ALERT! More info
Translink Buzzer Blog

Search: bus route buzz

Update on the Downtown Bus Service Review

TransLink and the City of Vancouver have partnered to develop a shared vision for the downtown bus network

TransLink and the City of Vancouver have partnered to develop a shared vision for the downtown bus network

Final recommendations resulting from the Downtown Bus Service Review are now live! How did we get here?

First, we identified a long-term vision:

The downtown bus network effectively and reliably connects downtown neighbourhoods and enables convenient transit connections to the broader city and region. The downtown transit network is consistent and easy to understand, with clear communication of temporary detours associated with road closures and special events.

Second, we listened to you and developed a list of priorities to guide how we achieve the network vision for the local bus network in downtown Vancouver. In the next one-to-five years we plan to do work in two focus areas:

Immediate: implement over the next one-to-two years

  • Extend the 6 Davie/Downtown to connect the West End, Yaletown and Gastown.
  • Consolidate the C23 Davie/Main and C21 Yaletown/Beach services.
  • Determine route for the 5 Robson/Downtown to improve consistency and reliability, based on an expected City of Vancouver decision regarding frequency and duration of road closures of the 800-block of Robson Street.

Near-term: complete once funding becomes available or in some cases conduct further analysis.

  • Simplify city-wide/regional transit services (3, 4, 7, 8, 200s) on eastern corridors.
  • Review design of the 17 Oak/Downtown following implementation of changes to the 5 Robson and 6 Davie.
  • Improve service reliability and customer experience.

Stay tuned for consultation opportunities in the future where you’ll have another chance to weigh-in on these recommendations!

Anyone who missed our earlier posts on this process can read more about it (1), (2) and (3). Thanks!

Author: Angela Salehi

The September 2015 issue of the Buzzer is now on the system

Much of this issue is dedicated to Fall service changes that began September 7th.

There’s also information on Compass Card and upcoming bus anywhere with one-zone fare changes.

Details on International Walk to School Week (IWALK) can also be found in this issue.

And as always, we have our favourites – Contest Corner and Coming Events!

Happy reading! Pick it up today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or you can download it here.

The next regular issue of  the Buzzer will be out in December 2015!

Author: Laura Tennant

Vancity Buzz’s Deputy Editor Kenneth Chan tells us why he loves transit

buzzer_header_ilovetransitKenneth Chan is the Deputy Editor and Social Media Manager of Vancity Buzz. He is known for his articles on public transit, urban design, development projects and the local economy. On the side, he is the Co-Founder of the Vancouver New Year’s Eve Celebration Society, the non-profit organization that will be hosting a major public New Year’s Eve bash in downtown Vancouver at the end of this year. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram.

Kenneth on a sunny day in Vancouver and not far from Waterfront Station.

Kenneth on a sunny day in Vancouver and not far from Waterfront Station.

“Always hold onto the hand rail, grandson.” That’s something my grandma would often say during the many times we descended down the famously long and steep escalator at Granville Station. Looking back, there was always an unexplainable childhood fear of falling and creating a domino-like tumble effect.

I was only about four or five years old at the time, but those SkyTrain trips to Chinatown and Metrotown are some of my most vivid early memories of taking public transit in Metro Vancouver. That’s how I started to become familiar with public transit, eventually growing to love it as a teenager, coupled with the endless hours I spent playing Sim City and trying to replicate the New York and Metro Vancouver regions.

I grew up near UBC and eventually studied there as well, so I’ve always understood and appreciated the conveniences of living close to a cluster of public transit services as well as school and work.

But the introduction of the 99 B-Line, which complemented the high number of local bus routes that already serve near my house, was the real game changer in making public transit a truly feasible, quick and cost-effective way to get around. This was compounded by the launch of other routes and services over the years – first the now-defunct 98 B-Line and then the Canada Line – that enabled a speedy transfer to other destinations and connections.

I’ve used public transit in dozens of other major cities, and I can confidently say that our region already enjoys a highly developed transit network that punches above its own weight when considerations are given for our relatively small population and comparisons are made with the systems found at other similarly sized North American urban regions. Is there room for improvement? Of course there is, but some context is always important.

Public transit’s feasibility as a primary mode of transportation depends on a combination of factors such as speed, frequency, convenience and network size. The larger the service area with quick transit services that are competitive with driving times and the associated high costs of car ownership, the greater the ridership haul.

