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Posts tagged: #whatsthelink

#WhatsTheLink: TransLink is the link

#WhatsTheLink Week 8

Now you know #WhatsTheLink! ;)

Through out the course of our #WhatsTheLink series on The Buzzer and our partners Miss 604, Vancity Buzz, and Vancouver Observer, we have been telling you all about what TransLink is responsible for in the region.

Now as our series draws to a close, we are here to answer the question: What’s the link? We are the link.

How do we deliver the link? Through the Major Road Network, five bridges, transit, cycling, a connected and hard working transportation system, community shaping, and goods movement of course!

Major Road Network

Our Major Road Network is 2,300 lane kilometres of roads in Metro Vancouver that help facilitate the safe and efficient movement of people and goods across the region.

Line ’em up and that’s long enough to stretch from here to San Diego, California!

In 2014, over $45 million has been committed for the operation, maintenance, and rehabilitation of the network.

Five bridges

There are 200,000 crossings each day over the Fraser River that happen on one of TransLink’s five bridges! No typo!

They are the Knight Street, Golden Ears, Pattullo, Westham Island, and the Canada Line Pedestrian-Bicycle bridges.

Transit

You’ve heard the numbers — over 360 million system boardings and over 235 million passenger trips annually — but how many people actually take transit in Metro Vancouver each day?

418,000 is the number of people that take TransLink transit each day – that’s more than the population of Burnaby and Richmond combined!

Cycling

Part of TransLink’s multimodal mandate is to help support the people making the 107,000 bike trips each day in Metro Vancouver.

We contribute  up to  50  per  cent  of  capital  costs for regional  cycling  upgrades, including the Central Valley Greenway and BC Parkway.

Our transit vehicles are all equip to handle bicycles and we recently opened the first Secure Bike Parking facility at the newly renovated east stationhouse at Main Street-Science World Station.

A connected and hard working transportation system

Being a multimodal organization, TransLink is able to seamlessly connect all modes of transportation and deliver our customers a hard working, reliable transit system that gets you and where your goods need to go.

In 2013, the SkyTrain was on-time 95 per cent of the time for both the Expo and Millennium lines, West Coast Express was on time 98 per cent of the time, and 99.4 per cent of scheduled service for bus and SkyTrain was delivered.

Community shaping

Transit has guided growth and community design in the region from the very beginning! TransLink has helped shape sustainable communities by integrating with community planning throughout the region.

With future Transit Oriented Developments in the works, TransLink is actively involved in carry on this legacy. By 2018, we anticipate there to be over 70 integrated, transit-oriented developments around SkyTrain stations!

Goods movement

Our transit, roads, bridges, cycling and walking infrastructure all work in tandem to help with goods movement and Metro Vancouver’s economy.

TransLink manages major roads and helps to ease traffic congestion by moving trips away from the road to SkyTrain, West Coast Express, SeaBus or bus.

This way you can get the coffee, medical supplies and almost anything you can buy at a local store, hospital, school and more.

_

TransLink is the link to shaping communities, moving goods, and a connected transportation system – from the Major Road Network and five bridges to transit service and cycling infrastructure!

For more on #WhatsTheLink and for a chance to win a three-zone FareCard, read our partner posts on Miss 604 and Vancity Buzz.

Author: Allen Tung

#WhatsTheLink: TransLink helps with goods movement and the economy

"The Goods"

“The Goods”

For this latest week in the #WhatsTheLink series, we’re looking at goods movement in the region.

TransLink helps 418,000 people get where they need to go and 107,000 cycling trips in Metro Vancouver possible each day.

How do we do this?

We provide a hard working and reliable transit system2,300 lane kilometres of major roads, five bridges, as well as cycling and walking infrastructure that has shaped communities!

#WhatsTheLink between everything? A part in Metro Vancouver’s economy – ensuring goods and people get where they need to go!

Miss 604: TransLink Helps to Make our Regional Economy a Thriving One

Have you ever wondered about the journey the coffee you drink took? If you’re like many in Metro Vancouver, you probably haven’t.

That’s because the goods we use each day are usually readily available on the shelves, and we take it for granted. One of the reasons we don’t have to worry about finding fresh milk, fuel for our vehicles or materials to build our homes is because of the efficient movement of goods and people in our region.

