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Translink Buzzer Blog

I Love Transit Week 2016 is coming! Register for kids camp!

transit_camp_2015The week we’ve all been waiting for is almost here! I Love Transit Week is taking place from August 29 to September 2, 2016.

This is a week dedicated to all of the things that we love about Transit – like that time Jarred and Nina tied the knot on the bus or when Annie and Mike got married on the 351 Crescent Beach!

We’ve also celebrated transit through poetry, LEGO, and more!

This year, we have a bus load of fun transit love to share with you, but first we’re excited to announce that I Love Transit Kids Camp is back for its third straight year!


Kids! Join us for I Love Transit Camp!

I Love Transit Camp is a once in a lifetime opportunity for kids between the ages of 8 and 12 to get a behind the scenes look at TransLink operating companies’ facilities.

Kids will learn about how transit works and have some fun at the same time! Check out all the fun that was had in 2014 & 2015.

This year’s camp is taking place on Thursday September 1st.

The plan

Meet at Gilmore Station for 9 a.m. then hop on a bus and ride to Burnaby Transit Centre (BTC)!

BTC is home to little known transit operations such as fleet overhaul, where they fix and update almost everything on a bus, including the painting of buses and reupholstering of seats.

We’ll also get a tour of the bus yard with articulated and 40-foot buses!

After that, we’ll have a little lunch then say goodbye to BTC.

Next, we’ll hop on SkyTrain and head to Edmonds Station and walk down to where SkyTrain Operations and Maintenance Centre (OMC) live.

At OMC, campers will get a behind the scenes look at the facility where SkyTrains are maintained and cleaned as well as visit SkyTrain Control! They will also get a chance to use the SkyTrain simulator, ask questions of SkyTrain staff.

Finally, a visit with Transit Police and Transit Security to tell us all about everything they do. I’m told they’ll be bringing their vehicles and a special guest if we are lucky!

We’ll wrap the day up around 4 p.m.

Throughout the day we’ll be taking breaks for fun games and more!

How to take part

Due to safety concerns for both OMC and BTC, we’re only able to take a maximum of 20 people in the camp. That means 10 kids (ages 8-12) and their guardians will be able to participate in the camp.

Interested in a fun day on transit? If you’d like to participate, we’ll need potential transit campers to tell us (in 50 words or less) what they love about transit!

If you like, you can also submit a photo and/or a video as part of your entry. Before you or your little one starts typing or writing, you’ll want to read the participation guidelines.

Send your submissions to with “I Love Transit Camp Kids” in the subject field, or you can mail it to The Buzzer, 400 – 287 Nelson’s Court, New Westminster, BC, V3L 0E7.
Be sure to include the following:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Where you heard about the camp
  • The phone number and name of the guardian you wish to bring with you

The deadline for submissions is August 22.
If you are selected, participation forms are due BEFORE August 26.

Looking for some inspiration for your submission? Check out some past successful applications.

We’re looking forward to learning about why you love transit and to seeing you at camp!

Author: Sarah Kertcher

Update: Check out our awesome pics from the 2016 I Love Transit camp!

SeaBus is pretty fly with its new WiFi!

Thousands of passengers travel between downtown Vancouver and the North Shore each day by our beloved SeaBus.

Since December these riders have been able to enjoy Shaw Go WiFi at both SeaBus terminals and now everyone will be able to surf the web right ON the SeaBus!

Did you know?

From launch in December 2015 until the end of July 2016, SeaBus riders have used over one million megabytes of data on the ShawGuest network alone!

Not a Shaw customer? No problem!

You can easily access Shaw Go WiFi by selecting ShawGuest from the list of available WiFi networks.

For Shaw Internet subscribers who’ve used Shaw Go WiFi before you’ll be automatically connected.

You can read more about this great partnership and connectivity in the media release here.

Happy surfing!

Author: Adrienne Coling

Some tweaks to the Next Bus SMS service

Next Text Promo

You can still text to get your bus timings however, how you send and receive SMS information from the service is changing slightly .