A case in point is how the automobile became such a flexible and attractive mode of transportation in the Post-War years. Road networks grew exponentially in size over decades, making driving an easy way to get around.

The same case can also be made when the network size of other modes grow and improve. Vancouver is now one of the most walkable cities in North America following years of ambitious city-wide pedestrianization prioritization efforts, and a similar level of accessibility is now being attempted for cycling through a number of ambitious bike infrastructure initiatives by both municipal governments and TransLink.

In a similar way, it became exponentially more attractive to use public transit in Metro Vancouver after the opening of the Canada Line. I would even go as far as saying the Canada Line helped spark a ‘transit revolution’ of sorts; this major extension of SkyTrain, the backbone of the public transit network, drastically changed our perception of public transit and its place in the region.

Today, we want more transit and we want it now. Prior to the Canada Line, we were arguably indecisive and uncertain about transit expansion, but it’s now a ‘no brainer’ (apart from the ongoing question of how we’re going to pay for it).

With the opening of the Evergreen Line next year, imagine being able to travel from Lougheed to Coquitlam in about 15 minutes or from VCC-Clark to Coquitlam in about 35 minutes, with trains arriving every three minutes during the day. And with a potential underground extension of SkyTrain to UBC along the Broadway Corridor, imagine being able to travel from UBC to Coquitlam in just under one hour on a transfer-less one-train ride.

Transit expansion opens up so many more possibilities for the region, for where people live, work and play. Furthermore, it should be noted that these macro-level considerations are absolutely vital given just how geographically tiny and constrained the Metro Vancouver region is, to the point that our limited size demands a highly efficient transportation system that simultaneously molds efficient land use and is a catalyst for smart, dense development projects.

At the same time, the economic feasibility of a transit service is dependent on the population and employment density found along and near the route of the service. Roads, parking lots, and urban sprawl take up room that Metro Vancouver does not have – without infringing on our vast areas of agricultural land reserves, protected regional parks and forests, and other sensitive ecosystems. These are all spaces we love and take for granted.

There are negative repercussions to affordability and the economy as well as our social, health and well-being if we do not build our relatively young region in the most efficient manner.

And it all comes back to having an efficient transportation system. This is why I love transit.

Author: Laura Tennant

A history of the 14 Hastings in Vancouver: an interview with planner Peter Klitz about the iconic bus route

A Brill trolley with the BC Hydro colours, operating as the 14 Hastings in 1967.


Repost: Written by Jhenifer Pabillano and originally published April 7, 2011.

During our April 2011 service changes, we brought back the 14 Hastings trolley route—an iconic former bus route that ran through Vancouver’s downtown for many years!

The 14—which even had a famous play named after it—makes its triumphant return to the streets due to optimization changes for the 10 and 17 trolley routes.

Here to tell us more about the 14’s history and its current incarnation is Peter Klitz, one of TransLink’s planners involved in the project. Read on for more insights and some classic photos of the 14 through time!

Read more »

Pender Street bus reroutes will be starting next Monday!

reroutes2

Starting next Monday, August 10th, buses running along Pender will be rerouted onto Hastings St. The reroute, due to water main construction, is expected to last approximately 10 months.

So if you ride the #4,#7, #19,#22,#209,#210,#211,#214, N8, N15, N19, N22, N24 or the N35 take note of these reroutes!

#4 & #7:
Westbound – Regular route to Main and Powell then left on Main, right on Hastings, left on Granville, and then continues on regular route.

Eastbound – No change.

#19:
Westbound– Regular route to Main and Pender then left on Hastings, left at Richards, right on Pender and then continues on regular route.
Eastbound – Regular route to Pender and Homer then left on Homer, right on Hastings, right on Main and then continues on regular route.

#22:
Westbound – Regular route to Gore and Pender then continues along Gore, left on Hastings, left on Burrard, continue along Burrard and turn right on Hastings.

Eastbound – Regular route to Pender and Hornby then left on Hornby,  right on Hastings, right on Gore and then continues on regular route. Note: the #22 Eastbound will no longer be able to use stop #50076 and the signage will be changed accordingly.

#209 – #214:
Westbound – Regular route to Main and Powell then left on Main, right on Hastings, left on Howe, and then continues on regular route.

Eastbound – No change until construction reaches Pender (we will be sure to update you before this reroute takes effect!).