Sany Zein

Sany Zein

Although Metro Vancouver’s ports have been identified as a gateway to Asia, Sany Zein, Director of Infrastructure and Network Management for TransLink explains many of the trucks we see on the roads are serving the local economy.

“While gateway-oriented goods movement is a very large part of our economy, most of the trucks we see on the roads are serving the local economy,” says Zein.

“Almost everything we have in our homes and businesses is delivered by truck. Without an efficient Major Roads Network, we wouldn’t have a thriving economy.”

These trucks not only rely on the Major Roads Network, but an efficient transit system as well.

Wait…what?!? Trucks depend on an efficient transit system? Yup!

Vancity Buzz: 3 Ways TransLink Helps Free Congestion in Metro Vancouver

"Count on it!"

“Count on it!”

Besides being an important mode of transportation for people in the region, transit helps free up congestion on the roads.

By moving trips away from the road to SkyTrain, West Coast Express, SeaBus or bus, TransLink helps the region avoids huge traffic congestion problems.

Did you know? Six out of 10 people in Metro Vancouver take public transit to work or school!

When truckers aren’t using the Provincial roads network, they look to the Major Road Network to get them where they need to go. It is the backbone for the movement of goods in the region.

This year, TransLink is providing $42 million dollars towards the Major Road Network.

Infrastructure projects funded by TransLink such as the Golden Ears Bridge and Roberts Bank Rail Corridor are important too! They help alleviate congestion and bottlenecks on the roads network.

Providing an efficient public transportation system, managing the Major Roads Network and funding major infrastructure projects are three ways TransLink helps get you and goods we all need moving around the region.

Author: Allen Tung

#WhatsTheLink: Transit has shaped Metro Vancouver

Our hard working transit system gets the region’s 418,000 riders each day where they need to go. Aside from transit, TransLink also manages 2,300 lane kilometres of major roads, five bridges, and helps make 107,000 cycling trips in the region each day possible.

And we are back this week to share with you another #WhatsTheLink tidbit!

There’s a good chance where you spend your days is directly related to where transit and these infrastructures are located in Metro Vancouver. Transit has guided growth and community design in the region from the very beginning!

Miss 604: #WhatsTheLink: Transit Shapes Your Region and Helps to Make it More Livable

1960s Vancouver freeway proposal

Photo: City of Vancouver Archives

From the arrival of the railroad in the late 1800s, to the early street cars of the 1900s, and then the interurban lines that later connected New Westminster, Vancouver, Steveston, Karrisdale and Chilliwack, transit has helped fuel the growth of communities.

The region’s growth strategy was updated in the 1970s and it brought a prohibition on the expansion of highways into the city of Vancouver. Transit was seen as way to facilitate the growth of the region.

This set the stage for the birth of the SkyTrain system in the 1980s. The SkyTrain system today includes the Expo, Millennium and Canada Line, connecting Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond and Surrey. The planned the Evergreen Line expands the SkyTrain system into Port Moody and Coquitlam.

Vancity Buzz: #WhatsTheLink: How Transit Has Shaped Metro Vancouver

The SkyTrain system, from the outset, has been shaping Metro Vancouver development and is helping to determine where we build in Metro Vancouver.

Statements like, “Anything transit-oriented—anything close to a station—is going to be a highly coveted opportunity” and “…The consumer has spoken. They want to live on transit, and they’ll buy without parking” are showing developers as well as buyers and renters see proximity to transit as valuable.

These transit-oriented communities—or transit-oriented developments (TODs)—focus on making transit accessible to everyone.

They promote more walking and cycling than communities without good access to transit, resulting in lower levels of automobile use and greenhouse gas emissions.

By 2018, we anticipate there to be over 70 integrated, transit-oriented developments around SkyTrain stations!

Among them, new communities are sprouting up around Brentwood Town Centre, Oakridge-41st Avenue and Marine Drive Stations.

Author: Allen Tung

#WhatsTheLink: TransLink transit is working hard in Metro Vancouver

The 99 B-Line, SeaBus, and SkyTrain — our transit superheroes!

The 99 B-Line, SeaBus, and SkyTrain — our transit superheroes!

We’ve let you know TransLink is responsible for much more than just transit — our mandate includes roads, bridges, cycling and walking paths.