What’s new

From August 15, 2016 onward, you will need to text the stop number AND a bus route number in order to receive the next two departure times.

You must include a bus route number in your request in order to get times.

How does it work?

Text the bus stop number and bus route number to 33333 (example: 54440 240) and within seconds, you’ll receive the next 2 departure times for that bus route at that stop.

If you need times for multiple bus routes that service your stop, enter the stop number and up to two bus routes, and text 33333 (example: 50585 44 84).

You’ll get the next 2 arrival times for each bus route in separate texts. You can only request up to two bus routes per text.

If three or more bus routes are listed at a stop and you want times for all of them, an additional text message will need to be sent (example: 54446 240 246 and 54446 241).

Departure times

The predicted departure times are based on the GPS location of the buses and update approximately every two minutes, but sometimes only scheduled times will be available.

Scheduled times are marked with an asterisk (*). When a service is cancelled, we’ll indicate the time with a “C” – same as today.

Need help?

As always, you can text “HELP” to 33333 for assistance.

Remember! Next Bus is also available on our website. So, you can get departure times and all of the route and stop information provided for you on your mobile device or computer.

For more information on the Next Bus SMS service, you can visit our website.
Have questions on the go? Tweet @TransLink or call us at 604.953.3333.

Be a Mark III VIP and ride the new SkyTrains before anyone else!

Mark III and its older sibling, Mark II

Mark III and its older sibling, Mark II

Ok. This. Is. It.


The Mark IIIs are here, tested and ready for service but just before they’re available to all riders, we want to give you (yes, you!) a chance to get on that train first!

What you’ll get

  • A unique Mark III transit pin
  • A Mark III VIP certificate
  • An detailed tour of the train by BCRTC’s Director of Engineering Assets
    AND…. *drumroll please*
  • Have a guaranteed seat aboard the very first Mark III ride with passengers

The big day will be on August 18, 2016 with activities beginning around 11:15ish a.m. at Waterfront Station – the first ride will be after a public open house and media event.

How to enter

This one is simple!

Tell us why you should be a Mark III VIP.

Email us with your videos, poems, songs, photos or anything else you can think of with the subject line “Mark III VIP” to enter. The more creative, the better!! :)

Be sure to read the contest rules found here.

We will choose the most innovative and awesome entries to win one of 20 spots for this much-anticipated event!

All entries must be submitted before 11:59 p.m. on August 15, 2016.

More details of the event will follow for the lucky winners.

Please note: All entrants must have a Compass Card or Compass Ticket to enter the Fare Paid Zone.

Have contest questions? Comment below!

Author: Adrienne Coling

Biking to the ferry: A transportation planner’s journey

Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal (BCIT)

Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal (Courtesy of BCIT)

Island season is most definitely here! Before the summer slips away *tear* we have some adventure ideas for all of you cycling enthusiasts and budding bikers!

Read on to learn some routes that you can take to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal that have been collected and expertly researched by avid cyclist and TransLink Assistant Transportation Planner, Denis Agar.

One of the most incredible things about living in Metro Vancouver is that we have beautiful wilderness right on our doorstep. There are a number of exciting destinations to explore on the transit network, and even more are just a short BC Ferries ride away.

Did you know that a bike can take you from one tip of Salt Spring Island to the other in just 2.5 hours?

Even beginner cyclists can enjoy low-stress cycle touring on the Gulf Islands and Vancouver Island, with plenty of campgrounds and B&Bs available to spend the night.

While BC Ferries charges up to $115 round trip to bring your car to the islands, they charge just $4.00 round trip to bring your bike aboard.

The only part that can be a little challenging is getting to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal with your bike.

All of TransLink’s buses are equipped with bike racks which can make it easier and faster to get to the ferry terminal, but these buses only carry two bikes at a time, which can be a challenge at peak times.  But don’t worry, because you have alternatives!

