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Translink Buzzer Blog

Category: Cycling

TransLink to remove abandoned bikes from Bike Parkades

Bicycles which have been left abandoned or discarded in TransLink’s Bike Parkades will be removed and donated to charity over coming weeks. The Bike Parkade cleanout is a first for TransLink and will ensure an efficient use of bike storage space as customers return to using the transit system.

Read more »

Bicycles to be temporarily allowed on SkyTrain during rush hours

 

TransLink customers can now take their bikes on SkyTrain at all times and in all directions on both the Expo and Millennium lines. This change will make it easier for customers to cycle and take transit during the COVID-19 pandemic, while the ridership is still low.

“We’re always looking at ways to improve our customer experience, especially as we navigate these unprecedented times,” says TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond. “This change will give customers more opportunity to integrate cycling into their daily commute with transit and will hopefully encourage more people to leave their cars at home and support more greener modes of transportation this fall.”

Read more »

This is the ultimate guide to a bicycle adventure to Green Timbers in Surrey

Green Timbers Urban Forest

We know parks are a popular place to visit — that’s why we shared five Metro Vancouver Regional Parks to explore this summer by transit. We’re back to share with you how you can take a cycling adventure to Green Timbers Urban Forest in Surrey! Read more »

Go By Bike Week: mapping your route and the “slow” streets movement

Cyclists on Hornby Street in Vancouver

While transit ridership is down in most cities around the globe you might have noticed more people out walking, cycling and breathing in the fresh air!

In the latest in our series to support HUB Cycling’s Go By Bike Week, we take a look some of the changes to streets happening locally and around the world, as well as some trip planning tools and recommended routes to make sure you can get around Metro Vancouver actively and safely.

Is it me or have I been seeing lots of people out walking and cycling?

It’s not just you! While active commuting trips and commuting trips of all types have decreased during the pandemic, recreational cycling trips are up significantly in cities like Vancouver (an 85 per cent increase during March).

Similar increases have been seen across the globe — in Beijing, New York and London — as people look to stay active, commute to work were needed, and take important mental health and physical activity breaks.

Parks in B.C. have witnessed a 62 per cent increase in visitations in May while in the Lower Mainland, Metro Vancouver parks are seeing similar activity with a 67 per cent increase to the end of April 2020.

What’s happening to streets around Metro Vancouver and the globe?

Now you might have been hearing terms like “COVID streets,” “summer streets” or “slow streets.” Local, federal and global physical distancing regulations have sparked conversation around reallocating more road, park and sidewalk space for people to walk, cycle, roll, sit and queue safely. With traffic decreasing during the pandemic, that’s meant cities around the world have moved to turn car lanes into active transportation lanes.

Cities such as Vancouver (50km of slow streets), Oakland, California (119km of slow streets), Portland, Oregon (slow/safe streets at 160 locations), Milan (35km of Strade Aperte [open roads]) and Paris (50km converted bike streets and 30 pedestrianized streets) have reacted rapidly to re-allocate space for cars, to people.

Locally, the City of Vancouver has launched its Room to Move, Room to Queue and Room to Load initiative, installing new routes that prioritize walking, cycling and rolling to make it easier for people to exercise and access businesses in their local neighbourhood.

The city has closed the eastbound lanes on Beach Avenue to all vehicles from Stanley Park to Hornby Street, as well as closing Stanley Park to all vehicles (excluding the Stanley Park Causeway/Highway 99).

To find out more about these developing changes visit the city’s temporary road closures and changes during COVID-19 page, have a read of their FAQs on Slow Streets, or email the city directly: slowstreets@vancouver.ca

What are some things to keep in mind when planning my bike trip?

TransLink recommends using routes with dedicated cycling infrastructure separated from motor vehicles, such as bike lanes, as much as possible. To map out your cycling route, there are a few tools we recommend.

1. Visit TransLink’s Cycling Maps page to view several major TransLink-funded cycleways running parallel to SkyTrain routes.

2. Use Google Maps for trip planning and the estimated time it will take you, but please be mindful, particularly beginner cyclists, that Google Maps does not always recommend the safest cycling routes or take new and existing protected infrastructure into account. If you want to make sure you’re accessing cycling routes for all ages and abilities, please check out these other trip planning platforms:

3. Vancouver Bike Route Planner allows you to filter for “bike routes” and “safer” bike routes as well as a full list of SkyTrain stations, Mobi Bike Share stations and elevation gains.

