveys, workload analysis, time and motion and predictive analysis.

Transit Police implemented their suggestions to create a hub system.

There are 6 major hubs along the SkyTrain system where Transit Police officers report to and from. These are: Bridgeport, Waterfront, Broadway/Commercial, Metrotown, Lougheed and Surrey Central. There are smaller hubs at many other stations as well.

The hub stations were chosen based on the following criteria:

  • Call density
  • Volume of rail passengers
  • Volume of bus traffic in loops
  • Volume of bus passengers
  • Customer perception of safety

This creates a type of geographical “beat” for officers on the system with zones they patrol allowing them to get to know the neighbourhoods and people.

This week we will be exploring intelligence led policing, communications with their Operations Communications Centre and the On Duty app.

Also, we’ll be looking at the 87-77-77 text line.

FYI! In one year, Transit Police received 31,000 texts with tips and concerns about situations on the system.

I’m genuinely learning a lot and I’m happy to pass that on to you, Buzzer readers. Look out for my new post next week!

The Buzzer has a new contributor: Meet Laura!

Please help me in welcoming Laura to the team!

Please help me in welcoming Laura to the team!

Hello Buzzer Blog readers! I’m the new Student Communication Associate and am excited to be working with the TransLink Communication Team over the upcoming months.

Transit has always had a special place in my heart. In my earlier transit riding days, a bus pass was more than a ticket-to-ride, it represented pure freedom.

It meant no parent chauffeurs, an open road and countless pizza slices at my destination.

My adult self values transit for many of the same reasons. Although less about parents and pizza, the sense of freedom has remained.

Transit gets me where I want to go, reduces my environmental footprint and gives me a chance to relax on my commute.

A transit fan through and through, I am super excited to contribute to this blog and connect with the Buzzer readers!

A few more things about me:

  • I have a background in publishing and I love to read. I’m currently reading Mavis Gallant’s In Transit (total coincidence).
  • Lately, I have been into all foods pickled or spicy.
  • I am a novice gardener learning the ways of plants and soil. So far my struggling basil has kept its ways very secret.

See you all on the blog!

West Coast Express gets Compass!

Compass: our new electronic fare card

West Coast Express will start tapping June 8

You may have noticed on our some of our social channels and in the news yesterday that there was an announcement about Compass.

West Coast Express riders will be the next group of customers to receive the Compass card and start tap, tap, tapping on June 8!

Just a few benefits of using Compass include being able to load money at home, balance checking and protecting your balance if your card is lost of stolen.

By the end of the summer, we will see over 200,000 people using this system!

For more information, check out the video below or take a look at our media release.

Transit in the News – May 15

A weekly section about transit making headlines around the globe. Have an article you want to share? Comment below or email us.newspaper-568058_1280
South Wales “Ride Me” bus advert sparks online backlash.

New bus links Montreal residents with reduced mobility and McGill University Health Centre.

Bolt bus explodes on turnpike in Massachusetts.

Karachi explores mass transit system options for region.

Public hearing set on Massachusetts transit plan.

Mumbai Metro Rail Corporation receives bids from 9 consortia for Metro III project.

Transit referendum deadline for requesting ballots today.

New Kitchener Crosstown bus starts in September.

Compass Card rolls out to TransLink’s West Coast Express service and students.

Beijing police warn flash mobs on subway may cause stampedes.

  If you’re looking for interesting facts and fun stories about transit, check out our monthly Links and Tidbits series.

Adrienne goes to Transit Police Academy

Police Academy

I heart Mahoney!

“All right, you scrawny beanpoles, becoming a cop is NOT something that happens overnight. It takes one solid weekend of training to get that badge” – Chief Wiggum

All kidding and Simpsons quotes aside, I am always impressed by the level of dedication and training police officers have and Transit Police is no exception!

They provide a vital service for our system and our region.

Believe me, they do far more than just write fare infraction tickets. This is a full-fledged police service!

Have you ever wanted to know more about the ins and outs of Transit Police? Me too!