So, if you’re trying to get to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal with your bike, here are some options worth considering.

*All hypothetical trips start at Waterfront Station to make comparison simple*

Richard Eriksson

Courtesy of Richard Eriksson

Bus route 620 direct to Ferry Terminal
Route 620 is your direct route from Bridgeport Canada Line station to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal. It’s timed to connect with the ferry to Swartz Bay (Victoria) and at busy times, up to three buses can be scheduled to meet the same ferry departure! At peak times, it can be difficult to predict whether there will be room for your bike on the bus, because of the high levels of demand. The following two alternatives are more reliable, and they also leave from the same station!

Bus route 601/602/603/604 to 56 Street and Highway 17
Your next best option is to take one of the four bus routes that go from Bridgeport Station to the village of Tsawwassen. You’ll want to get off the bus at the corner of 56 Street and Highway 17, and bike west on Highway 17’s bike lanes for roughly 20 minutes to get to the ferry terminal.

Bus route 351 to Matthews Exchange
Although this option takes longer, two key factors make it a stress-free choice:

  • The extremely frequent route 351 is unlikely to leave you behind, and if it does, it’s only 15 minutes to wait until the next bus.
  • The 60 minute ride from Matthews Exchange to the ferry terminal is breathtakingly beautiful, along the Boundary Bay Dyke.
Heather Harvey

Courtesy of Heather Harvey

Massey Tunnel shuttle
This option involves a free shuttle that takes you from one side of the Massey Tunnel to the other. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure operates this service, which can carry up to seven people and bikes at a time, making it ideal for cycling with big groups. If there are more than seven people waiting, the shuttle will come back ASAP to pick them up.

If you want to take this shuttle but don’t want to bike all the way from your home to the shuttle stop, you can take the Canada Line to Richmond–Brighouse Station and ride to the shuttle pickup point from there.

Bike across the Alex Fraser Bridge

Courtesy of Pete

Courtesy of Pete

If you want to bike all the way from your home to the ferry terminal, your closest bike-friendly crossing is the Alex Fraser Bridge between New Westminster and Delta. That’s more than a three hour trip, but there are a number of ways you can shorten it:

  • Take the SkyTrain from Vancouver to 22nd Street Station and bike from there.
  • At 22nd Street Station, you can also catch the 340, 388, or 104 buses that will take you right to the foot of the bridge at the corner of Cliveden Avenue and Hwy 91 off ramp.
  • On the other side of the bridge, you can catch the 640 bus at the corner of Nordel Way and Nordel Court, which will take you to Ladner.
  • At Ladner Exchange, you can catch one of the buses from options one or two that will help you on your way.

For more details on each option, click here.

If you encounter any issues with this information, or if anything has changed, let us know in the comments!

Author: Denis Agar

Congrats to our #Compass1Million winners!

A few weeks ago, we hit one million active Compass Cards!

To celebrate we wanted to thank you, our customers, who embraced Compass and use it to tap, tap, tap their way across the system.

Hence the awesome #Compass1Million contest!

We had 500+ entries and the lucky eight chosen at random will receive $50 of Stored Value on their Compass Card and a nifty transit prize pack.

Congratulations to our winners!

Jason – Surrey (Twitter)
Ben – Vancouver (Instagram)
John – Port Coquitlam (Twitter)
Jeannie – Vancouver (Instagram)
Michal – Vancouver (Twitter)
Claire   (Twitter)
Katelyn – Surrey  (Facebook)
Romela – Vancouver (Twitter)

Thank you to everyone who took pictures with us out on the system, shared the photos across social channels and celebrated one million Compass Cards with us!

Did you miss this contest? Fret not!
Stay tuned to the Buzzer blog for many more contests coming up for
I Love Transit, Mark IIIs & more!