4. Bikemaps.org is a useful mapping tool that also allows you to filter through new cycling infrastructure, collisions reports, hazards and bike thefts.

5. Bike Citizens Vancouver Did you know that nearly half of all trips under 5 km in Metro Vancouver are made by car? Many of these trips for groceries, prescriptions, and other essentials can easily be done by bicycle. In fact, running errands by bike for trips of this distance is often faster and more convenient than driving. Bicycles are one of the most efficient forms of transport so if you want to SEE how far you can go on a city bike, road bike or mountain bike over 5, 10, 15, and 30-minute increments, check out this handy mapping tool. You might be surprised!

What are other cities in Metro Vancouver doing to open streets?

For a full list of temporary streets changes during COVID please visit your municipality’s website for the most recent updates. In the meantime, here are a few that have been confirmed in the Lower Mainland:

New Westminster

  • McInnes Overpass – Closed the northbound vehicle lane to vehicles, opening it to pedestrians and cyclists.
  • Sixth Avenue – reallocated some curbside parking spaces on Sixth Street (near Sixth Avenue) to a place where pedestrians can wait for the traffic lights to change and pass one another on the sidewalk.
  • Central Valley GW – Closing a southbound curb lane on East Columbia Street / North Rd north of Hume Park to motor vehicles to improve conditions for people walking and cycling along the Central Valley Greenway.

City of North Vancouver

  • Grand Boulevard – Converted road space west between Keith and 19th and Grand Boulevard between 19th and 23rd (these routes are also appropriate for commuting traffic to and from Lynn valley to central Lonsdale).
  • Proposed – All local neighbourhood routes with low traffic volumes (St Andrews, 17th, 4th, 27th and Sutherland)
    • Esplanade, Lonsdale with focus at the intersections of 13th, 15th, 17th streets.
    • Existing bike routes that do not facilitate passing with physical distance without taking the vehicle travel lane: 3rd and 15th streets, 1st/2nd Street west of 3rd, East and West Keith, 13th Street.

Maple Ridge

  • Proposed
    • 123 St Avenue between 203 St to Laity St
    • 227 St between Brown Avenue and Abernethy Way

Port Moody

  • Recommended Routes
    • Neighbourhood bike routes: George Street, Glenayre Drive, Glencoe Drive, Ailsa Drive, College Park Way, Washington, Princeton Ave, Harvard Drive, as well as the Shoreline Trail (some portions are one way only).

Richmond

  • Bayview Street – Established temporary walkway in Steveston Village along the south side of (No. 1 Road-Third Avenue) that provides additional space for safe distancing.
  • Garry Point Park – Implemented one-way walking routes in Garry Point Park in
  • Other recommended routes – Railway Greenway, Railway Ave (Granville Ave-Moncton St), Crabapple Ridge Neighbourhood Bike Route, Granville Ave (Railway Ave-Garden City Road), Parkside Neighbourhood Bike Route, Shell Road Trail (Hwy 99 Overpass-Steveston Hwy)
  • Perimeter Dyke Trails: South Dyke, West Dyke, Middle Arm

Surrey

  • Proposed
    • Surrey reports a 40% decrease in traffic volumes and is exploring 7-8 ‘recreational’ cycling routes around the city to connect to civic facilities, parks and close roads around parks to create loops.

UBC

  • Proposed
    • North West Marine Drive

City of Vancouver

  • Stanley Park – close to cars (some exceptions apply)
  • Beach Avenue – Eastbound lane closed to vehicles on Beach Ave (including Park Lane) from Stanley Park to Hornby St.
  • From May 22, Vancouver is added a further 12km of Slow Streets. Visit the website for more information.

Author: James Ranson

Go by Bike Week: what do you need to know about buying an e-bike

Electric bikes have never been more popular than they are now! Interest is e-bikes is booming and for good reason.

More people of different backgrounds and ages and abilities are finding that e-bikes are helping them stay mobile. Whether that’s seniors or people who find conventional biking difficult or impossible or others who just like the technology and don’t mind a little help getting up that last hill.

E-bikes are fun to ride, help to erase hills in our hilly region and can extend the range that the average rider would have considered. Not to mention they’re good for hauling stuff!

The technology has improved by leaps and bounds, improving the quality of manufacturing and bringing the price of entry level e-bikes down to around $2,000 — about one-quarter the annual cost of owning a car.

The diversity of options has rapidly increased, and you’ll find electric options for nearly every flavour of bike – commuter, beach cruiser, folding and cargo bike.

