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Bus stop changes to Richmond-Brighouse Station

Station

Bus stops and bay assignments will be temporarily changing at Richmond–Brighouse Station on Canada Line

**UPDATE**

As of Monday, June 27, 2016 the temporary relocation of the bus stops at this station will be returning to their original spots.

The City of Richmond is conducting work on the plaza by the entrance to Richmond-Brighouse Station.

The work begins on March 28, 2016 and is expected to last several months.

During this time, SkyTrain and bus service will continue to run as scheduled but station access will be partially impacted and some bus stops and bay assignments will shift.

What to expect

Effective March 28, until the end of May, the following bus stops and bays will be shifted along No. 3 Rd:

  • Bay 2 will be moved to the current location of Bay 3
  • Bay 3 will move to the other side of Saba Road and temporarily replace bus stop #56452
  • Bay 3 will serve the same bus routes as before and will now include the C96 and N10 previous serviced by stop # 56452.
  • Signs will be installed at bus stops and the station entrance to direct customers to the correct locations

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We thank our passengers for their patience while the renovations to the plaza by the entrance to Richmond-Brighouse Station are completed.

Author: Jennifer Morland

Capilano Road Bus Detours update

Customer Alert generic busTo accommodate the ongoing Capilano Road water main construction, the 232 Capilano Road route continues to be affected.

Here are the updates and what you need to know:

  • From March 14 to 18, 2016 the 232 will route temporarily via Edgemont Boulevard and Capilano Road on a single lane alternating traffic.
  • The 232 will detour and operate on Eldon Road, Ruby Avenue and Sunset Boulevard between March 19 to April 3, 2016.
  • Beginning on April 4, 2016 the 232 will return to its regular routing via Edgemont Boulevard and Capilano Road.

For more details, visit translink.ca/alerts.

Author: Adrienne Coling

On this day in Buzzer blog history: January 16

oldbuzzerillustration

Welcome to Throwback City. Population: Buzzer blog!

With this series we re-publish some awesome old pieces from days in the Buzzer blog’s history.

Today we look at January 16, 2008. The Buzzer blog was a mere pup, not even a year old!

The Canada Line was shiny and brand new and the Buzzer blog editor at the time took to interviewing two talented photographers who just happened to be the artists behind the largest collection of Canada Line construction photos!

Go back in time and enjoy!


 

Profile: Tafyrn & Seamora Palecloud, Canada Line construction photographers

Author: Jhenifer Pabillano

A double rainbow over the Operations and Maintenance Centre --- one of the many fabulous photos found at Canada Line Photography.

A double rainbow over the Canada Line’s Operations and Maintenance Centre — one of the many fabulous photos found at Canada Line Photography.

For Friday, here’s the second profile in a series on Lower Mainland transit enthusiasts — our first was on the Trans Vancouver bus photo archive.

Look up “Canada Line photos” in Google, and the first hit you’ll get is Canada Line Photography, an enormous repository of terrific photographs chronicling the train line’s construction.

There are two people behind the site, Tafyrn and Seamora Palecloud, who were kind enough to do an interview with me for the Buzzer blog. (And I did ask about their unusual names: Tafyrn just laughed, saying, “As you probably know, it’s good practice not to use our real names on the internet.”)

So, here’s the interview, and sprinkled throughout you’ll find some of the Canada Line photos that Tafyrn and Seamora consider favourites—they link back to related pages from the Canada Line photo blog, too.

Tafyrn, Seamora — thanks again so much for helping me put this together!

Read more »

Buses: The next generation

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The newest member of our bus family

Some cool news for bus fans!

TransLink will soon have 21 New Flyer Xcelsior XDE60 articulated 60-foot buses in our fleet!

Each bus will help TransLink be even greener because they are all diesel-electric hybrids!

Twelve of the new buses will serve routes out of the Surrey Transit Centre (STC) replacing all of the existing articulated buses on the 96 B-Line.

The rest of the buses will call Burnaby Transit Centre (BTC) home and will add to the modernization of the articulated bus fleet in Burnaby.

This includes the 99 B-Line, the 135 and the 44, to name a few!