Author: Adrienne Coling

CMBC operators-to-be don blindfolds for important training session

Top image

“Approximately half a million Canadians are estimated to be living with significant vision loss that impacts their quality of life, and every year more than 50,000 Canadians will lose their sight. This figure includes people who have no sight from birth, people who are legally blind, as well as people with less significant vision loss.”
– Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB)

Respectful, physical touch helps communicate with those who do not have their full sight

Respectful, physical touch helps communicate with those who do not have their full sight

When you want to become a CMBC bus operator, there are many tests and training sessions you undertake to make sure you’re ready for any and all scenarios you may encounter.

One important training session is centred around the blind and partially-sighted community in Metro Vancouver.

The 18-year-old program is meant to show the challenges and barriers the visually impaired community encounter on public transit. It gives operators ideas and tips of what they can do to help riders with visual impairments.

Steve Muller, Chief Trainer for operators at CMBC, believes this is a training that really sticks with drivers.

“This is definitely a session that operators remember participating in through their entire careers. This is not just an instructor providing the information, but visually impaired customers who actually experience the challenges of the system day to day,” said Muller.

Rob Sleath has been presenting disability awareness seminars to CMBC transit operators as long as the training has existed.

Rob serves on the Board of Directors for CNIB and the President and Chair for Access for Sight Impaired Consumers. He has also been instrumental in helping our transit system become more accessible and usable for those with visual disabilities. I was lucky enough to tag along for his very last seminar at CMBC.

A big part of the training is walking a mile – or at least riding one – in the shoes of someone who faces the challenges of a partially sighted or blind person riding the bus.

Operators (and social media hangers on such as myself) are blindfolded and asked to navigate getting onto the bus, payment, seating and more without the use of their sight and without help from anyone else.

“We put these drivers through a fairly intense exercise. It lets them feel, if only for a moment, what a transit ride is like for someone who is blind or partially sighted, ” said Sleath.

Operators are also taught about the different sight aids used, how to identify CNIB Compass Cards, how to interact with service dogs, how to walk with or guide someone who is blind or partially sighted and how best to communicate.

Feeling our way to the bus front door

Feeling our way to the bus front door

Operators learn that the type of communication is key.

Using clear and directional-based verbal communication gives those without full sight capabilities the opportunity to take transit independently and confidently .

“The difference of an operator saying a seat is 10 steps forward and one step to your left versus using generalities like ‘down a little ways’ or ‘over there’ is huge,” said Sleath.

The audible stop announcements ensure those who have sight impairments are aware of the route and upcoming stops.

Operators are reminded that a noisy bus or open windows may hinder the announcements and to maintain a volume, despite external conditions, that can be heard anywhere on the bus.

Mark McKenzie is a instructor at CMBC and says his own personal experience with this training helped him immensely in the real world situations when he was a bus operator.

“I had a far greater empathy for what they had to deal with [because of the training] and therefore I was more patient and understanding of their needs. Especially when it came to communication and the importance of respectful physical contact such as offering one’s arm to guide a rider as opposed to grabbing someone’s shoulder or hand to forcibly lead them,” said McKenzie.

Have a look at some of the photos from the training:

I think Rob explained the purpose of the training exercise perfectly when he said, “I’m blind but I do everything else that you do in life and on transit, I just do it in a different way. This training helps the operators understand those who do things just a little differently in their transit environment.”

It was my sincere pleasure to participate in this training and to learn, firsthand, what soon-to-be bus operators need to know to be able to serve this community effectively, efficiently and respectfully.

You can find more about TransLink and our Access Transit programs on our website.

Interested in becoming a bus operator? Visit for more information.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Fun Poll: What random acts of kindness have you witnessed on transit?

If you are a regular transit user, you are bound to witness some… interesting scenarios.

For instance:

Other times, transit riders have the unique opportunity to view complete strangers being kind to each other for no other reason than just to be kind.

In this poll, I’ve included transit random acts of kindness I’ve seen during my transit trips.

(I’m calling them TRAK… get it? Consider it trademarked!)

Maybe you’ve seen someone go above and beyond common courtesy and have never had an outlet to sing the praises of the unknown, everyday transit heroes. Now is your chance!