So, every Wednesday evening (starting tonight) until the end of June, I’ll be attending a TransLink initiative for employees called Transit Police Academy.

I will be learning about how they police the system, tactical responses, investigation procedures and lots more.

My goal in participating is to better understand what they do, why, how and pass that knowledge onto you, the rider (and reader).

The agenda for the first week:

  • Service Delivery Model
  • Community Policing
  • Transit Watch Program (Surrey)
  • Chief’s Community Counsel
  • Police Board

I will be posting about my experiences at Transit Police Academy each week so stay tuned for all my updates!

Bike to Work Week is May 25-31!

Grab your helmet and your wheels and let's ride!

Grab your helmet and your wheels and let’s ride!

For some, the idea of biking to work is attractive but also a bit intimidating. What’s the best route, what to wear… and who else will join me?

That’s why there’s Bike to Work Week each spring and fall! It’s the perfect opportunity to try out cycle commuting in a fun, friendly and rewarding way.

This spring Bike to Work Week is May 25-31 and registration is free at BikeHUB.ca.

When you create your account and log your bike trips, you become eligible to win over $15,000 in amazing prizes, including a trip for 2 to Europe! The more you bike, the greater your chances of winning.

To cheer you on and help you out along the way, TravelSmart and HUB are sponsoring over 50 celebration stations across Metro Vancouver, where you can load up on free coffee, snacks, maps, bike service, and encouragement!

You can register for Bike to Work Week on your own but it’s even more fun with a team of coworkers! Get together with some of your colleagues and register as a team for a chance to win extra prizes.

HUB provides tons of resources to help promote Bike to Work Week at your workplace.

Use the TravelSmart map to find bike routes around your home and workplace.

Keep in mind that you don’t have to bike the whole way and you don’t have to bike every day. The important thing is to get your body moving and have fun!

Don’t forget to stop by the FREE Bike to Work Week Wrap-Up Party and BBQ at Creekside Park on Friday, May 29th from 4pm-7pm.

Visit TravelSmart and BikeHUB to learn more about the health benefits of cycling and for tips on getting started.
Remember – whatever the weather, ACTIVE is better!

The Facts Matter: How TransLink contributes to the Region

TransLink invests in YOUR community

TransLink contributes across the region

I’m back with another post for The Facts Matter!

I’m going to continue to highlight some of the areas and projects in the region where TransLink has contributed to roads, cycling and, of course, transit.

This week is Delta and Richmond.

Take a look at just some of the investments from 2012-2015 in these areas.

Richmond

  • Road widening on Westminster Hwy (Nelson Rd. to McMillan Way) -$1,234,250
  • Installing traffic detection systems at six Steveston Hwy. intersections – $111,000
  • Bike route improvements along Ash St.  (Granville Ave. to Williams Rd.) – $133,500

Delta

  • Building a bike lane and improving street lights on Ladner Trunk Rd. (64 St. to 72 St.) – $88,000
  • Intersection improvements at River Rd. and Huston Rd. – $557,000
  • Road widening of Ladner Trunk Rd. (Hwy. 17 to 64 St.) – $424,500

Each municipality has their own fact sheet and you can see what’s been done in, and being planned for, your community’s future.

Head to The Facts Matter page to find out more ways TransLink has has contributed to transit, roads and cycling.

You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.

Construction is starting at New Westminster Station!

Upgraded station entrance off Carnarvon Street

Upgraded station entrance off Carnarvon Street

New Westminster Station is integrated into the mixed-use development beside and around the station. As the neighbourhood around the station continues to grow and develop, the station requires updates to better meet the needs of SkyTrain customers. Construction is beginning at the station. Read on for important details about the project and what you can expect!

What’s happening?

The upgrades, which are expected to be complete by summer 2016, will improve accessibility, capacity, safety and security at the station. The project includes:

  • Replacement elevator and escalators to improve access for customers.
  • Improved lighting and signage throughout the station.
  • Glass panels that replace the existing mesh screens to improve station visibility from street level.
  • Better integration with the surrounding community to make it easier to connect to and from the SkyTrain system.