N8: Regular route to Hastings and Granville then left on Granville, right on Pender, and then continues on regular route.
N15: Regular route to left on Seymour, right on Hastings, right on Cambie, and then continues on regular route.

N19:

Westbound— Regular route to Main then continue Main, left on Hastings, left on Howe, and then continues on regular route.
Eastbound— Regular route then left at Seymour, right on Hastings, right on Main, and then continues on regular route.

N22: Regular route to Hastings then right on Granville, right on Pender, and then continues on regular route.

N24: Regular route then right at Burrard, right on Hastings, right on Cambie, and then continues on regular route.

N35: Regular route to Hastings then left on Granville, right on Pender, and then continues on regular route.

Have questions? Let us know in the comments section!

Author: Laura Tennant

Bus Operator Bronco Hyrman receives 100th commendation!

Bronco

“Good evening folks, it’s 18 degrees and it looks like we’re in for a beautiful sunset!” This is something you might hear over the loudspeaker if Bronco Hyrman is behind the wheel.

A bus operator at Coast Mountain Bus Company for the last eight years, Bronco is known for his mini-news update when leaving a bus exchange. Often researching current events and weather before his evening shift (he drives highway routes between Bridgeport and Tsawwassen and White Rock), Bronco’s energy and personal pizazz has made him a passenger favourite. But don’t take it from me, here’s what a customer had to say:

“He greeted every single person that got on the bus with a smile and lots of energy. After such a long day coming from work, it was super sweet to a see a very positive individual make a change just by smiling and having a great attitude. He made me feel special and greeted every single person differently and thanked everyone when they got off! He made this bus ride a great experience for me and others and I really hope you let him know his work was greatly appreciated!”

Guess how many commendations like these Bronco has received? As of this May, he’s had 100!

But Bronco isn’t in it for the awards. He just wants to give his riders the best possible trip.

Here’s how he sees it:

“I like to make the drive pleasant, entertaining and make it a nice experience. I greet everybody. Shortly after I started driving I realized how we can affect people’s experience on the bus – we can make their day start or end on a good note.”

Recently, Bronco took some time to fill us in on what it’s like behind the wheel.

Q: Being on the front lines is a tough job. How do you stay so positive?

A: Knowing people appreciate what I do keeps me going. I used to perform onstage and feed off the environment. Seeing people in a good mood is a great reward. It’s worth it to put the effort in.

Q. What do you do when you come across people who are negative?

A. If customers are negative due to an issue with transit, I explain to everyone over the PA what the issue is. I see it through the passenger’s perspective. I believe in a human factor – show some empathy and you feel for them and know what they are going through.

If I see someone running for the bus I wait when I can and when it’s safe to do so. It isn’t always possible, but it gives us that human touch instead of calling everyone TransLink.

During our interview we also learned that in addition to English, Bronco speaks basic German, Russian and is fluent in Czech!

We should have asked him if he plans on giving news updates in all four languages during tourist season!

We’ll just have to wait and see.

Thanks for giving it your all, all of the time, Bronco!

Author: Laura Tennant

A celebration of 125 years of transit… with a vintage trolley bus!

buzzer_banner_125_years

vintage trolley bus

This summer, you’re invited to join our celebration of 125 years of public transit in BC!

And wow, do we ever have a lot to to celebrate!

Transit in the region has come a long way since the first streetcars rumbled through Vancouver’s core in 1890.

Just look at how our system has expanded over the years to meet the growing population.

Following our initial trolley bus and rubber-tired bus fleets of early days, when the SeaBus hit the scene in 1977 our system began carrying more passengers to the North Shore.

Then the SkyTrain cruised in a few years later for EXPO 86 with The Millennium Line following hot on its heels in 2002.

And then the Canada Line infrastructure further grew our system for the 2010 Winter Olympics.

Now, the Evergreen Line is set to expand our transportation network even further to the east.

So, all in all, it has been a busy 125 years!

In honour of this special anniversary we have a few things up our sleeves to mark the occasion…including free rides on a vintage trolley bus!

This Sunday, an old 1954 Canadian Car-Brill  trolley bus (originally acquired by BC Electric Railway
Company) will be brought out of retirement to give passengers a free ride to designated downtown stops.

Sunday’s vintage trolley bus route! The bus is running from 11am to 3pm, picking up and dropping off at stops marked on the map.

