Translink Buzzer Blog

Police dogs, text-message crime reporting: SkyTrain ramps up security measures based on new research

Doug Kelsey and Ward Clapham at the press conference, held at Broadway Station today.

Doug Kelsey and Ward Clapham at the press conference, held at Broadway Station today.

We held a press conference at Broadway Station today about new security measures SkyTrain is putting in place (or already has put in place!) on the system.

Doug Kelsey, president and CEO of SkyTrain, and Ward Clapham, Chief Officer of our Transit Police, talked about these changes at the conference, and explained that they are happening due to the results of major research and public consultation initiatives on the topic of SkyTrain security.

Here’s the items we released to the press, for your reading pleasure:

I’ll also talk a little more about the major items from the announcement below.

What are the new security measures coming to SkyTrain?

  • Security personnel will be more visible at stations where transit customers feel the least secure
    This is a measure that’s already in place: SkyTrain Attendants and/or Transit Police officers will be present full-time at the Surrey Central, New Westminster, Broadway and Main Street locations, since consultations show that customers feel the least secure at these stations. SkyTrain staff will keep a safety watch at the stations while new Transit Police bike patrols will join local police forces in covering neighbourhoods around the stations, which were also identified as ‘unsafe’ in the public surveys.
  • New Transit Police bike patrols
    Eleven Transit Police officers have been issued bikes and 10 more will get their bikes next year. Chief Officer Clapham explains that two officers on bikes have the same effect as eight officers on foot because they can cover far more ground.
  • SkyWatch: customers report crime via text-messages
    We’ll be setting up a special number where customers can text any suspicious or criminal activity directly to security personnel.
  • Continued drug sweeps in partnership with police forces along the SkyTrain line
    After focusing on drug sweeps along the line, Transit Police have seen arrests increase 83 per cent compared to last year.
  • The creation of “transit villages” around Surrey Central and Broadway Station
    Transit villages are attractive, compact, mixed-use communities centered around a transit station, allowing residents, workers, and shoppers to drive less and take transit, walk and cycle more. The villages feature improved lighting, sight lines and amenities that promote safe walking and cycling. These will definitely take some time as we work with the different municipalities to improve streets in neighbourhoods around SkyTrain stations.
  • Broadway Station safety and security upgrades
    We’re continuing with Broadway Station upgrades that include significant safety and security initiatives. Check out this post for more information on the upgrades.
  • Continuing to expand retail presence at SkyTrain stations to provide more “eyes and ears” at more times of the day
  • Testing public acceptance of the use of police dogs on the SkyTrain system
    This one’s gotten a lot of attention, but it’s still in the early stages of development! Don’t expect to see Turner and Hooch swarming the trains tomorrow.

    Edit: In response to the comments on this post, I asked Tom Seaman from Transit Police media relations for a bit more info on the police dog use. The full comment is available below, but I thought I’d highlight two key paragraphs here too.

    Having “police dogs” on the Transit System is a big… “IF” right now. As a police service we have to look at all ways of maintaining the safety and security of the system. “IF” we learn through research that dogs can enhance this goal then we “MAY” implement such a plan. Our work is not impeded by not having dogs, but we may be able to do more with one or two specifically trained dogs. We would not be roaming the system sniffing people for drugs. We “MAY” want to sniff for explosives though. Again, thinking of safety and security, what would the public response be if some sort of attack took place against the system, and we had not done all we could to prevent or detect that attack.

    Many transit systems around the world use much more stringent security measures, including dogs. Luckily we have not got to that point yet. But, you just have look around the world to see what is taking place and what has been targeted to see what could happen. We already see the dogs in use right here at the airport. I have not heard any protest to that. We move close to 72 million people a year, we owe it to them to do the utmost to protect them.

  • Completion of lighting upgrades at the Expo Line stations
  • Testing facility improvements that will make emergency telephones and other security systems easier to locate, particularly on station platforms

These new security measures sound a bit disparate. Are there any themes linking them all together as a unified program?