What can I expect?

Our top priority is the safety of the public, passengers, employees, and contractors. Due to the nature of construction activity, we recognize there will be impacts to the public, including noise and changes to station access.

Below is a summary of the key project phases and expected impacts. For ongoing information about construction impacts associated with the project, visit www.translink.ca/ontrack. Please note that timelines are subject to change based on construction activity.

Phase 1: East and West station access – spring 2015-summer 2015

Construction crews will focus on replacing the east escalator and upgrading the stairs, at the Eighth Street entrance, and the west escalator and stairs by the bus loop. Painting and the installation of new window glazing will also begin at platform level, and the emergency exits at the north and south sides of the platform will be painted.

Impacts:

  • Station access from Eighth Street will be closed. Passengers will be redirected to the Carnarvon Street entrance.
  • The escalator and stairs from the bus loop to the concourse level will be closed. Passengers will be redirected along McNeely Street to the Carnarvon Street entrance, or through the parkade to the existing moving walkway that provides access up to the concourse level.
  • Platform widths will be reduced in some areas to allow for painting, window installation, ceiling replacement and new lighting.
  • Hoarding in the concourse area to allow for new ceilings, lighting and painting.
  • Noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating, is expected to begin in several weeks. Notifications will be sent in advance of particularly noisy work.

Phase 2: Eastbound and westbound platform access – summer 2015-fall 2015

Construction crews will focus on replacing the escalators and upgrading stairs to the eastbound and westbound SkyTrain platforms from the concourse level. Replacement of the south elevator, which provides access to the eastbound platform, will also begin.

Painting and installation of new window glazing at the platform level is expected to be completed in this phase.

Impacts:

  • Passengers traveling eastbound and westbound can access the platforms via the Plaza 88 escalators and stairs.
  • Passengers requiring the use of an elevator to access the eastbound platform can use the Plaza 88 elevator, by the cinema from the parkade west of the bus loop at street level, or by the cinema at the concourse level.
  • The north elevator to the westbound platform will be in service.
  • Hoarding in the concourse area to allow for new ceilings, lighting and painting.
  • Neighbours can expect noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating. Notifications will be sent in advance of particularly noisy work.

Phase 3: Concourse area upgrades – fall 2015-summer 2016

Construction crews will complete the replacement of the south elevator and begin upgrades to the concourse area.

Impacts:

  • Hoarding in the concourse area to allow for new ceilings, lighting and painting.
  • Neighbours can expect noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating. Notifications will be sent in advance of particularly noisy work.

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Thanks for your patience as we complete these much-needed upgrades to New Westminster Station! For more information, including FAQs and information boards, visit www.translink.ca/newwestminster.

Congratulations to the Graduating Class of 2015!

Let GradPass take you there!

Let GradPass take you there!

Every graduating Grade 12 student attending school in the TransLink transportation service region is eligible for a GradPass.

This means you can enjoy two free days of unlimited travel including bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express!

That’s right, FREE!!!

Here’s how to use it:

Grab your pass from your school, either through your homeroom or the principal’s office.

When you get your GradPass, sign the back of it right away because you are the only person eligible to use it.

You validate your pass by scratching off the grey panels for the day and month of travel before you board.

The pass must be used with your student GoCard.

Keep in mind that your GradPass is valid for any two days (non-consecutive) between May 15 and June 30, 2015.

Do your part, TravelSmart!

Choose active and sustainable modes of transportation like walking, biking and transit.
By traveling smart you’ll save money and help our environment.
Check us out at TravelSmart.ca, on Facebook and Twitter

Transit in the News – May 8

A weekly section about transit making headlines around the globe. Have an article you want to share? Comment below or email us.newspaper-568058_1280

Community Services in Nova Scotia cuts some bus passes for people with disabilities.

35 bus shelters in Calgary were shattered in wave of vandalism over the weekend.

Hearing for public-private partnership for mass transit in Guam.

Regina, Saskatchewan is getting rid of their rush hour bus-only lanes.

Government in Perth, Australia propose high-frequency bus lanes to reduce congestion.