Running from 11am to 3pm, the old trolley will tour on a 30 minute schedule from these stops:

  • Southbound from Victory Square –
    Cambie St at Hastings St, stop #50410
  • Burrard Station – Burrard St at Melville St, stop #50043
  • Burrard St at Robson St, stop #50045
  • Davie St at Howe St, stop #50011
  • Seymour St at Pender St, stop #61519
  • Waterfront Station – Cordova St at Richards St

A couple of TRAMS BC volunteers will also be on board, so if you have questions about the trolley or just want to chat about transit history, these guys got you covered.

Please note, the trolley is not accessible for passengers with disabilities.

Over the upcoming weeks we will continue to celebrate 125 years of transit, so stay tuned for special interviews, archival photos and more!

Author: Laura Tennant

The April 2015 issue of the Buzzer is now on the system

The April 2015 issue of the Buzzer is now on the system!April-2015-Buzzer

Much of it is dedicated to the Spring Service changes that begin to take place on April 13.

There are seasonal and permanent changes to routes AND times so be sure to check out all the updates.

There is information on the Transportation and Transit plebiscite and station and elevator upgrades at Metrotown station.

We’ve also included a new series about TransLink and its operating companies called The Facts Matter.

As always, we have our favourites – Contest Corner, Back Issues and Coming Events!

Happy reading! Pick it up today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or you can download it here.

The next issue of the Buzzer will be out in June 2015.

***CORRECTION***
The URL found for The Facts Matter is incorrect. The full URL is: http://www.translink.ca/en/About-Us/The-Facts-Matter.aspx

We apologize for any confusion to our readers and riders!

Author: Adrienne Coling

Trolley buses: a historical transit lesson

The 14 Hastings streetcar: looking north on Granville from Robson, 1950. Photo by Vic Sharman.

The 14 Hastings streetcar: looking north on Granville from Robson, 1950.
Photo by Vic Sharman.

When I moved out here from Toronto nearly two years ago now, one of the first things I did was explore the city. How, you ask? On the bus! So I hopped on a bus to adventure around my new city.

At least, I thought it was a bus. It had large, yellow tubes attached to wires overhead. It reminded me of my streetcars on the TTC… but no tracks. What a strange beast this was. I was informed by a fellow rider that the beast was, indeed, a trolley bus! Huh. Who knew?

But how long has it been around and why do we use it? Being a former journalist and the daughter of a history teacher, I needed to know the answers.

Trolley buses have been in operation in Metro Vancouver since 1948 and the first routes were replacements for the old streetcar routes in the region.

We actually have 188 40-foot conventional and 74 60-foot articulated New Flyer E40LFR low-floor trolleys operated by the Coast Mountain Bus Company. That means we have the second largest and most modern electric trolley fleet in all of North America!

Trolley buses in downtown Vancouver.

Trolley buses in downtown Vancouver.

Each trolley utilizes a network of overhead wires that span 315 kms through Vancouver and Burnaby. Because we’re using electricity, it’s a very environmentally friendly transit option. Yay for greener transportation!

You can still see a few of Vancouver’s first trolley buses manufactured by the Canadian Car and FoundryJ.G. Brill Company. They have been preserved by the Transit Museum Society out of CMBC’s Surrey transit centre. Namely, a 1947 T44 No. 2040 and a 1954 T48A Nos. 2414 and 2416.

If you’re as interested as I am in this cool vehicle hybrid, check out the Edmonton Trolley Coalition for pictures and information on trolley buses from around the world.

Feel free to impart this historical transit trivia to fellow riders the next time you take a trolleybus!

Author: Adrienne Coling

Buzzer illustrator interview: Christel Chan

 

FebChris

Christel with her illustration for the February Buzzer

Another Buzzer issue means another ridiculously talented artist illustrated the front page! Christel Chan captured our theme for the February issue perfectly, showing the modes of transit we use across the region in a really bright and fun way! (Jealous. I can barely draw plausible stick figure!)

We got a chance to ask Christel a few questions about herself and her work:

Who is Christel?
I am a fourth year Illustration student at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. My website is christelchan.weebly.com.

How did you get into drawing and illustrating?
I’ve been drawing all my life so I cannot really pinpoint a time when I “got into it”. However, I wasn’t aware of Illustration as a field until I started at Emily Carr University.

What’s your favourite thing to draw?
Portraiture. I love studying faces and capturing them in 2D…it is very satisfying.