“Electric bicycle” search popularity on Google Trends

What are the electric bike trends for 2020?

Watch this video find how the technology has evolved and what some of the hottest trends are.

What are some of the things you’ll need to keep in mind when you buy an e-bike?

Motor type: the biggest decision you’ll have to make is whether to purchase an electric bike with a hub motor or a mid-drive (or crank) motor. Hub motors sit in the middle of either your front or rear wheel. Mid-drive motors are housed between your pedals on the frame of your bike. Which is better is subject to an ongoing debate as both motor types have distinct pros and cons. To learn more, check out this video by Blue Monkey Bicycles or these motor guides from Bicycling.com, Canberra Electric Bicycles or Electric Bike Report.

Range: how far your battery will last depends on a number of variables, not the least of which are the specs of your e-bike. If you’re hauling cement blocks on a heavy cargo bike, uphill, against the wind, on gravel, in a rainstorm, your battery isn’t likely to last very long. And are you even pedalling? Many e-bikes come with throttle assist, which means no pedalling, but will drain your battery in a flash. To learn more about what affects e-bike range, check out this article by Really Good Ebikes or try your hand at Bosch’s slick range calculator for its mid-drive motors.

Weight: electric bikes come in a diversity of options, with some just a bit heavier than a conventional bike, with others weighing significantly more. When choosing an e-bike, it’s important to consider weight not only for riding, but also for other transport options. If you’re going to use a TransLink bus bike rack, keep in mind there is a 25 kg (55 lb) weight limit – and the battery should be removed. Other carriers also have weight and battery restrictions, including many common bike racks for automobiles, that you’ll want to keep in mind.

With the higher sticker price of e-bikes (hint, check your HUB member benefits for discounts to save a few bucks), always ensure you have access to secure storage. Buy the best lock you can afford (see lock reviews at bikeradar, GearLab, and Wirecutter), and register your bike for free at 529 Garage. Importantly, insurance options for e-bikes are available.

Just get out and try a ride! While buying an e-bike can seem complicated at first with all the technical options, you’ll get a feel for what works through test rides. Just have a clear understanding of how you’ll use the bike, what trade-off you’re willing to make and you’ll be zipping up hills in no time.

Can I convert my conventional bike to an electric?

Yes you can! Two local, popular vendors for conversion kits include EbikeBC and Grin Technologies. There’s also many more vendors online and an extensive DIY community. Just keep in mind that electric bike parts are often expensive and proprietary. Warranty, service, and repair should be top of mind for any purchase – and that goes for buying a used e-bike.

More resources

Reviews: Electric Bike Review has an in-depth guides and videos. Bicycling.com and BikeRadar also offer reviews on a variety of e-bikes.

Buying guides: REI has all the basics on how to choose an electric bike. And electrek’s guide is worth checking out since it’s aimed at first-time purchasers.

Where can I buy an electric bike in Metro Vancouver? Many of your favourite bike retailers will offer electric options alongside conventional models, but there are a retailers that specialize in electric bicycles:

Go By Bike Week: where to start when buying a bike

Bike sales are booming in Metro Vancouver. It’s no surprise.

“[People] need to get out of the house, they need to do something,” John Fialkowski, manager at Bicycle Sports Pacific, is quoted saying in a CBC article. “All of the gyms are closed, they can’t do their normal workout so people are rediscovering cycling.”

His store is among the Metro Vancouver bike shops experiencing daily lineups outside their doors before they open. Visit HUB Cycling’s website to find a bike shop near you that’s open.

What kind of bike should I buy?

The diversity of different bike options has exploded in different years as interest in the transportation mode has increased.

Whether you’re a first-time rider or an experienced bike user, whether you have short or long commutes, whether you want to cruise the beach, get to work, or haul groceries or your kids – there’s an option for you.

This is the most important question you need to consider. Among the types of bikes are are city, hybrid, road, step-through and folding bikes:

Types of bicycles (Photo: City of Boston)

The answer on what you’ll need will be driven by your travel needs and preferences.

How often and where will you be cycling – hills, paved roads or gravel? Do you value performance or comfort? Do aesthetics matter? Will you be cycling long distances, and/or carrying anything? What kind of weather will you be travelling in? What’s your budget?

The answers to these questions will inform the type of bike that will work best for you.

When it comes to bikes, we often must make trade-offs because there is no such thing as the perfect bike for every occasion.