But for #WhatsTheLink this week, we’re going to what we’re famous for — transit! We shared with you a number of Metro Vancouver transit photos from yesteryear and introduced you to our transit superheroes, the 99 B-Line, SeaBus, and SkyTrain.

How are they transit superheroes? The 99 B-Line is one of the busiest bus routes in North America, with nearly 17 million boardings in 2012. The SeaBus moves six million people each year across the Burrard Inlet between Downtown Vancouver and Lonsdale Quay in North Vancouver. And SkyTrain? It’s on-time 95 per cent of the time!

Miss 604: What a Grade 6 Student Knows About TransLink

Boya Yang

Boya Yang

Boya Yang is a grade six student at Marlborough Elementary in Burnaby and he knows TransLink’s transit system is hard working, helping to keep Metro Vancouver moving and livable.

He used TransLink as the subject of his project, which won him the Rotary Club of Burnaby Ambassador Award at the Rivers to Sea Regional Heritage Fair a couple of weeks back.

» Click here to see a picture of Boya’s project

Boya’s knowledge about TransLink is quite impressive! In his project, he highlights TransLink’s history and its importance as well as the different transit services TransLink offers including buses, SeaBus, SkyTrain, and West Coast Express.

As he points out in his project, TransLink helps connect people and make the region a better place to live.

To do this, TransLink connects the 418,000 people who take transit each day with a reliable system that is multimodal and seamlessly connected.

Vancity Buzz: Your hard working transportation system

Angus McIntyre

Angus McIntyre

How reliable? Well, here are a few facts from 2013:

  • The SkyTrain is on time 95% of the time for both the Expo and Millennium lines.
  • The West Coast Express is on time 98% of the time.
  • TransLink delivered 99.4% of scheduled service for bus and SkyTrain last year.

Angus McIntyre retired in 2011 after over 40 years as a bus operator in Metro Vancouver.

During his years as a bus operator, Angus has seen a lot of changes to the system. These changes include the buses he operated and people he served.

As you can see from the photo below, he was a bit of a shutterbug and things looked a little different in the 70s and 80s.

Buses at Stanley Park

Buses at Stanley Park

Storify: TransLink transit is working hard in Metro Vancouver

Check out our Storify summary!

Check out our Storify summary!

What hasn’t changed since Angus’ time is a commitment by TransLink to move people and goods across the region.

TransLink has been providing transportation options to people in Metro Vancouver since 1999. For 15 years we’ve been part of your communities, getting you where you need to be.

Check out our Storify to see more of Angus’s photos and others, as well as on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! We’ve also launched a #WhatsTheLink microsite at http://www.translink.ca/wtl.

Author: Allen Tung

#WhatsTheLink: 418,000 people take TransLink transit each day

What's 418,000?

What’s 418,000?

We’ve let you know TransLink is responsible for more than just transit — we are also responsible for roads, bridges, cycling and walking paths.

TransLink manages 2,300 lane kilometres of roads through the Major Road Network (MRN) and five bridges — the Knight StreetPattulloGolden Ears, and Westham Island bridges as well as the Canada Line bike and pedestrian bridge.

There are 200,000 crossings each day on TransLink bridges and roughly 100,000 crossings a year happen by bike on the Canada Line bike and pedestrian bridge.

And we’re back to share another fact with you for #WhatsTheLink!

Have you ever wondered how many people take TransLink transit each day? 418,000 people do!

That’s more than 10 Vancouver Sun Runs, more than the population of Richmond and Burnaby combined, and enough to fill BC Place Stadium seven times!

We decided to talk to nine of our 418,000 riders to learn more about their transit story and to get a few snapshots of riders in the region.

Miss 604: Three Out of 418,000 Riders – Surrey Central Station

Alisha

Alisha

Albe

Albe

Nick

Nick

Surrey Central Station is a major transit hub in our system — connecting commuters to SkyTrain and by bus to White Rock, North Delta, Ladner, Tsawwassen, and Langley.

There we met riders NickAlbe, and Alisha.

Nick was travelling by transit from Coquitlam to Surrey Central. He says, “It’s pretty good. It gets me to where I want to go. The bus isn’t a car, but it’s a tradeoff. I don’t have to pay for insurance or the car itself.”