There are some great new features with these buses, including:

– LED headlights
– A better-optimized seating layout
– Electric doors which provide consistent opening and closing times
– Air conditioning!

Where the rubber meets the road

The artics at STC will start to be in service at the end of January with all of them on the road by March.

At BTC, the new buses will start being integrated onto the routes mid-February with full service in March.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Customer Alert: Capilano Road bus detours extended approximately 2 weeks

Customer Alert generic busAttention all Capilano Road bus goers!

**UPDATE: Winter Service Changes originally scheduled for January 4, 2016, will be delayed by approximately 2 weeks, due to the continued construction of the Capilano Road water main project. During this time, the 232, 236 and 247 will return to regular routing except for the portion of Capilano Road between Edgemont and Eldon.

Check out the detours below! The changes are bolded:

From southbound Capilano Rd:

232 Phibbs Exchange, 236 Lonsdale Quay and 247 Vancouver

Via regular route southbound to Capilano Rd at Eldon Rd, then via Eldon Rd, Ruby Ave, Sunset Blvd, to Edgemont Blvd.  The 236 and 247 continue west on Edgemont Blvd to Capilano Rd, then regular route beyond to Lonsdale Quay (236) and Vancouver (247). The 232 continues east on Edgemont Blvd and regular routing beyond to Phibbs Exchange.

From northbound Capilano Rd:

236 Grouse Mountain and 247 Upper Capilano

Via regular route to Capilano Rd at Edgemont Blvd, then via Edgemont Blvd, Sunset Blvd, Ruby Ave, Eldon Rd, then continue north on Capilano Rd to Grouse Mountain.

From westbound Edgemont Blvd:

232 Grouse Mountain

Via regular route to Edgemont Blvd at Sunset Blvd, then via Sunset Blvd, Ruby Ave, Eldon Rd, then continue north on Capilano Rd to Grouse Mountain.

After this detour ends, the 236 and 247 routes will return to their regular routes along Capilano Rd .

However, the 232 will remain on a minor detour for approximately 2½ months as a result of the closure of Edgemont Blvd at Capilano Rd.

Know before you go!

Head to our Trip Planner to map out your route and times.
Sign up for alerts to stay in the know about any service changes.

Author: Adrienne Coling

New signs make taking the bus a breeze

A wayfinding expert’s rendering of a new bus stop sign and scheduling panel

A wayfinding expert’s rendering of a new bus stop sign and scheduling panel

Starting this month and continuing through the week, bus stop signs in Surrey City Centre are getting a new look!

The design of the new signs, courtesy of TransLink’s Wayfinding experts, display more information and are easier to read.

You’ll also notice something strangely familiar — the new look is consistent with other transit facilities across the system such as SkyTrain stations. The large “T” is for transit (of course!) and will make spotting a bus stop a breeze.

Digital rendering of a new bus stop sign

Digital rendering of a new bus stop sign

Rolling out the new bus stop signs will be a gradual process. To be cost effective, signage and schedules “infotubes” will only be changed out when the existing pieces reach end-of-life or are damaged or require updated route information. The full replacement of all bus stop signs and infotubes will take place over the next few years.

New bus stop signs

New bus stop signs will make it easier for customers to locate bus stops from a distance.

The “T” for transit, route numbers, Next Bus information and the bay number are placed in prominent locations. To differentiate from regular bus service, B-Line information will be highlighted in orange and NightBus in navy blue.

Schedule panels replace infotubes

Many bus stops currently have infotubes on the pole with schedule information, and riders generally give us good feedback about them. Sometimes, however, riders tell us the text is too small. We’re making improvements in this area by replacing the infotubes with schedule panels. The schedule panels are flat, contain larger text and have the same look and feel as the bus stop signs.

Existing infotube (left) and new scheduling panel (right)

Existing infotube (left) and new scheduling panel (right)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keep your eyes open!

If you’re in Surrey City Centre over the next few days, make sure to check out the new signs. There are also a few new ones dotting other areas of the region, so keep your eyes open for them too!

 

 

Author: Jordan Keim 

Out on the roads, spot the reindeer bus!

We spotted the bus today!