For example, a bike you’d use to just commute to the office would probably look different from a bicycle you’d only use for long-distance and fast spins to Iona Beach. Although there are multipurpose bikes that are good for everything, but not great at anything.

Some good resources to consult include:

  • Bicycle Planet’s The Five Types of Bikes video
  • City of Boston’s Choose a Bike guide
  • MEC’s How to Buy a Bike page

Some other things to pay attention to:

  • Brakes: light and cheap or high-performance, read about brakes at MEC
  • Budget: while some bikes are quite expensive, for most people a few hundred dollars will be all you need. It’s important to weigh the costs of buying and maintaining a bicycle against car ownership, which averages about $10,000 per year per vehicle.
  • Thinking about buying a strictly commuter bike? See this video by Pure Cycles, which outlines the basics.
  • Thinking about buying a cargo bike? Sales of cargo bikes are increasing as more people and households replace their family cars with these stuff-hauling two-wheelers. Check out Momentum Magazine for cargo bike tips, reviews and buying guides.
  • Thinking about buying an electric bike? Electric Bike Review has great guides and videos. REI has all the basics on how to choose an electric bike.

Buying a bike doesn’t need to be expensive

Consider a used bike: Craigslist or Facebook Marketplace, or places that sell pre-loved bikes like Our Community Bikes. Always ensure the bike you’re considering purchasing isn’t stolen by checking 529 Garage. For more information, Average Joe Cyclist has a complete guide on how to buy a used bike on Craigslist.

How should you check out a used bike prior to purchasing? For inspection tips, watch this Global Cycling Network video, read this article by Total Women’s Cycling, or use this checklist submitted by a Reddit user.

What about accessories?

Buying a bike is more than just picking up a bicycle, you’re also going to need to accessorize with essentials. Check out HUB’s Commuter Bike Shopping List to identify all the accessories you may need.

Perhaps the single most important accessory out there – a good u-lock! Prepare to shell out at least $50 if not $100 (or more) for peace of mind. Confused about which lock to buy? Check out these pages, which have scientifically tested dozens of locks on the market: bikeradarGearLab, and Wirecutter.

Metro Vancouver’s cycling network nearly tripled last decade

HUB Cycling and TransLink have partnered to a release a 2019 State of Cycling report card.

HUB Cycling and TransLink have partnered to release the first ever State of Cycling Report for Metro Vancouver.

The report assesses the region’s quality and quantity of bikeways, the number of residents regularly cycling, and the safety of the cycling network. The rich new data set will help people who cycle better plan their trips by providing an accurate picture of the cycling network.

“HUB Cycling’s goal for the project is to advance the development of a complete regional cycling network that is accessible and comfortable to people of all ages and abilities” said Jeff Leigh, HUB Cycling’s Vice President.  HUB Cycling President Derik Wenman added, “We congratulate TransLink and staff from all the region’s municipal governments for agreeing to work with HUB Cycling on this project. We will all benefit from what we have learned.” Read more »

Electric bikes can now ride the bus too!

Electric bikes are now allowed to ride the bus!

As Metro Vancouver’s transportation authority, we’re more than just transit! Among our responsibilities is providing cycling options in the region and supporting the more than 107,000 bike trips that happen daily.

We know cycling with a little help from an electric boost is becoming more popular. That’s why we’ve updated our rules to allow electric bikes to be placed on our bus bike racks.

There are a few conditions though, the electric bikes must:

  • Weigh less than 25kg (55 lbs.)
  • Wheels fit properly in bike rack
  • Include a lithium battery
  • The customer removes the battery and brings it onboard the bus

There are a few electric bikes that are still not allowed on bike racks such ones that are like a scooter. They weigh too much and don’t fit properly in our bike racks.

Electric bikes are also welcome onboard SeaBus, SkyTrain and the West Coast Express.

If you have any questions, please ask transit staff before boarding or contact Customer Information at 604.953.3333. Visit translink.ca/bikesontransit to learn more about how can you incorporate cycling into your commute.

Happy cycling!

Bike the Night on September 7 — Vancouver’s only on-street and car-free night ride!

The 4th annual Bike the Night is Saturday, September 7. (Photo: HUB Cycling)

We’ve partnered with our friends at HUB Cycling to bring you the biggest party on two wheels… the 4th annual Bike the Night!

On Saturday, September 7, 10 kilometres of streets in downtown Vancouver, including the Burrard Street Bridge, will be opened up exclusively for cyclist participants. Tunes and pop-up dance parties included!