Albe says she doesn’t use transit too often, but she takes the bus and SkyTrain to go downtown on the weekends, four-to-five times a month. “It’s easier to use public transit because it’s hard to find parking downtown,” she explains.

Alisha is heavy transit user. She says, “I take transit more than once every day. I take my step-daughter to school. I take it to the mall. I go everywhere on the bus.”

Vancity Buzz: Three Out of 418,000 Riders – Production Way-University Station

Sergei

Sergei

Emily

Emily

Esther

Esther

EstherEmily, and Sergei shared their transit story with us at Production Way – University Station. 

This station is a major transfer point between SkyTrain and Simon Fraser University‘s Burnaby campus.

Each day, 13,300 rides are made from the station on bus route 145 to SFU. In all, the 145 takes half of all the daily trips to and from the University.

Esther lives in Surrey and parked her car at our Scott Road Park and Ride facility to catch the SkyTrain and 145 to get to SFU. “I’m okay with a long commute because I like to read and listen to podcasts. I don’t have to focus on the road. That’s why I like it,” she says.

Emily is also a student at SFU and she says she takes transit at least five days a week when school is in session. She also drives, but tries using transit whenever possible.

Sergei isn’t a student at SFU, but he relies on the 145 to get to work as a computer programmer at the bottom of Burnaby Mountain. He says, “I take transit five days a week as well as on the weekends to most places I want to go.”

Vancouver Observer: Three Out of 418,000 Riders – Braid Station 

#WhatsTheLink Jason

Jason

Ecil

Ecil

Amand

Amand

Imagine taking transit from Victoria, B.C. to your place of work in Metro Vancouver.

That’s exactly what Amand does! We met him along with Ecil and Jason at Braid Station.

The station is a transfer point from SkyTrain to Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Maple Ridge, and Langley. Presently, the station is also the terminus for the 555 Port Mann Express from Carvolth Exchange in Langley.

Amand comes into town on Tuesday mornings and returns home on Saturdays. It takes three buses and two SkyTrain trips, between one-and-a-half to two hours, to take Amand from Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal to his place of work.

Ecil takes both the bus and SkyTrain roughly three to four times to get to work in the health care industry. On the day we spoke with her, she was on her way to catch the SkyTrain with her two-year-old son to walk around Downtown Vancouver and enjoy the day.

Jason is also in the health care industry, working as a nurse. He says he takes either the 155 or 156 from the Brunette Avenue area to Braid to catch the 555 to Langley roughly four times a week.

Storify: #WhatsTheLink: 418,000 TransLink riders strong!

Check out our Storify summary!

Check out our Storify summary!

In sum, we talked to 19 different riders of our 418,000 strong to to learn more about their transit story and to get snapshots of riders in the region.

Everybody’s transit story was a little different, but all of them revolved around common themes.

Many of them depend on transit to get to school and work and we had both “transit lifers” as well as transit newbies.

We’re proud to have all 418,000 as one of our 418,000 riders strong!

Author: Allen Tung

#WhatsTheLink: There are 200,000 crossings each day on TransLink bridges

The Canada Line bike bridge is one as well!

Riders using the Canada Line bike and pedestrian bridge

What is TransLink? Not only are we responsible for transit, but we are also responsible for roads, bridges, cycling and walking paths.

We told you last week that TransLink manages the Major Road Network (MRN) and 2,300 lane kilometres of roads.

This week, we’re here to share another fact with you!

TransLink owns and maintains five bridges: Knight StreetPattulloGolden Ears, and Westham Island bridges as well as the Canada Line bike and pedestrian bridge.

Did you know that there are 200,000 crossings by trucks, cars, and buses over these bridges each day? In addition to these motor vehicles over the Fraser River, roughly 100,000 crossings a year happen by bike on the Canada Line bike and pedestrian bridge.

Miss 604: The Canada Line Pedestrian-Bicycle Bridge

Heiror

Heiror

Karen

Karen

Josef

Josef

Robert Willis, editor of the Buzzer, had used all but the Canada Line Pedestrian-Bicycle Bridge before, so he decided pay it a visit to learn more about it.

There he met three cycling commuters. 

Josef has been riding across the bridge nearly every day since it opened to get to work.