Beep beep! Rudolph is running on a route near you!

**Extra points for you if you sang the title to the tune of “Up on the Housetop!”**

‘Tis the season for the reindeer bus and reindeer community shuttle to be out and about on regular routes around Metro Vancouver starting tomorrow for the whole month of December!

reindeer bus

This community shuttle has a very shiny nose!

For 30 years, these decorated vehicles have spread the holiday cheer and surprise passengers with a unique ride throughout Metro Vancouver!

The reindeer bus kicked into gear a little early last week with a visit to Toys for Tots. This year, TransLink and its operating companies have promised 3,000 toys to help make this Christmas extra special for children in our communities!

When they are not out on the road, the reindeer bus calls the Vancouver Transit Centre home.

Head to Twitter where our team will try their best to tweet out what routes the two reindeer will be serving so you can hop on!

Keep your eyes peeled for our reindeer and send us your pictures of it!

Tweet your photos to @TheBuzzer using the hashtag #ReindeerBus, post them onto Instagram mentioning @TransLinkBC and hashtag #ReindeerBus, or email thebuzzer@translink.ca. We’ll be sharing some of our favourites!

Author: Adrienne Coling

Buzzer illustrator interview: Meghan Latta

Illustration-and-illustrator

Meghan and her illustration!

This September issue was all about fall service changes and we were lucky enough to have Meghan Latta illustrate the cover!

Capturing our seasonal shift into autumn, Meghan’s work perfectly depicted our move into fall and the service changes that this time of year brings.

Here’s a brief interview we did with Meghan to learn more about her and her work.

Tell me a bit about yourself

My name is Meghan, illustration is not my day job, but I try to work it in whenever I have spare time.

How would you describe your illustration style?

I usually do things that are pretty detailed and realistic. I have been working on more pattern-focused illustration in the last year.

What inspired your illustration?

I knew that the emphasis of this issue of the Buzzer was going to be about fall service changes, some of which included night bus service, so I wanted to do something about the night and the transition from day into night. I really wanted to include some raccoons, but they didn’t make it into the final design.

Have you ever drawn transit before this gig?

I have not.

Do you take transit? If so, what’s your favourite mode?

I take transit every day! I live in a really well connected part of town, so it is easy to get anywhere from my house, and that is great. I don’t take the Canada Line as much anymore because it is not on my everyday route, but I do really like that train.

Did you have a good summer? Any fun fall plans?

Summer ended kind of abruptly and I am thinking a lot about fall and fall clothes. I’m wondering if I can get away with wearing a blanket around outside all of the time. Also, pie? Pie is in my fall plans. Both the making of and the eating.

Thanks Meghan! If you haven’t picked up the latest Buzzer you download it or find it on the system!

Author: Laura Tennant

Update on the Downtown Bus Service Review

TransLink and the City of Vancouver have partnered to develop a shared vision for the downtown bus network

TransLink and the City of Vancouver have partnered to develop a shared vision for the downtown bus network

Final recommendations resulting from the Downtown Bus Service Review are now live! How did we get here?

First, we identified a long-term vision:

The downtown bus network effectively and reliably connects downtown neighbourhoods and enables convenient transit connections to the broader city and region. The downtown transit network is consistent and easy to understand, with clear communication of temporary detours associated with road closures and special events.

Second, we listened to you and developed a list of priorities to guide how we achieve the network vision for the local bus network in downtown Vancouver. In the next one-to-five years we plan to do work in two focus areas:

Immediate: implement over the next one-to-two years

  • Extend the 6 Davie/Downtown to connect the West End, Yaletown and Gastown.
  • Consolidate the C23 Davie/Main and C21 Yaletown/Beach services.
  • Determine route for the 5 Robson/Downtown to improve consistency and reliability, based on an expected City of Vancouver decision regarding frequency and duration of road closures of the 800-block of Robson Street.

Near-term: complete once funding becomes available or in some cases conduct further analysis.

  • Simplify city-wide/regional transit services (3, 4, 7, 8, 200s) on eastern corridors.
  • Review design of the 17 Oak/Downtown following implementation of changes to the 5 Robson and 6 Davie.
  • Improve service reliability and customer experience.