Edmonton LRT starts training for staff.

Metropolitan Manila Development Authority asks Department of Transportation for express bus-only lane on elevated highway.

Sudbury, Ontario partners with Google to create online transit planner.

MTA wants $1B from NYC for Second Avenue subway.

The public gets a sneak peek at what Kitchener-Waterloo LRT stations will look like.

Obama administration approves ferry to Cuba from Florida.

An all male committee will oversee Toronto’s transit decisions.

Massive transit strike cripples Germany.

STM may lose control over planning of transit projects in Montreal.

Students want to be testers of Edmonton’s smart fare technology.

GO transit launches summer service to Barrie and Niagara.

Hamilton can’t stop stores from overcharging for bus tickets.

35% of ballots returned in Metro Vancouver for plebiscite.

  If you’re looking for interesting facts and fun stories about transit, check out our monthly Links and Tidbits series.

BC Parkway – Find your way with new wayfinding signs!

The new look to wayfinding signs along the BC Parkway

The new look to wayfinding signs along the BC Parkway

See what I did there? So clever!

Old BC parkway wayfinding sign

One of the old BC Parkway signs

If you are curious as to what wayfinding actually is, well, so was I before I started at TransLink!

The basic process of wayfinding involves four steps: orientation, route decision, route monitoring and destination recognition.

It’s essentially a decision making process related to navigation. The decisions we make are influenced by what we sense, our experience and the information we can obtain. Like signage and maps.

If you’ve been a part of the region for more than a few years, you may have noticed some of these sign changes around the transit system.

TransLink is continually implementing wayfinding enhancements as part of existing capital projects, routine maintenance or as specific opportunities arise.

Speaking of opportunities, the BC Parkway is one!

The BC Parkway is a 26-kilometre, multi-use path that connects Surrey City Centre, New Westminster, South Burnaby and Vancouver.

178  new signs are currently being installed along this path. These signs are designed to help everyone better understand the route.

History lesson time!

The BC Parkway was introduced just ahead of the Expo ’86 celebrations.

A new sign out on the BC Parkway

A new sign out on the BC Parkway

The creation and maintenance was (and still is) a partnership between BC Transit (now TransLink) and the municipalities along the route.

TransLink is upgrading BC Parkway as we speak!

This includes some renovation and maintenance work like lighting, crossing safety improvements and accessibility improvements in different areas along the route.

Here are a few of the changes:

  • Realignment of the BC Parkway, away from darker areas and bushes and closer to the road at Nanaimo Station, and along Slocan and Rupert streets.
  • New lighting on parts of the parkway in Vancouver, New Westminster and Surrey for increased visibility for BC Parkway users.
  • A new designated route at Nanaimo and Patterson stations to separate cyclists from vehicles and pedestrians.
  • Widened and paved paths with new ramps replacing steps at Slocan and Rupert streets. This improves accessibility for parents with strollers, people in wheelchairs/scooters and cyclists.

Just because I love old flyers and the like, check out an excerpt from the brochure that was distributed in the region at the time with a shot of the very first signs on the path.

BC Parkway brochure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be sure to take a look at our guidelines for bicycle wayfinding to stay up to date on our regional cycling strategy and keep your eyes peeled for the new signs as you’re cruising on your bike!

My Jane’s Walk experience: A Walking Tour of SE False Creek

Jane's Walk 2015It was a beautiful day on May 3rd when I headed out with my basset hounds to a Jane’s Walk in False Creek.

It WAS a beautiful day, until I ended up in a pond! Ok, that’s the end of the story, let me back up a little.

I hope some of you (or lots of you!) got a chance to participate in this year’s series of walks around Metro Vancouver.

Our leaders for the walk were Sabrina and Ian who work for TransLink and BCRTC, respectively. I have to admit, I didn’t know much about this area of False Creek and Olympic Village area other than, well, the Olympic athletes stayed there. I found out that it is a lovely community with various amenities, interesting public art and a rich history!