Doug Kelsey

Doug Kelsey

A perceptive question. Essentially, our research and analysis identified four key ‘themes’ that shape these measures and future measures we will undertake to improve security for customers:

  • REASSURANCE – making sure SkyTrain Attendants and police officers are more visible in stations, particularly at stations identified by the public as the “least safe”
  • ENGAGEMENT – more contact with members of the public as new ways in which they can participate in improving security conditions on the system
  • INFRASTRUCTURE – measures such as upgraded lighting and video monitoring and renovations such as the work currently underway at Broadway station
  • INTERVENTION – taking public security beyond the realm of law enforcement and attacking the root causes of crime through an integrated approach with health, social and mental health services

Okay. So, you’ve said these measures come as a result of extensive public consultation and research. Just what consultations and research did you do over the last year?

A lot, actually. The consultation efforts included:

Plus, the Transit Police did their own analysis of criminal activity in the areas surrounding SkyTrain stations, using existing statistics on crime in Metro Vancouver supplied by local police departments.

That resulted in two reports: the LMD SkyTrain Analysis Pilot Project and the Lower Mainland SkyTrain Analysis Report. The Pilot Project took data from a 28-day period in the summer of 2007, plotted the location of each incident within 250m (approximately three blocks) of a SkyTrain station and compared those patterns with crime patterns in the rest of the cities in question. The Analysis Report looked specifically at incidents within 100m of each station over a one year period. There was no attempt to confirm or refute a causal relationship between SkyTrain and crime, but rather to describe the distribution of crime in the areas surrounding the stations.

This is the first time crime levels at or near SkyTrain stations have been compared with crime patterns in the rest of the cities in which they were located. You can read a summary of those two reports in this analysis document (this is the analysis document released to the press from the beginning of this post).

And all together, this is the most extensive review of security measures we have ever done on the system.

I’d love to read all that, but I don’t really have time. Can you tell me the key points and ideas that bubbled up from the consultations and research?

Doug Kelsey and Ward Clapham

Doug Kelsey and Ward Clapham

Well, we learned a lot. Here’s some of the highlights:

  • 11 per cent of crimes occur within 250m of a SkyTrain station
  • SkyTrain stations with the higher crime rates are located in areas where certain “attractants” exist, such as the consistent presence of drug dealers, in some cases certain types of pubs and nightclubs or agencies, facilities and services serving drug dependent people or those with mental challenges
  • SkyTrain stations near shopping centres also showed higher rates of crime within 250m
  • In addition to mapping crime incidents near existing SkyTrain stations, the LMD SkyTrain Analysis Pilot Project also reviewed crime data along the Canada Line corridor in Richmond, and found that six per cent of the city’s incidents occur within 250m of the future stations. The Transit Police is using this data to better manage or even mitigate the security situation around the new stations.
  • Perceptions of insecurity at SkyTrain stations are not necessarily driven by the levels of crime around the stations.

    For example, people indicate they feel safer at downtown Vancouver stations because there are more people around, yet the combined number of incidents around those four stations is higher than in Surrey, where people say they feel least safe.

    As Doug Kelsey said in our press release, “Waterfront is perceived as the ‘safest’ station on the line, yet it has the highest rate of crime going on around it in terms of incidents per 100,000 people passing through the station. Other stations have much lower crime rates and yet the anxiety level is high, due to the presence of what transit customers call ‘unsavoury people’ in or around stations. There are things we can and will do about that.”

    As well, Metrotown station was listed in the top five safest and least safe stations (its incident rate is 20th on the list: 19.25). Main Street-Science World tied with Broadway as third-least-safe station, yet the Transit Police report finds Main Street had the 11th lowest rate per 100,000 boardings of the 33 stations on the system.

  • Consistently, the biggest factor driving feelings of insecurity was the presence of ‘unsavoury’ people on the system or around the stations.

    A variety of indicators pointed to ‘unsavoury’ people—defined as loiterers, panhandlers, drug users, and others—as the chief factor influencing feelings of insecurity.