Stay tuned for consultation opportunities in the future where you’ll have another chance to weigh-in on these recommendations!

Anyone who missed our earlier posts on this process can read more about it (1), (2) and (3). Thanks!

Author: Angela Salehi

The September 2015 issue of the Buzzer is now on the system

Much of this issue is dedicated to Fall service changes that began September 7th.

There’s also information on Compass Card and upcoming bus anywhere with one-zone fare changes.

Details on International Walk to School Week (IWALK) can also be found in this issue.

And as always, we have our favourites – Contest Corner and Coming Events!

Happy reading! Pick it up today on the bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express or you can download it here.

The next regular issue of  the Buzzer will be out in December 2015!

Author: Laura Tennant

Vancity Buzz’s Deputy Editor Kenneth Chan tells us why he loves transit

buzzer_header_ilovetransitKenneth Chan is the Deputy Editor and Social Media Manager of Vancity Buzz. He is known for his articles on public transit, urban design, development projects and the local economy. On the side, he is the Co-Founder of the Vancouver New Year’s Eve Celebration Society, the non-profit organization that will be hosting a major public New Year’s Eve bash in downtown Vancouver at the end of this year. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram.

Kenneth on a sunny day in Vancouver and not far from Waterfront Station.

Kenneth on a sunny day in Vancouver and not far from Waterfront Station.

“Always hold onto the hand rail, grandson.” That’s something my grandma would often say during the many times we descended down the famously long and steep escalator at Granville Station. Looking back, there was always an unexplainable childhood fear of falling and creating a domino-like tumble effect.

I was only about four or five years old at the time, but those SkyTrain trips to Chinatown and Metrotown are some of my most vivid early memories of taking public transit in Metro Vancouver. That’s how I started to become familiar with public transit, eventually growing to love it as a teenager, coupled with the endless hours I spent playing Sim City and trying to replicate the New York and Metro Vancouver regions.

I grew up near UBC and eventually studied there as well, so I’ve always understood and appreciated the conveniences of living close to a cluster of public transit services as well as school and work.

But the introduction of the 99 B-Line, which complemented the high number of local bus routes that already serve near my house, was the real game changer in making public transit a truly feasible, quick and cost-effective way to get around. This was compounded by the launch of other routes and services over the years – first the now-defunct 98 B-Line and then the Canada Line – that enabled a speedy transfer to other destinations and connections.

I’ve used public transit in dozens of other major cities, and I can confidently say that our region already enjoys a highly developed transit network that punches above its own weight when considerations are given for our relatively small population and comparisons are made with the systems found at other similarly sized North American urban regions. Is there room for improvement? Of course there is, but some context is always important.

Public transit’s feasibility as a primary mode of transportation depends on a combination of factors such as speed, frequency, convenience and network size. The larger the service area with quick transit services that are competitive with driving times and the associated high costs of car ownership, the greater the ridership haul.

A case in point is how the automobile became such a flexible and attractive mode of transportation in the Post-War years. Road networks grew exponentially in size over decades, making driving an easy way to get around.

The same case can also be made when the network size of other modes grow and improve. Vancouver is now one of the most walkable cities in North America following years of ambitious city-wide pedestrianization prioritization efforts, and a similar level of accessibility is now being attempted for cycling through a number of ambitious bike infrastructure initiatives by both municipal governments and TransLink.

In a similar way, it became exponentially more attractive to use public transit in Metro Vancouver after the opening of the Canada Line. I would even go as far as saying the Canada Line helped spark a ‘transit revolution’ of sorts; this major extension of SkyTrain, the backbone of the public transit network, drastically changed our perception of public transit and its place in the region.

Today, we want more transit and we want it now. Prior to the Canada Line, we were arguably indecisive and uncertain about transit expansion, but it’s now a ‘no brainer’ (apart from the ongoing question of how we’re going to pay for it).

With the opening of the Evergreen Line next year, imagine being able to travel from Lougheed to Coquitlam in about 15 minutes or from VCC-Clark to Coquitlam in about 35 minutes, with trains arriving every three minutes during the day. And with a potential underground extension of SkyTrain to UBC along the Broadway Corridor, imagine being able to travel from UBC to Coquitlam in just under one hour on a transfer-less one-train ride.