What tools do you like to use?
Recently I have been very interested in oil painting, but for a more graphic approach, I like using my tablet on Adobe Illustrator. Both media are very flexible which I enjoy.

What’s your favourite route or mode of transit?
I take transit everyday to and from school. Since efficiency is important to me (I am from Hong Kong, after all), the 99 B-line is my favourite bus line because it’s frequent and fast.

What’s next for you in the land of art?
I am graduating this May and I aspire to be a freelance Illustrator for publications and children’s books. I would also like to cultivate a gallery practice.

Thanks Christel! Pick up your copy of the February 2015 issue today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or download it here. The next issue of the Buzzer will be out April 2015 – that means the next illustrator interview will be then too!

Author: Adrienne Coling

The February 2015 issue of the Buzzer is now on the system

The first issue of the Buzzer in 2015 is now on the system!Feb-2015-Buzzer

Much of it is dedicated to the information regarding the Transportation and Transit Plebisicite taking place from March 16 through until May 29th of this year.

Transit Police are changing the way they patrol the system. Customers can expect to see more officers at major stations and they will be basing their patrols from the busiest stations and bus loops.

There’s also information about some things to keep an eye out for on the system. One is the new high visibility vests you’ll see our SkyTrain attendants sporting. Another is the prototype bus safety barrier that will be on select routes out of the Burnaby Transit Centre.

CelticFest and Cherry Blossom Festival will be in full swing this spring and you can find the all details in this issue.

TravelSmart encourages us all to make a change for good by choosing active and sustainable transportation more often. The great photo included in this section is by Steve Chou. You can see the full, colour version and what the TravelSmart booth looks like here.

As always, we have our favourites – Contest Corner, Back Issues and Coming Events!

Happy reading! Pick it up today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or  download it here. The next issue of the Buzzer will be out in April 2015.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Spot the Bus Barrier – the next step in the pilot begins

Look closely. There's a bus barrier on the bus!

Look closely. There’s a bus barrier on the bus!

 

As reported in the media here, here and here, we are working with BC Transit, Unifor 111, Unifor 333 and WorkSafeBC to determine the best design for a safety barrier that will be most effective in preventing assaults on CMBC Transit operators. Check out an earlier announcement on other measures we are taking to prevent operator assaults.

We know you must have some questions – here are five queries asked and answered:

What is a transit operator safety barrier?

Safety barriers are a physical barrier typically made of a hard and transparent material composed of plastic and/or glass. The barrier enables a physical separation between driver and passengers while providing clear sightlines and the ability to verbally communicate with passengers.

Why is CMBC trying out a pilot barrier program?

The safety of our employees and customers is our top priority. Assaults on operators are unacceptable, and can put the lives of many people at risk.

How are operators participating in the pilot?

We are providing operators with a first-hand opportunity to experience the barrier prototype and provide feedback on the design.Feedback from operators will be collected over the next six months and then analyzed. This information will be used tohelp refine the design of the barrier and determine the best approach in protecting our operators from physical attacks.

Where can I see the barrier prototype in service?

The bus will be driven at various times and on various routes.

How can customers provide feedback on the barrier prototype?

Customer feedback is being gathered through all the usual channels. If you have questions or comments to share, contact Customer Relations through the online form or by phone at          604-953-3040 on weekdays from 8 am until 8 pm.

 

Author: Angela Salehi

Buzzer illustrator interview: Hazel Cheng

The December 2014 issue of the Buzzer's illustration done by Hazel Cheng!

The December 2014 issue of the Buzzer’s illustration done by Hazel Cheng!

Oh, look what do we have here – another Buzzer illustrator interview! We were lucky enough to have Emily Carr University of Art + Design student Hazel Cheng illustrate the December 2014 issue of the Buzzer.

‘Tis the season of giving and Hazel really captured that for us in her illustration. Throughout the month of December, our Reindeer Bus and Community Shuttle has been out and about spreading the holiday cheer. On December 18, the bus will be delivering toys to the Lower Mainland Christmas Bureau agencies as part of our annual Toys for Tots charity drive.

Hazel was nice enough to take time out of her busy schedule to answer a few questions about herself and her work:

Who is Hazel Cheng?
I am an illustrator living in Richmond. My website is hazelcheng.weebly.com.