    For us, the presence of people with any variety of medical, psychological or social disadvantages near transit facilities or elsewhere in the community signals the need for a broad response based on compassion for their situation as well as care for the security and wellbeing of others.

    The transit system has a role to play in this response by virtue of the fact that a measurable percentage of its ‘captive’ ridership (over 30 per cent of transit riders do not have ready access to any other form of transportation) is comprised of people in this group.

    As Chief Officer Clapham said in our press release, “The police need other tools over and above arresting people and putting them in jail. There needs to be a broad based community intervention to give drug dependent people, those with mental issues or anyone in crisis, the services they need. This will rescue a lot of lives, and based on what transit customers tell us, it will do more than anything else to make them feel more secure on the transit system.”

  • Responsibility for security lies with TransLink and the community at large.

    In our survey, 92 per cent of respondents said SkyTrain/TransLink had total or primary responsibility for security inside stations. Elsewhere, people felt that the responsibility was shared.

    More than half of respondents (56%) say the local police shares responsible for security both in the immediate vicinity and on the walkways. Interestingly, on the question of who is responsible for security inside the station, passengers themselves were second-most-identified group, with 41% saying that customers have a personal responsibility for their own safety. (The percentages add up to more than 100 because multiple answers were accepted.)

    “Just as our studies have confirmed that crime is a ‘people’ issue, so is the prevention and cure,” Chief Clapham said. “Everyone has a role to play, from Transit Police, SkyTrain, TransLink, our colleagues in the jurisdictional police departments and anyone who rides the system. The information we’ve gathered will help us determine clearly what those roles are.”

  • A human presence is seen as the most effective way of improving security.

    Of all the measures believed by the public to be effective in improving their sense of security on SkyTrain and in the areas around rapid transit stations and bus loops, nothing is seen to be more effective than a human presence, be it transit staff, police or simply other people. This influences our decision to staff stations that are seen as less secure, and encouraging the development of transit villages.

What happens next?

Well, we’ll start putting in place the many safety measures listed above, according to the four themes of reassurance, engagement, infrastructure, and intervention. And we’ll keep working on consultation and research to better inform our future strategies, not only to deal with crime and the perception of crime in the immediate vicinity of SkyTrain stations, but to prevent crime in the first place.

We really are focused on action, and we will continue to undertake measures to improve security and the perception of security on SkyTrain and its stations.

Comments are welcome below!


27 Comments

  • By Bryn, December 2, 2008 @ 7:09 pm

    I’m all for everything above EXCEPT the police dogs. Come on, we’re not in communist Russia here! I think it is completely reasonable to go about your day without having to get sized up by a giant aggressive attack dog on your way to work.

    Really, I think the police dog thing is going to totally backfire in terms of public perception. Police dogs in the station means the stations are REALLY, REALLY DANGEROUS, otherwise why would the dogs be there? The only other places you see them is after an armed robbery or in a prison…

  • By Sungsu, December 2, 2008 @ 8:22 pm

    This statistic “11 per cent of crimes occur within 250m of a SkyTrain station” is meaningless unless we know what percent of the total land area is within 250m of a SkyTrain station.

    It reminds me of an advertisement I saw for a security company in the U.S. stating that 25% of all break-ins occur between Memorial Day and Labour Day. Seems like a lot until you realize that there are more than three months between the two days.

  • By David, December 2, 2008 @ 8:29 pm

    I’m not sure about the use of dogs either. I’m not even sure what they’re going to be used for? If it’s drug sniffing, I have a problem with unfair arrests. If it’s explosives – well, maybe that’s fair given the hysteria since 9/11 on public transport safety. Guess my two cents, is the dogs are a step too far. I actually don’t like armed police riding the vehicles either – that really makes it feel unsafe to me – I know, strange, but true.

  • By Jhenifer Pabillano, December 3, 2008 @ 9:19 am

    Hi all! Thanks for your comments as usual.