Karen just started taking the bridge more frequently after starting a new job in Richmond. A fair-weather cyclist, she drives over the Oak Street Bridge when the rain pours but prefers cycling to driving,

Heiror was leisurely riding and taking photos along the bridge while he was making his way to his first day interning at a Vancouver studio.

Vancouver Observer: Westham Island Bridge, star of the big and small screen

Westham Island Bridge

Westham Island Bridge

One of TransLink’s bridges is pretty famous — Hollywood famous.

Westham Island Bridge has been featured on a number of television shows and movies.

One episode of the A&E series Bates Motel involved an actress standing on the edge of the bridge (wearing a safety harness of course) and jumping from the bridge into the water. The short-lived TV series John Doe, a Jello ad and a collection of car commercials also feature the rustic bridge in recent years.

The film Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief used the bridge as well. The cult TV series X-Files used the bridge in a least two episodes. We’ve been told the bridge offers a pleasant, old and simple look that’s sought after.

When it’s not starring on the big screen, it’s a vital link connecting Westham Island with Ladner and the Municipality of Delta. It is one of the few remaining bridges containing wood components in Metro Vancouver—the bridge is comprised of thirty timber spans.

Vancity Buzz: The Knight Street Bridge, 40 Years of Transportation and Community

Marjorie

Marjorie

Katie

Katie

David

David

The Knight Street Bridge opened in 1974 to replace the Fraser Street Bridge, which had become obsolete.

In forty years, the bridge has become a heavily used route for both commuters and businesses. It provides a vital link between Richmond and Vancouver.

David is the President of Harbour Link Container Services INC. He says Knight Street, including the Knight Street Bridge, is an important part of his business. He says, “It’s the main artery from the Downtown Vancouver terminals to industry in Richmond North and South as well as the Tilbury Industrial area out to Delta Port.”

Katie works at Our Town Café says the Knight Street Bridge connects them to Richmond and Vancouver International Airport.

Marjorie says the Knight Street Bridge is a regular fixture in her life. She says she uses the Knight Street Bridge to and from Richmond to buy vegetables like onions, green chilies and tomatoes for the restaurant.

Storify: #WhatsTheLink: Bridges

Check out our Storify summary!

Check out our Storify summary!

In addition to the stories, we ran a matching game on our Instagram page asking if you knew “what the link” was between two different sights.

Pictures we uploaded include the River Rock Casino in Richmond, the Langara Golf Course in Vancouver, and the International Summer Night Market in Richmond.

Check out our Storify to see all the images and answers from the game!

Author: Allen Tung

#WhatsTheLink: What is TransLink?

We have a new video for #WhatsTheLink!

“Probably SkyTrain.”

“Bus.”

“SkyTrain.”

“Oh, SkyTrain.”

Those are all correct, but TransLink’s mandate as Metro Vancouver’s transportation authority covers much more. In addition to public transit, we are also responsible for maintaining the Major Road Network including five bridges, developing the Regional Cycling Strategy and more!

Over the next couple of months, we’ll be rolling out one fact a week and sharing it with all of you here as part of #WhatsTheLink. We will also share this weekly fact on our Instagram, Twitter and Facebook channels as well as other blogs.

In our first week, we shared the fact TransLink manages 2,300 lane kilometres of road and profiled the Kingsway corridor on Miss 604, Vancity Buzz, and the Vancouver Observer.

Check back soon as we reveal more facts about #WhatsTheLink!

Author: Allen Tung

#WhatsTheLink: TransLink manages 2,300 lane kilometres of road

That's a lot of road!

That’s a lot of road!

Our first fact about all that TransLink does has been making the rounds on the web this past week. The graphic above shows just how many lane kilometres TransLink is responsible. Unfortunately, we can’t reorganize these roads in the Major Road Network. They’re busy moving people and goods around the region!

You might be thinking that you’ve seen the above graphic before. Well, you’re partly right. We posted a similar image in February. The number of kilometres has been updated for this latest image. Not all the roads we manage are part of the MRN. Therefore, we’ll just have to dream of sunny spots of California rather than Mexico ;).

This first fact has been shared with local blogs along with some stories about the MRN and Kingsway written by yours truly. In case you haven’t come across them yet, here’s a snippet from each. I encourage you to read them in their entirety. Let us know what you think.