Transit expansion opens up so many more possibilities for the region, for where people live, work and play. Furthermore, it should be noted that these macro-level considerations are absolutely vital given just how geographically tiny and constrained the Metro Vancouver region is, to the point that our limited size demands a highly efficient transportation system that simultaneously molds efficient land use and is a catalyst for smart, dense development projects.

At the same time, the economic feasibility of a transit service is dependent on the population and employment density found along and near the route of the service. Roads, parking lots, and urban sprawl take up room that Metro Vancouver does not have – without infringing on our vast areas of agricultural land reserves, protected regional parks and forests, and other sensitive ecosystems. These are all spaces we love and take for granted.

There are negative repercussions to affordability and the economy as well as our social, health and well-being if we do not build our relatively young region in the most efficient manner.

And it all comes back to having an efficient transportation system. This is why I love transit.

Author: Laura Tennant

A history of the 14 Hastings in Vancouver: an interview with planner Peter Klitz about the iconic bus route

A Brill trolley with the BC Hydro colours, operating as the 14 Hastings in 1967.


Repost: Written by Jhenifer Pabillano and originally published April 7, 2011.

During our April 2011 service changes, we brought back the 14 Hastings trolley route—an iconic former bus route that ran through Vancouver’s downtown for many years!

The 14—which even had a famous play named after it—makes its triumphant return to the streets due to optimization changes for the 10 and 17 trolley routes.

Here to tell us more about the 14’s history and its current incarnation is Peter Klitz, one of TransLink’s planners involved in the project. Read on for more insights and some classic photos of the 14 through time!

Read more »

Pender Street bus reroutes will be starting next Monday!

reroutes2

Starting next Monday, August 10th, buses running along Pender will be rerouted onto Hastings St. The reroute, due to water main construction, is expected to last approximately 10 months.

So if you ride the #4,#7, #19,#22,#209,#210,#211,#214, N8, N15, N19, N22, N24 or the N35 take note of these reroutes!

#4 & #7:
Westbound – Regular route to Main and Powell then left on Main, right on Hastings, left on Granville, and then continues on regular route.

Eastbound – No change.

#19:
Westbound– Regular route to Main and Pender then left on Hastings, left at Richards, right on Pender and then continues on regular route.
Eastbound – Regular route to Pender and Homer then left on Homer, right on Hastings, right on Main and then continues on regular route.

#22:
Westbound – Regular route to Gore and Pender then continues along Gore, left on Hastings, left on Burrard, continue along Burrard and turn right on Hastings.

Eastbound – Regular route to Pender and Hornby then left on Hornby,  right on Hastings, right on Gore and then continues on regular route. Note: the #22 Eastbound will no longer be able to use stop #50076 and the signage will be changed accordingly.

#209 – #214:
Westbound – Regular route to Main and Powell then left on Main, right on Hastings, left on Howe, and then continues on regular route.

Eastbound – No change until construction reaches Pender (we will be sure to update you before this reroute takes effect!).

N8: Regular route to Hastings and Granville then left on Granville, right on Pender, and then continues on regular route.
N15: Regular route to left on Seymour, right on Hastings, right on Cambie, and then continues on regular route.

N19:

Westbound— Regular route to Main then continue Main, left on Hastings, left on Howe, and then continues on regular route.
Eastbound— Regular route then left at Seymour, right on Hastings, right on Main, and then continues on regular route.

N22: Regular route to Hastings then right on Granville, right on Pender, and then continues on regular route.

N24: Regular route then right at Burrard, right on Hastings, right on Cambie, and then continues on regular route.

N35: Regular route to Hastings then left on Granville, right on Pender, and then continues on regular route.

Have questions? Let us know in the comments section!

Author: Laura Tennant

Bus Operator Bronco Hyrman receives 100th commendation!

Bronco

“Good evening folks, it’s 18 degrees and it looks like we’re in for a beautiful sunset!” This is something you might hear over the loudspeaker if Bronco Hyrman is behind the wheel.