We started at Creekside Community Centre. I was tempted to just sit in the sun, enjoying a beverage at Tap & Barrel but we pressed on!

In 1978, False Creek was a mix of railway tracks, lumber mills and factories. That was until BC politicians decided to host a small transportation exhibition called “Transpo ’86″ to sync with the centennial of Vancouver and the 100th anniversary of the transcontinental railway reaching Vancouver.

This teeny little expo exploded into a a world’s fair and what we now look back fondly as just Expo ’86. Just to give you a little perspective, they were expecting a maximum of 14 million people. They got 22 million! SkyTrain is one of the lasting contributions from Expo ’86 along with BC Place stadium, Science World and Canada Place.

Our next stop was Main St-Science World SkyTrain station, currently under construction. This station was the first of many to begin a facelift. As our stations are around 30 years old, it’s about time! It includes the bike parkade, public art, prototype newspaper containment systems, retail and decorative lighting. The final changes will be made to this station in the next few months to be done by the end of this summer.

Just down the path you can see the Pacific Central train station. It houses… guess what? TRAINS! This was built in 1919 for the Canadian National Railway. CN passenger trains were transferred to VIA Rail in 1978. Today, one of the most popular train trips is from here to Seattle.

Just to the North of the station is the property which will become the new site for St. Paul’s Hospital.

The Trans Am Totem by Marcus Bowcott is quite striking to see up close. Until this walk, I had only seen it from the SkyTrain on my way to or from downtown.

It’s part of Vancouver’s “Open Air Museum” from the 3rd Vancouver Biennale exhibition allowing access to all and to hopefully create “unexpected and global inspired cultural experiences where people live, play, work and transit.” This piece, according to the artist, is a metaphor that uncovers an unpleasant darkness in our society while revealing the emotional bankruptcy that results from our dependence on cheap, consumer goods.

You can also see the viaducts from this vantage point and it turns out the Georgia viaduct is for more than just filming the Deadpool movie! Along with the Dunsmuir viaduct, it was opened in 1972 that replaced a structure built from 1913-15.

The update was supposed to create a series of expressways in the downtown core. An idea that didn’t quite come to fruition. However, 43,000 vehicles and 2,000 bicycles use the viaducts every single day.

Hogan’s Alley was the local and unofficial name for Park Lane, an alley that ran through the southwestern corner of Strathcona until the 1960s. Most of the area was destroyed by the 1970s for the construction of the viaducts. Only one landmark of that area still remains and the Jimi Hendrix shrine on the corner of Union and Main. His grandmother lived in Vancouver and Jimi spent many a summer in the area.

Next, we rounded back, passing our origin and continued to Olympic Village Square. Let me tell you, it’s for the birds! No, seriously, have you seen the giant sparrows? Apparently, they are European. C’est bon, es ist toll, es genial, è fantastico! The art is from Myfanwy MacLeod and inspired by Alfred Hitchcock’s film, “The Birds.”

Then came the wetlands. Here’s where it all started to go wrong…

So, the park area with yes, wetlands, open green space, children’s playground, dog runs and the continuation of bike and walking paths is unofficially known as Hinge Park. The area is a combination of historical references to the former City Worksyard site with the creation of a naturalized wetland environment.

As I was trying to take a picture of the group, oops! It just slipped and I wasn’t fast enough. Phone. Pond. Ker-plunk!

I didn’t hesitate! I let my country girl roots kick in. Shoes and jewelry off and in I went! Unfortunately, the area closest to the phone’s watery grave was covered in bramble so I had a ways to go actually IN the water. It was cold. It was gross. There were ducks. People stared. You can see the final picture below I got from Sabrina. I suffer for this blog!

BUT! I got my phone, it worked (a modern day miracle) and I saved all the pictures from the day! And thanks to the fruit inspired manufacturer, let’s call them… “Banana,” I got a replacement phone for my rapidly fritzing, waterlogged one.

Because I was rather soggy, I missed the final stop, the Brewery Creek region. Luckily, my colleagues provided me with their notes!

Way, way, back this area was covered in dense, dark rainforest with many indigenous flower and berries used for First Nations medicine and food.