Vote for any and all of the TRAK moments you’ve seen or have done yourself across our transit system!

Don’t see a specific TRAK you’ve? Choose other and comment to let us know all the details.

What transit random acts of kindness have you witnessed?

  • Thanking transit employees (73%, 88 Votes)
  • Offering a seat to another rider (71%, 85 Votes)
  • Helping a lost or confused passenger find their way (58%, 70 Votes)
  • Returning a lost or dropped item (44%, 53 Votes)
  • Paying for another rider's fare (17%, 20 Votes)
  • Other - comment below! (8%, 10 Votes)

Total Voters: 120

Author: Adrienne Coling

B.C. Day weekend events: Davie Street party, Afro-Brazilian Carnaval and Vancouver Pride Parade

Pride Ian Spence

Pride 2015 – Courtesy of Ian Spence

Party time! Excellent!

Pride weekend is upon us and lots of events (Pride-related and more) are taking place this weekend, in and around Vancouver’s West End and downtown.

This means that some buses and Community Shuttles have been detoured or rerouted in that area.

In the heart of the Davie Street Village, dance the night away on July 29 at the annual Davie Street Party happening between Burrard and Jervis.

Affected routes:

2:30 p.m. to 3:00 a.m. (July 30) – 5 Robson/Downtown, 6 Davie/Downtown, C23 Davie, C23 Main.


Can’t get to Rio for the 2016 Olympics? Don’t worry, you can get a taste of Brazil right here in Metro Vancouver!

The 6th Annual Afro-Brazilian Carnaval is this Saturday, July 30th.

Come out to the Granville Strip between Drake and Hastings to experience a samba parade, a live percussion band, capoeira demonstrations and more!

Affected routes:

6:30 a.m. until 9:00 p.m. – 4 UBC, 4 Powell/Downtown, 7 Dunbar, 7 Nanaimo, 14 Hastings/Downtown, 14 UBC, 16 29 Ave Stn. 16 Arbutus, 10 Downtown, 10 Granville, 17 Downtown, 20 Downtown, 50 Waterfront, 50 S. False Creek.

6:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. – 6 Davie and 6 Downtown.

Everybody say love!

The Vancouver Pride Society will be holding the annual Pride Parade on Sunday, July 31!

The parade will run on Robson between Nicola & Gilford then proceed via Denman, Beach and Pacific to Thurlow.

Affected routes:

6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. –5 Robson/Downtown, 6 Davie/Downtown, C21 Beach, C21 Yaletown, C23 Davie, C23 Main,

12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. – 240 15 Street, 240 Vancouver, 246 Vancouver and 246 Highland.

Remember! There is extra service for the last night of the Honda Celebration of Light!

Hey, many of us get a day off on Monday. We should probably do something super fun with it!

If you’re south of the Fraser, check out the annual Holi Colour Festival.

Between 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. head to Lakshmi Narayan Mandir at 8321 140 St in Surrey.

You will experience an explosion of colours – seriously, wear some old clothes – along with music, vendors, food, kids activities and lots of fun!

Celebrate BC Day in Burnaby!

From 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Burnaby Village Museum, enjoy local artisans, food vendors, carousel rides and even a circus school!

What other events and activities do you have planned for this long weekend? Comment below and let us know!

Know before you go! For full detours and maps, visit
Help us plan your transit trip by using Trip Planner.
Have questions on the go? Tweet @TransLink or call us at 604.953.3333.

Author: Adrienne Coling

New buses roll onto routes this summer and fall

New bus_Kevin Plimbley

Pssssst….check out our new buses!

We know that additions to the transit fleet, whether they be buses, a new SeaBus or the much-anticipated Mark III SkyTrain cars are always of big interest to you, our readers and riders.

With that in mind, get ready and get set for some new buses (with allllllllll the info) that have hit the streets and buses on order for the coming months!