    @Bryn, David:
    Well, as I’ve indicated above, police dogs on transit are not a guaranteed permanent measure — the Transit Police are looking to test public acceptance of the use of police dogs on the SkyTrain system. I’m sure if reaction is negative, like the concerns you have expressed, police dogs would be reconsidered. Again, they’re in early stages of developing this strategy, and feedback like yours is important!

    @Sungsu:
    I don’t think not knowing the percentage of the entire land area within that 250m makes the 11% statistic totally meaningless. Nonetheless, I’ll see if I can get hold of the percentages you’ve asked for!

  • By xl, December 3, 2008 @ 9:34 am

    There is a strong desire to stop crime especially around our Skytrain stations, especially when it gets dark. The current solutions just doesn’t seem to work. I don’t care if it’s a police dog, cameras, Robocop, Judge Dredd, or Krispy Kreme. Something needs to be done. Give the police the tools to do their job easily, effectively and efficiently. If a dog frightens criminals away and increases ridership with neighbourhood livability. Then so be it. I often get sniffed when I come off international flights and dogs have no prejudiced. Otherwise if this experiment doesn’t work out, “can you cook it?” ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pr0Dnn_RdG0 ).

  • By Drew Snider, December 3, 2008 @ 11:06 am

    Jhenifer has asked me to step in here and address the dog issue. I can see why people would be a little concerned about the idea, especially after CTV chose to use a file clip of a fierce looking German Shepherd barking angrily at the camera to illustrate the concept of “police dog”. Actually, the one police dog that’s been tested on the system is a docile black Lab, trained to sniff out explosives or drugs (I didn’t ask which when I saw it on the train a couple of weeks ago), and Chief Clapham noted that different dogs have different “profiles”. Taking down a criminal is only one of them. The idea is still in the testing phase, to see how people accept the dogs. But as Chief Clapham also pointed out, any of the jurisdictional police forces — VPD, RCMP, NWPS — can bring their dog(s) onto the system, as it is.

    As for Sungsu’s query about the use of a 250m catchment area (100m in the longer-term study), I think it’s very meaningful: 11% within that area means 89% are happening more than 3 blocks away from a station. What that does is, it forces us to look at the other “crime attractants” in the vicinity of a station: what else is in the area? Are there bars and night clubs? Areas known for drug activity? Courthouses or parole offices? Then you look at the other “hot spots” (see the maps in the item, “Analysis, Clarity and Action”) and you see that (a) those same factors are present in those locations, (b) SkyTrain stations in areas where those factors are not present don’t show up on the map at all, and (c) the crime picture around SkyTrain stations is no worse than in the community as a whole.

    That’s why Chief Clapham talks about integrated, “holistic” policing that goes beyond simple enforcement. Police work with the community and with other services (health, mental health, social services, etc.) to deal with the root causes of crime anywhere.

    It’s not a SkyTrain problem. It’s a society problem, and as a society, we all have a role to play.

  • By Sungsu, December 3, 2008 @ 12:26 pm

    Drew, you don’t understand. If 90% of the land area is within 250m of a SkyTrain station, and only 11% of crimes occur there, the stations are in fact way safer than areas far from the station. If only 1% of the land area is within 250m of a station, crime is indeed concentrated there, and you then look at the other “crime attractants” as you put it.

  • By Jhenifer Pabillano, December 3, 2008 @ 12:29 pm

    Thanks for the clarification, sungsu. I’m still working on those numbers for you: hopefully we’ll have them soon!

  • By Richard, December 3, 2008 @ 2:16 pm

    Overall, the new security program could be an improvement for the perception of safety and security on skytrain. I have some reservations about the increased presence of dogs on the trains. However, my concerns are not the same as other individual’s concerns, I have concerns because I have a guide dog and we are on the skytrain every day of the week virtually. Our dogs are trained to deal with dog distractions, but on a busy skytrain platform, a distracted guide dog puts my safety in jeopardy because of the possibility of being pulled off the platform in the event either my dog gets distracted or the other dog present is not controlled adequately.