A bus operator at Coast Mountain Bus Company for the last eight years, Bronco is known for his mini-news update when leaving a bus exchange. Often researching current events and weather before his evening shift (he drives highway routes between Bridgeport and Tsawwassen and White Rock), Bronco’s energy and personal pizazz has made him a passenger favourite. But don’t take it from me, here’s what a customer had to say:

“He greeted every single person that got on the bus with a smile and lots of energy. After such a long day coming from work, it was super sweet to a see a very positive individual make a change just by smiling and having a great attitude. He made me feel special and greeted every single person differently and thanked everyone when they got off! He made this bus ride a great experience for me and others and I really hope you let him know his work was greatly appreciated!”

Guess how many commendations like these Bronco has received? As of this May, he’s had 100!

But Bronco isn’t in it for the awards. He just wants to give his riders the best possible trip.

Here’s how he sees it:

“I like to make the drive pleasant, entertaining and make it a nice experience. I greet everybody. Shortly after I started driving I realized how we can affect people’s experience on the bus – we can make their day start or end on a good note.”

Recently, Bronco took some time to fill us in on what it’s like behind the wheel.

Q: Being on the front lines is a tough job. How do you stay so positive?

A: Knowing people appreciate what I do keeps me going. I used to perform onstage and feed off the environment. Seeing people in a good mood is a great reward. It’s worth it to put the effort in.

Q. What do you do when you come across people who are negative?

A. If customers are negative due to an issue with transit, I explain to everyone over the PA what the issue is. I see it through the passenger’s perspective. I believe in a human factor – show some empathy and you feel for them and know what they are going through.

If I see someone running for the bus I wait when I can and when it’s safe to do so. It isn’t always possible, but it gives us that human touch instead of calling everyone TransLink.

During our interview we also learned that in addition to English, Bronco speaks basic German, Russian and is fluent in Czech!

We should have asked him if he plans on giving news updates in all four languages during tourist season!

We’ll just have to wait and see.

Thanks for giving it your all, all of the time, Bronco!

Author: Laura Tennant

A celebration of 125 years of transit… with a vintage trolley bus!

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vintage trolley bus

This summer, you’re invited to join our celebration of 125 years of public transit in BC!

And wow, do we ever have a lot to to celebrate!

Transit in the region has come a long way since the first streetcars rumbled through Vancouver’s core in 1890.

Just look at how our system has expanded over the years to meet the growing population.

Following our initial trolley bus and rubber-tired bus fleets of early days, when the SeaBus hit the scene in 1977 our system began carrying more passengers to the North Shore.

Then the SkyTrain cruised in a few years later for EXPO 86 with The Millennium Line following hot on its heels in 2002.

And then the Canada Line infrastructure further grew our system for the 2010 Winter Olympics.

Now, the Evergreen Line is set to expand our transportation network even further to the east.

So, all in all, it has been a busy 125 years!

In honour of this special anniversary we have a few things up our sleeves to mark the occasion…including free rides on a vintage trolley bus!

This Sunday, an old 1954 Canadian Car-Brill  trolley bus (originally acquired by BC Electric Railway
Company) will be brought out of retirement to give passengers a free ride to designated downtown stops.

Sunday’s vintage trolley bus route! The bus is running from 11am to 3pm, picking up and dropping off at stops marked on the map.

Running from 11am to 3pm, the old trolley will tour on a 30 minute schedule from these stops:

  • Southbound from Victory Square –
    Cambie St at Hastings St, stop #50410
  • Burrard Station – Burrard St at Melville St, stop #50043
  • Burrard St at Robson St, stop #50045
  • Davie St at Howe St, stop #50011
  • Seymour St at Pender St, stop #61519
  • Waterfront Station – Cordova St at Richards St

A couple of TRAMS BC volunteers will also be on board, so if you have questions about the trolley or just want to chat about transit history, these guys got you covered.

Please note, the trolley is not accessible for passengers with disabilities.

Over the upcoming weeks we will continue to celebrate 125 years of transit, so stay tuned for special interviews, archival photos and more!

Author: Laura Tennant