Later on, it was still defined by its landscape, with slaughterhouses, the nearby Vancouver Tannery and breweries including San Francisco Brewery, Mainland Brewery, Landsdowne Brewery, Lion Brewery and the Thorpe & Co. Soda Water Works.

Inspired by hops and barley past, there is a movement for areas call Craft beer urbanism. Yep. It’s a thing! Craft breweries and smaller distilleries and wineries are a part of a still growing trend in urbanism that helps define place making opportunities and local identity.

Last, but certainly not least, was the Salt Building (now home to Craft Beer Market) built in 1930. The original 13,000 square-foot space worked with the Bay Area salt trade in San Francisco where unrefined salt was shipped to Vancouver for processing and extraction. It is one of the last buildings in the area that harkens back to the industrial heyday of Vancouver.

That’s all folks! It was an interesting and enlightening day. I’m very glad, despite what I’m dubbing the new Watergate, I was able to understand more about some of the communities and neighbourhoods in Metro Vancouver. Although next time, I’ll have someone else take the photos, or have a wrist strap!

Construction is starting at Metrotown Station and Bus Exchange

Summary of station upgrades at Metrotown Station

Summary of station upgrades at Metrotown Station

Summary of bus exchange upgrades at Metrotown Station

Summary of bus exchange upgrades at Metrotown Station

Metrotown Station is one of the oldest and busiest stations on the Expo Line and has long been in need of upgrades to improve accessibility, capacity, safety, and security. Site preparation works have been underway since January 2015 and more construction activity is beginning this month. Below is some important information for you about the project and construction!

What’s happening?

The upgrades, which are expected to be complete by fall 2017, will  provide additional capacity that is required for our growing region. Improvements include:

  • New escalators, stairs and elevators to improve access for customers with disabilities.
  • More space on the platforms to enable the system to expand for future customers, particularly as the region grows.
  • Updated design features to improve safety and security for all our customers.
  • Better integration with the surrounding community and bus exchange to make it easier for people to connect to and from the SkyTrain system.
  • A 75-bike Secure Bike Parking facility similar to the one at Main Street – Science World

What can I expect?

Our top priority is the safety of the public, passengers, employees and contractors. Due to the nature of construction activity, we recognize there will be impacts to the public, including noise, traffic impacts and changes to SkyTrain service and station access.

Below is a summary of the key project phases and expected impacts. Please note that timelines are subject to change based on construction activity.

Phase 1: Centre Stationhouse Construction – early 2015 – spring 2016

Construction crews will focus on building the new Centre Stationhouse, including new elevators and stairs.

Impacts:

  • As of February 26, 2015 and continuing until spring 2016, the elevator at Metrotown Station is out of service while we build three new elevators and the new Centre Stationhouse. See OnTrack for more details.
  • The emergency staircase will be removed and a temporary staircase will be provided as a replacement in a nearby location.
  • Noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating, is expected to begin in several weeks. Notifications will be sent in advance of particularly noisy work.
  • Passengers can expect minor SkyTrain and bus service adjustments.
  • Drivers and pedestrians can expect temporary traffic impacts, road and sidewalk detours.

Phase 2: West Stationhouse Construction – summer 2015 – summer 2016

Construction crews will focus on building the new West Stationhouse at ground level, extending the platform level at the west end to provide for the new escalators, and installing four new escalators.

Impacts:

  • Neighbours can expect noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating. Notifications will be sent in advance of particularly noisy work.
  • Passengers can expect minor SkyTrain and bus service adjustments.
  • Drivers and pedestrians can expect temporary traffic impacts, road and sidewalk detours.

Phase 3: East Stationhouse Construction – spring 2016 – fall 2017

The existing East Stationhouse will close spring 2016 to allow construction crews to rebuild the structure, extend the platform level at the east end to provide for the new escalators, and install the four new escalators and the new Bike Parkade.