Buses on the way

Right now, we’re in the middle of two deliveries of buses:

  • 62 – 2016 Chevrolet/Giradin G5 Microbird cutaway Community Shuttles (16501-16562).

These will be entering service now through the fall.

  • 40 – 40-foot diesel New Flyer Xcelsior buses [XD 40’s](16101-16140) and five West Vancouver Xcelsior buses (1601-1605 ) will be in service by the fall.
  • An additional 26 – 2016 Hybrid Artics are  arriving beginning late this year (16201-16226).

Bonus! All these buses are air conditioned!

More buses will be rolling out of the new Hamilton Transit Centre, opening in September, during the autumn months.

This delivery will be for 51 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) buses [XN40’s] (16001-16051).

Buses delivered

FYBI (For your bus information):

  • 25 – 2012 XDE60, AC equipped, 60’ Hybrid Articulated buses in Richmond, they are the 12000-series buses
  • 17 – 2012 XD40, A/C equipped, 40’ Diesel buses in West Vancouver (1201-1217)
  • 45 – 2014 XN40, A/C equipped, 40’ CNG buses in Port Coquitlam (14000-series buses)
  • 21 – 2015 XDE60, AC equipped, 60’ Hybrid Articulated buses (15000-series buses operated in Burnaby and Surrey, which entered service earlier this year)

There you go bus fans, all the new bus information you can handle for one post :)

Thanks to Juan Sanchez (loyal Buzzer blog reader and transit enthusiast) for his interest in the newest buses in Richmond that sparked this post.

You can check out his photos of the buses in action here.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Added service for the Honda Celebration of Light!


Canada’s fireworks show – August 1, 2015 (Courtesy of GoToVan)

Summer means festivals, getting outdoors more and fireworks!

We are so lucky to be treated to the Honda Celebration of Light again this year!composite_14690452769840

Here are the dates for these sparkling displays:

Saturday, July 23 – Netherlands

Wednesday, July 27 – Australia

Saturday July 30 – U.S. A. (DISNEY!!)

All shows begin at 10 p.m.

To make sure everyone can get to and from these spectacular events, TransLink has added more service for all three nights to accommodate the fireworks at English Bay.

Added service

West Vancouver Transit

West Vancouver Transit will operate additional service go to and from Downtown Vancouver before and after each event. There will be additional 255 Service to Lynn Valley from Dundarave.

SkyTrain Expo/Millennium/Canada Lines will run additional trains beginning mid-afternoon, at near-peak service levels lasting well past the end of the events.

Expo Line: Last train will leave Waterfront for King George at 1:16am, with connections to the Millennium Line at Commercial-Broadway.

Millennium Line: Last train to Lougheed will leave Waterfront Station at 1:11am

Canada Line: Last train will leave Waterfront for Richmond-Brighouse at 1:15am

West Coast Express: WCE will offer a special train on July 30 only, leaving Mission City at 7 p.m., arriving at Waterfront Station at 8:15pm The return train departs Waterfront Station at midnight, arriving back at Mission City approximately 1:15am.

SeaBus will provide extra and extended service for each of the Celebration of Light events.

  • July 23, 27 and 30: We’re extending our 15-minute service until 12 a.m., and then every 30 minutes until the last sailing at 1:22 a.m. from the South Terminal.

Some downtown and West End buses are also re-routing during these times. Full details can be found online here.

Station access

Before, during and after the events, transit stations will be open, but some will have modified access to ensure customer comfort and safety.

Waterfront Station: After 10:30 p.m., Expo and Millennium line customers who do not require an elevator may only access the station from the Howe Street entrance, north of Cordova. All Canada Line and SeaBus customers, and Expo and Millennium line customers who need an elevator, can access Waterfront Station through the Cordova Street entrance. The Canada Line Granville and Hastings entrance will remain fully accessible for Canada Line customers.

Granville Station: Customers can enter the station from Dunsmuir Street only after 10:30 p.m. until crowds have cleared. Also, there will be no access to Expo and Millennium trains heading towards Waterfront Station after this time.