This family-friendly event kicks off at 6 p.m. at Sunset Beach with a festival featuring music, food trucks, free snacks and tune-ups, games and tons of giveaways and prizes. Then families and slow riders hit the road at 7:45 p.m., and all others at 8 p.m. for a ride around False Creek back to Sunset Beach. Read more »

Talk Transport 2050 with us at Car Free Days this weekend, June 15–16

Last year’s Car Free Day on Main Street!

Car Free Day Vancouver is back on June 15, 16 and July 7 and we’ll be there to talk Transport 2050 with you.

Transport 2050 is a new shared regional strategy that will help navigate the next 30 years of transportation in Metro Vancouver!

Read more »

Another improvement on the way for the BC Parkway

An example of a retaining wall along the BC Parkway near Patterson Station.

Over the past few years, we’ve made a number of investments to improve and maintain the BC Parkway, a multi-use path that roughly parallels the the SkyTrain’s Expo Line. It’s an important way for us to reach our long-term cycling goals for the region!

We’re excited to announce that work has begun to replace a retaining wall along the BC Parkway in south Burnaby between London Street and Southpoint Drive. To ensure the safety of all BC Parkway users, a detour route is in place until December 2018 while we complete this work.

Cyclists traveling through the area should add approximately 10 to 15 minutes to their commute. Check out map below for detour information (you can click to enlarge it!). Maps and signs are also installed along the route to help direct pedestrians and cyclists. We thank everyone for their patience while this work is done.

It’s all part of TransLink’s Maintenance and Repair Program, our annual investment in repairing, replacing and improving aging infrastructure across the system to keep customers safe, comfortable and moving across a reliable transit network every day.

The BC Parkway is a 26-kilometre, multi-use path that roughly parallels the SkyTrain’s Expo Line, connecting Surrey’s city centre, New Westminster, south Burnaby, and Vancouver.

4 tips for a successful bike commute

The Canada Line bike bridge

Whether the weather, improving your health and the health and well-being of our communities, cost savings or just looking for a change, bike commuting is a great option for getting around Metro Vancouver. Part of being an organization focused on the effective movement of people and goods across our region means we are dedicated to thinking outside the box when it comes to transportation.

This means transit in our region isn’t just bus, SeaBus, SkyTrain and West Coast Express, but also investing in cycling and cycling infrastructure like bike routes and bike parkades and bus bike racks, integration of apps to assist with multi-modal transportation, and opportunities to leverage car share partnerships to expand commuter’s point A to point B travel options.

Read more »

Celebrate the opening of the Bike Parkade at Metrotown Station

The Bike Parkade at Metrotown Station!

Metrotown Station ranks as the fifth busiest SkyTrain station with close to 20,000 boardings on a typical weekday. That’s dramatically more than when the station opened in 1985, prior to the surrounding area and Metrotown mall developing.

Over the past five years alone, about 3,000 new units have been built near to Metrotown Station, with another 5,000 units under construction or planned – that’s a lot of new folks to the area.

That’s why we’re excited to open a new Bike Parade, completed as part of the recently completed Metrotown Station upgrades, to help make it easier to get around.

We’ll be there on Friday, August 10, between 3:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. with our partners HUB Cycling and Better Environmentally Sound Transportation (BEST) to celebrate! Be one of the first 20 people to ask about how to #BikeToTransit and receive a FREE bike tool kit!

You may be wondering now, what is #BikeToTransit? It’s a partnership between TransLink, HUB Cycling, Mobi by Shaw Go, Better Environmentally Sound Transportation (BEST), Project 529, Modacity and Cowlines that strives to make it easier for commuters to integrate cycling into their travels.

All of you who live, work, or play in the Metrotown area can #BiketoTransit and store your ride in this safe and convenient facility. This is the fifth parkade to open in the region and couldn’t be in a better location, right along BC Parkway. If you haven’t already, enrol for the program today!

Bike Parkades are secure facilities where customers who ride bikes to or from transit can lock their bike for the day. The parkade can be accessed with a registered Compass Card 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for $1 per use (per day) to a maximum of $8 per calendar month.

Aside from the Bike Parkade, the station today has: 

  • Three glass-walled elevators
  • Four pairs of up-and-down escalators
  • New stairs to improve access
  • Two additional entrances, giving customers three ways to access the platform
  • Glass panels and better lighting to improve safety and security
  • Easier connections between bus and SkyTrain
  • A new west stationhouse to integrate with new developments nearby
  • Public art – Steven Brekelmens’ Natural Resources (Log Benches)

SkyTrain Flashback: Metrotown SkyTrain Station circa 1986.