Tell me about the work you do.
Right now, I am working through a children’s book that deals with some struggles of immigration. It’s something that has come to my attention recently after a trip I made this year.

What’s your favourite thing to draw?
A recurring subject in my art are animals, usually small and fuzzy ones.

Do you take transit? If so, what’s your favourite route or mode transit?
Yes, I enjoy taking buses that I’ve never taken before, and going to far away places. I like the routes on the highways, speeding past the farmland with the mountains in the background.

What’s next for you?
Graduating university, and then I’d like to keep on telling stories.

Thanks for your time Hazel! Pick up your copy of the December 2014 issue today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or download it here. The next issue of the Buzzer will be out February 2015 – that means the next illustrator interview will be then too!

Author: Allen Tung

The December 2014 issue of the Buzzer is on the system

December 2014 BuzzerThe final issue of the Buzzer in 2014 of now on the system!

Much of it is dedicated to the winter service changes, which begin on Monday, December 15. Highlights include 10 new stops for the 116 to better serve Burnaby’s growing Big Bend industrial area, new trips and bigger vehicles on select routes to reduce overcrowding and serve more customers.

Winter is coming – December 21 to be exact! We’ve already had our first taste of snowfall and more could be on the way, so we have some tips on how you can stay up-to-date and navigate your winter commute.

What’s a sure sign of the holiday season in the Lower Mainland? Sightings of our Reindeer Bus and Community Shuttle! They are now out and about spreading the holiday cheer throughout Metro Vancouver. Tweet us your pictures and post them to Instagram using the hashtag #ReindeerBus!

On December 6 and 13, in exchange for a new unwrapped toy, you get a ticket to ride the West Coast Express Santa Train! The holiday season is also wonderful time for celebration and Transit Police has tips on how you can stay safe.

There’s also information about holiday transit service! Christmas Day and Boxing Day will operate on a modified Sunday/holiday schedule to better reflect demand. As always, rides will be free on New Year’s Eve from 5 pm until the end of service. New Year’s Day service will be a normal Sunday/holiday schedule.

Starting on December 6, Train2Main will no longer operate, which means you can take any train to Main! The Burrard Otter II made its maiden voyage on December 1. As always, we have our favourites – Contest Corner, Back Issues and Coming Events!

Happy reading! Pick it up today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or download it here. The next issue of the Buzzer will be out in February 2015.

Author: Allen Tung

TransLink 101: What is an express and pick-up/drop-off only bus?

TransLink 101 blog feature series banner

We’re going back to basics again with TransLink 101—explaining TransLink and its operations!

One of our buses carrying an 'express' designation

One of our buses carrying an ‘express’ designation

Express and pick-up and drop-off only are both stopping procedures for our bus routes.

“Express for the most part in the Lower Mainland really means limited stop. There are large gaps between the bus stops, such as on the three B-Line routes,” explains Katherine McCune, Manager of Service Planning at Coast Mountain Bus Company.

“These buses stop at major transfer points for customers, but do not stop at every stop located on the corridor. They offer a travel advantage over local service.”

Bus routes, such as the 160 and 503, are pick-up and drop-off only provide directional express-type service.

“Both these routes offer local stops along a portion of the route to collect customers and then at a point they become express and only drop off at major transfer points,” Katherine says.

“The reverse trip only picks up on the return trip. This ensures that customers to a particular area will have space on the bus to get there. Customers in the area the bus is travelling through are then encouraged to use the local services already available so they do not fill the bus and exclude those customers that are destined for the terminus.”

Katherine continues, “For example, someone wanting to go from Surrey Central to Clayton Heights has several travel options to get between the two locations. A customer from Aldergrove to Surrey Central does not have the same options and has only the one bus to rely on.”

What does it mean when I see an ‘Express’ designation on a route such as the 135 or 49?

“The buses are programmed to show 135 SFU / Burrard Station, but some operators like to add the express to make sure customers are aware that it is slightly different from a regular route,” Katherine says.

The 135 is different because it serves local stops between Simon Fraser University and Renfrew Street in Vancouver, but beyond that, it becomes a limited stop service all the way to Burrard Station.

On the 49, select trips are an ‘Express’ because they do not serve the Champlain area on 54th Avenue. These are extra trips put in to allow us to better serve and meet the demand of Langara College and the University of British Columbia during the school year.

Still have questions about why your bus says ‘Express’ on it? Ask our awesome drivers!

Author: Allen Tung