Burrard Station: Bikes cannot be locked at the station entrance from 9 p.m. and should be removed by 10:30 p.m. onwards, until the expected crowds have cleared. Customers will not be able to access Expo and Millennium trains towards Waterfront Station after 10:30 p.m.

**Passengers will not be permitted to board SkyTrain
with bikes after the events until crowds are clear**


Transit Tip!

Don’t wait in line at Compass vending machines after the fireworks!

You can buy your two Compass Tickets (save one for later that night) and top up your Compass Card beforehand to breeze through the crowds after the events!

For up-to-date transit service information including bus re-routes during special events, sign up for Transit Alerts at,
follow @TransLink or call Customer Service at 604.953.3333.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Rogers and Fido customers you are now connected at downtown Expo Line stations


From left to right: Derrick Cheung, Vice-President Strategic Sourcing and Real Estate, Translink; Gord Nelson, Vice-President, Sales, British Columbia, Rogers Communications; Leon Leroux, Director, Network Implementation, Western Region, Rogers Communications; and Guy Akester, Director, Real Estate Program and Partners, Translink.

Exciting news! Today, Rogers announced it has turned on LTE wireless service in the SkyTrain Dunsmuir Tunnel.

TransLink has partnered with Rogers to provide strong LTE connectivity while on the SkyTrain and – the best part is this service improvement is being made with no cost to taxpayers.

Now, Rogers and Fido customers can surf the web, make/receive calls or texts, stream video and music and catch Pokemon all while travelling through the Dunsmuir Tunnel; including Stadium–Chinatown, Granville, Burrard and Waterfront stations.

Here are all the details on the enhanced connectivity on the SkyTrain!

How do you get wireless service in a tunnel?

This type of install is referred to as a DAS or a Distributed Antenna System. Rogers worked tirelessly over many nights to install equipment in the stations and throughout the Dunsmuir Tunnel.

Non-revenue night work was necessary to ensure passenger service would not be disrupted in any way.  SkyTrain staff also provided great support during this installation.

What are the benefits?

Increased access to cellular data and connectivity is important to our customers!

TransLink has engaged industry experts to ensure that we have a reliable and sustainable network in place.

Rogers and Fido customers now have uninterrupted LTE connectivity while travelling along the Dunsmuir tunnel and can browse the web and make calls.  This improves the safety, security and convenience and is part of our continued effort to improve customer experience.

Are there any plans to expand LTE service to other areas or other carriers?

We are finding innovative ways to expand and diversify revenue sources while delivering a service that customers have requested.

Rogers will continue to expand LTE service along the SkyTrain, specifically, the Edmonds, Columbia, New Westminster and Evergreen tunnels. The DAS system has been configured to support additional carriers so we look forward to other carriers also taking advantage of this opportunity to improve LTE connectivity to the public.

Is LTE the same as Wi-Fi?

The two major categories of wireless internet access for mobile devices are cellular wide area networks and Wi-Fi local area networks.

The biggest difference and reason why we are pursuing cellular access is that Wi-Fi is tied to a router and has a limited range to a confined area, approximately 50 to 100 feet, whereas a cellular network provides access anywhere, through your data plan when you’re out of Wi-Fi range.

Thank you to Lea Dam, Real Estate Project Manager for the low down on the new connectivity!

For more information, check out this news release.

Author: Jessica Hewitt

Boundary Bay Airshow flies into Delta this weekend


What’s that in the sky? It’s a bird… it’s  a plane… it’s… oh, yep! It’s definitely a plane!

Many, many planes will be making neck-tilting appearances at the Boundary Bay Airshow this Saturday, July 23!

Some of those include a Lockheed P-38L Lightning, a Nakajima KI-43 Oscar and a Harvard Mk 4 and Mk IIb and more!

Due to this high-flying fun, various road closures will take effect from 10:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. in areas surrounding the Boundary Bay Airport in Delta.