Author: Aylinn Kimura

Setting the stage for a regional Major Bikeway Network

Our TransLink planners tell us that more than ever before people are choosing to commute by cycling, and many are travelling between cities and town centres.

That’s why we’re partnering with local municipalities to invest in the region’s cycling infrastructure to create a Major Bikeway Network (MBN)!

Think of it as the cycling companion the Major Road Network, which are major arterial roads that support the safe and efficient movement of people and goods across the region.

The Major Bikeway Network took a leap forward recently when TransLink worked with regional partners, including municipal staff, to develop and approve an updated, interim Major Bikeway Network. This will help guide regional cost-share investments in cycling in 2019 and 2020, unlocked as part of the 10-Year Vision.

Interim Major Bikeway Network map

Interim Major Bikeway Network Map (subject to change)

Through our municipal cost-sharing programs, TransLink contributes up to 50 per cent of eligible capital costs to upgrade roads on the Major Road Network, as well as bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure in Metro Vancouver.

There are currently more than 3,000 kilometres of bike paths and more than 900 kilometres of protected or separated bikeways in the region.

The 10-Year Vision identifies creating a Major Bikeway Network as a regional priority, connecting to and within designated regional centres, and calls for TransLink to cost-share with local governments to support its creation.

The original Major Bikeway Network concept was developed several years ago as part of the 2011 Regional Cycling Strategy. Recognizing this, TransLink worked with local government staff, Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure staff, and HUB representatives over the past several months to produce an updated MBN.

This updated Major Bikeway Network was approved by TransLink’s Regional Transportation Advisory Committee, a group comprised of transportation directors and managers representing the 23 local governments in the Metro Vancouver region.

In additional to cycling, the 10-Year Vision also identifies the need for investments to improve walking access to transit.

Through TransLink’s Walking Infrastructure to Transit (WITT) cost-share funding program, we’ll be helping municipalities do that! The Phase One and Two investment plans provides $2.5 million in 2017 and $5 million annually through 2021.

More information about specific road, cycling and walking projects which TransLink contributed funding to between 2012 and 2017 can be viewed online here.

#BiketoTransit and park it with us! The Bike Parkade at King Edward Station is now open

Photo of Bike Parkade at King Edward Station

The Bike Parkade at King Edward Station is now open!

May 2018 was a record month for TransLink’s Bike Parkades, recording nearly 2,600 entries across the system! There were nearly 700 entries into the bike parkade during Bike to Work Week alone. Needless to say, cycling is becoming an increasingly popular option for commuters.

That’s why we’re excited to open a new Bike Parkade at King Edward Station so more people can #BiketoTransit! This is the first parkade to open on the Canada Line and fourth across the system.

Bike Parkades are secure facilities where customers who ride bikes to or from transit can lock their bike for the day. The parkade can be accessed with a registered Compass Card 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for $1 per use (per day) to a maximum of $8 per calendar month.


Each day, 107,000 trips are made each day by cycling in Metro Vancouver and it’s our job to help support and grow the number of bike trips!

#BiketoTransit is a partnership between TransLink, HUB Cycling, Mobi by Shaw Go, Better Environmentally Sound Transportation (BEST), Project 529, Modacity and Cowlines that strives to make it easier for commuters to integrate cycling into their travels.

Contest Alert! ⚠️ Our friends at HUB Cycling and Mobi by Shaw Go are celebrating multimodal transportation through a #BiketoTransit photo contest! Submit a photo of you combining cycling and transit to enter to win a prize pack that includes a one-zone Monthly Pass from TransLink and a Mobi by Shaw Go 365-Day Plus Pass.

Aside from Bike Parkades, our fleet is fully accessible to bikes. Never taken a bike onto the bus before? You can practice at Main Street–Science World Station and at the City of North Vancouver’s City Hall Plaza. Visit translink.ca/bikesontransit to learn more!

We’ve also partnered with Hub Cycling and Mobi by Shaw Go. Mobi’s offering a free Day Pass so you can cycle for part of your commute. Use the promo code biketotransit to redeem a free 24-hour pass at and get cycling.

Later this year, two more Bike Parkades will open at Metrotown and Commercial–Broadway stations, with seven additional parkades planned for installation over the next few years!

Future Bike Parkade Projects

A map of current and future Bike Parkades! Click to enlarge.