  • Passengers will be re-directed to the new Centre Stationhouse or West Stationhouse once it is complete in summer 2016. There will also be minor SkyTrain and bus service adjustments.
  • The passerelle to Metropolis at Metrotown will not be functional; passengers travelling to or from the mall and existing bus exchange will cross Central Boulevard at ground level.
  • Neighbours can expect noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating. Notifications will be sent in advance of particularly noisy work.
  • Drivers and pedestrians can expect temporary traffic impacts, road and sidewalk detours.

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For more information, you’ll want to read the Metrotown Station & Exchange Upgrades FAQs and our latest information boards. Passengers can stay up-to-date throughout construction by visiting translink.ca/OnTrack.

Links and Tidbits – May 1, 2015

Links and tidbits is our semi-regular roundup of interesting fodder about transportation from the last few weeks or so. If you have links to contribute, put them in the comments, or email us.

 Kindness is everywhere!

»   Take a ride on the SkyTrain in 1988!

»   I want this to happen. Who else wants this to happen? Let’s do it!

»   Looking for a spot to sit in the morning? Here are the best subway lines in NYC to actually find a seat!

Nope nope nope nope NOPE!

»   Why take the bus when you can slap on some goggles and virtually take the bus! Wait, what?

»   Hipsters unite! This bus/mobile record store is cruising around Calgary.

»   I’m a sucker for animal stories. Hey, aren’t we all? See how Keiko, a wandering Husky finds her way home with some help from a bus driver in Halifax.

»   Talk about good karma. This bus driver will surely be up for some of that!

»   Not to mention this bus operator in our own backyard of Delta.

»   Russian commuters band together to save a trapped woman in Moscow Subway.

»   Up for learning some new dance moves? LyveTyme dancers in NYC perform on the subway system despite the threat of arrest!

»   Yikes! Talk about a near miss. This man must have some awesome upper body strength and quick reflexes!

»   Like some of Vancouver buses, Thunder Bay, Ontario is looking jazz up their buses with some local art.

Oh, I really feel fine driving route 99!!

»   Explore the deep with this video of a sunken bus. Does it creep anyone else out that you can’t see five feet in front of the camera?

»   For $68 you could own this fabulous old transfer shirt made by local Vancouver designer, Tayman!

»  Peace, love and electric VW vans, man.

» Heading to the Big Apple soon? Be sure to check out these adventures you can have at the end of subway lines.

Keanu Reeves: Canadian, The One, a totally triumphant and bodacious dude and subway gentleman supreme.

»   Japan’s maglev train breaks world speed record. AGAIN!

»   More metro dance parties? Oui, s’il vous plaît!

»  Ever wondered why so many public transit systems use a grid pattern? Wonder no more! Don’t say I never gave you anything. (See what I did there? I gave you knowledge!)

Skip to 2:25 for an awesome subway-inspired dance on Dancing with the Stars!

The Facts Matter: Transit, Roads and Cycling in your Community

TransLink invests in YOUR community

TransLink contributions across the region

$145 million dollars. That is a big number and can be a tad difficult to interpret. So, let’s break it down a bit further.

Last week we looked at contributions TransLink has made in Burnaby and New Westminster since 2012. This week, Surrey and Langley are up!

Here are just a few of the projects and investments in these areas:

Langley

  • Fraser Hwy. road widening (228 St. to 23500 block) – $ 2,716,000
  • New bike lanes on 48 Ave. (20400 block to 210 St.) – $209,000
  • Introduction of new 96 B-Line service linking Guildford and Newton via Surrey Central Station

Surrey

  • Widening 16th Ave. (crossing over Hwy 99) and building bike lanes in both directions – $ 4,655,895
  • First phase of the Surrey Lake Greenway (140th St. to Coopershawk Crt.) -$185,700
  • Introduced new express service (555 Port Mann Express) across the Port Mann Bridge linking Carvolth Exchange, Fraser Heights/Guildford and Braid SkyTrain Station.

Each municipality has their own fact sheet and you can see what’s been done in, and being planned for, your community’s future.

Head to The Facts Matter page to find out more ways TransLink has has contributed to transit, roads and cycling.

You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.