Closures and bus detours

  • Street closures will occur on 64th Street at 36th Avenue for eastbound traffic to 72nd Street, allowing only local traffic. Visitors to the Kings Links Golf Course will also be permitted to proceed. Traffic control personnel will be stationed at this closure.
  • 72nd Street at the 3900 Block will be closed for north bound traffic. Barricades will also be placed at this location not allowing traffic to proceed beyond this point. Traffic control personnel will also be stationed at this closure.
  • Closures will also occur at 72nd Street at Churchill Street with traffic only allowed to proceed eastbound on Churchill Street from this point to the event.
  • 80th Street will not be affected by any closures as this is an access route to the event.

Bus service on route 76 will be detoured from 10:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

For up-to-date transit service information visit, follow @TransLink or call Customer Service at 604.953.3333.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Station upgrade news from Joyce–Collingwood


Rendering of what the station will look like when the upgrades project is complete

As you may well know, upgrades to Joyce–Collingwood Station are underway!

The upgrades will improve accessibility, capacity, safety and security at the fourth busiest Expo Line Station outside of Downtown Vancouver.

Project benefits

  • New elevator and up and down escalators in the east stationhouse
  • Improved station design with better lighting and visibility
  • Better integration with the community for easier SkyTrain connections

Project update

  • The majority of ground-level demolition work is now complete.
  • Installation of concrete columns and footings to support the new east stationhouse is ongoing.
  • Painting work has begun.

Upcoming work

On July 24, 2016, construction crews are switching out the power source at the station. During this time, several bus stops will be relocated from 5:30 p.m. to end of service to in order to give crews the space they need to work. Signs will be installed at the bus loop to direct customers to their stop. Escalators and elevators will also be out of service during this time.

Below is a summary of what customers can expect at the station over the coming months:

  • The east entrance will remain closed until upgrades are complete in fall 2017, when the project is expected to be complete.
  • Steel and roofing work is expected to begin later this summer.
  • Noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating will continue.

Thank you for your patience as we complete these much-needed upgrades to the Joyce–Collingwood Station and stay tuned for additional updates throughout the project.

Contact Us

Have questions? We’re here to listen!

Customer Information: 604.953.3333
Monday to Friday: 5:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday: 6:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Overnight Station Upgrade Customer Service: 1.866.979.0930
Monday to Friday: 12:30 a.m. to 5:30 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday: 11:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

For more information visit:

Author: Jennifer Morland

CMBC defusers provide emotional first aid to bus operators

Video from the Vancouver Sun

A “defuser” may sound like an electronic device but in the context of Coast Mountain Bus Company, it means something much more personal and important.

A CMBC defuser provides what they like to call “emotional first aid” to employees out on the road; they help operators better cope with serious incidents. .

When the volunteers of this program are called, it’s because a driver is in need of help due to a major accident, a passenger assault or even a death.

The internationally accredited program began in 1992 and is very similar to the same resources extended to police and fire service employees after a traumatic event.

Statistics show that people who get “defusing” shortly after an incident have a much better recovery rate.

Dave McKay has been in this vital support position for 15 years and now acts as the program’s coordinator. He says they try and get a defuser out to an operator in need within hours of an incident.

“Right now we have 23 defusers. We like to have anywhere between 25 and 30. We have eight more on the way!”

All defusers are volunteers and initially were only operators but now the positions are open transit employees, including some former mental health workers.

McKay says a defuser needs empathy, listening and people skills and be able to do well in a crisis. The incidents can be very traumatic for operators and defusers are on call during all service hours.

“In these stressful situations we make sure they don’t drive, bring them to a quiet place then we take them through a defusing process which includes international critical stress management.”

And it’s not only the operators that need some support. Due to its stressful nature, all defusers have sessions themselves after responding to 10 incidents.

A defuser may not be a well-known position outside of CMBC but it is a job that makes such a difference in the lives of operators and employees and helps us keep you moving across the transit network.

Author: Adrienne Coling