Miss 604: Macrons and Kingsway are part of your Major Road Network

Kingsway is a road unlike any other in Metro Vancouver. At first a walking trail for local First Nations, it then became a wagon road in the mid-19th century….Kingsway is also part of TransLink’s Major Road Network (MRN). The MRN is a network of major arterial roads that stretches across the region and connects people and transports goods across municipal boundaries.

Catherine Introligator of French Made Backing

Catherine Introligator of French Made Baking

Walking the north end of Kingsway you find yourself surround by all types of business and people. Coffee drinkers imbibe at coffee shops next to hair salons, eateries and various shops.

One place I stopped in was the unassuming bakery at 81 Kingsway. It was the pastel colours of macarons that caught my eye and the smell of butter that lured me through the doors of French Made Baking. Once inside, I was met by almond croissants hot from the oven and Parisian-accented English.

VancityBuzz: From trail to street, Kingsway is part of our history and the Major Road Network

Have you ever wondered why Kingsway is unlike other roads in Metro Vancouver? Why, unlike most streets in Vancouver and Burnaby, does Kingsway cut across the grid in a seemingly brazen diagonal from the northwest to the southeast?

The answer is that Kingsway is older than most roads in the region. It came into being before our cities were well established and before planners had the bright idea to make a system of roads following a grid design….

Artwork by Sonny Assue, image by Lila Bujold.

Artwork by Sonny Assue, image by Lila Bujold.

In 2012, the City of Vancouver commissioned artist Sonny Assu to design a street marker as part of Vancouver’s 125th Anniversary. What Sonny created speaks to both the collective history of the street as well as the personal history of the artist. I had the opportunity to ask Sonny as few question about his work and the street that inspired it.

What does Kingsway mean to you?

Nostalgia. With certain stretches that seem lost in time, the element of nostalgia that is inherent within Kingsway is probably the most compelling element of the road itself.

Vancouver Observer: Your Major Road Network Leads to Kingsway

If you’ve ever walked along Kingsway, you might think, like I have, of its history…

The community at Kingsway and Main is diverse. People from around the world and close to home have made this triangle of major roads their place of business. That includes Jae, owner and manager of Gene Café

“It’s low key, there’s a good community here and there are regular customers. What Gene is today has naturally built up over the years. I really like that about this part of Kingsway. I’ve only been in Vancouver for a short time, but while I’ve been at Gene, I’ve noticed changes in the area. There are more buildings, and we’re a little busier now than we were a year ago.”

Kingsway and Main 1908 and 2014. Kingsway and Main, 1908. Philip Timms. VPL# 6780 (left), Kingsway and Main, 2014 Robert Willis

Kingsway and Main 1908 and 2014. Kingsway and Main, 1908. Philip Timms. VPL# 6780 (left), Kingsway and Main, 2014 Robert Willis

Storify: #WhatsTheLink: Major Road Network (MRN)

We also had a guessing game on our Instagram page asking you to identify different roads that are part of the Major Road Network. Check out our Storify summary to see the different photographs we uploaded!

#WhatsTheLink

#whatsthelinkIt’s pressure free test time. What is TransLink responsible for?

A)   Public Transit

B)   The Major Roads Network

C)   Five Bridges

D)   The Regional Cycling Strategy

E)   All of the above and more

If you answered ‘E’ you get a gold star!

 

We’re not just transit

Transit is what we are often known for in the region, but TransLink’s mandate covers much more. Today we’re starting a new series called #whatsthelink. It’s all about what TransLink is responsible for in Metro Vancouver and some little known facts about what we do.

Over the next couple of months, we’ll be rolling out one fact a week and sharing it with all of you here. We will also share this weekly fact on our Instagram, Twitter and Facebook channels as well as other blogs. These facts will be accompanied by graphics, photos and maybe even the chance to win some prizes!

Whether you get around by the road, bridge, train, bus, boat and/or bike, the work we do at TransLink has an effect on almost everyone in Metro Vancouver. We want to spread the word about all that TransLink does. We also want to share some of the amazing facts about our transportation system with you.

So join us, learn a little, and share your images and thoughts on the work we do along the way! Want to learn more beyond this series? Check out the TransLink website or our previous Buzzer series, TransLink 101.