  • By Sungsu, December 3, 2008 @ 2:42 pm

    Furthermore, even land area may not be too useful. Population density might be a better comparator. One would expect there to be more crime where more people live. Thus, what is the “per capita” crime rate near the stations vs. other areas? I would not be surprised if it were statistically the same.

  • By Karen, December 4, 2008 @ 12:41 pm

    The dogs would have been a great thing to talk about the Unconference; pity we didn’t hear anything about them until now, though I suppose I can understand your reluctance. (Either that, or it wasn’t even looked at until after October 4th, I’m assuming.)

    Drew’s use of the term “public acceptance” raises an eyebrow for me. Can either Drew or Jhenifer give us a rundown on what benefit the use of the dogs is expected in addressing problems that already exist or have been experienced on the system by riders? Drew points out that other forces are able to bring their dogs in the system. Does that mean that Transit Police are finding their work impeded by the fact that they don’t have dogs?

    Also, what other places have implemented similar measures? I’m also unclear on how enforcing rules on drug possession relates directly to SkyTrain security. As before, I remain haplessly new to this, so thanks in advance to Jhenifer and Drew for your help and research in addressing our questions on the blog.

  • By Jhenifer Pabillano, December 4, 2008 @ 4:00 pm

    Hi Karen,

    Thanks for your note. I asked Tom Seaman from Transit Police media relations for a response to your questions and here it is:

    “Having “police dogs” on the Transit System is a big… “IF” right now. As a police service we have to look at all ways of maintaining the safety and security of the system. “IF” we learn through research that dogs can enhance this goal then we “MAY” implement such a plan. Our work is not impeded by not having dogs, but we may be able to do more with one or two specifically trained dogs. We would not be roaming the system sniffing people for drugs. We “MAY” want to sniff for explosives though. Again, thinking of safety and security, what would the public response be if some sort of attack took place against the system, and we had not done all we could to prevent or detect that attack.

    Many transit systems around the world use much more stringent security measures, including dogs. Luckily we have not got to that point yet. But, you just have look around the world to see what is taking place and what has been targeted to see what could happen. We already see the dogs in use right here at the airport. I have not heard any protest to that. We move close to 72 million people a year, we owe it to them to do the utmost to protect them.

    As to your question about enforcing drug laws and how it relates to SkyTrain Security. The whole illegal drug trade is connected to other crimes in our communities. Drug addicts commit crimes to get money to buy drugs. Most of our crimes in and around public transit is drug and alcohol related. This includes shootings, stabbings and violent assaults. Drug dealers like public transit stations because of the volume of human traffic.”

  • By Karen, December 5, 2008 @ 10:23 am

    Jhenifer, thanks for obtaining and posting the response from Tom, it is very helpful and enlightening. I’d like to add some further questions to what he’s said.

    Our work is not impeded by not having dogs, but we may be able to do more with one or two specifically trained dogs. We would not be roaming the system sniffing people for drugs. We “MAY” want to sniff for explosives though.

    I’m sure this is comforting to hear, for those of us travelling with small children or who are concerned about those with allergies to dogs. It does beg my next question: is the need urgent or pressing enough so that TransLink needs to invest in having these resources available in-house, rather than collaborating to make use of existing law enforcement resources? I can see that in a pinch it might be time wasted to secure an RCMP resource.

    Again, thinking of safety and security, what would the public response be if some sort of attack took place against the system, and we had not done all we could to prevent or detect that attack.

    In my opinion, statements like this do nothing to support the cause of helping the public accept initiatives like police dogs. We can speculate far and wide on all sorts of things that might happen due to some hazily-defined enemy, and there is certainly no doubt that security and safety are certainly important, but must our everyday peace of mind be continually asked to take a back seat?

    It’s not a black and white issue, for those of us who are trying to build culture and community in our cities – things that affect our collective health and well-being (as well as our economic climate) surely as much as emergencies do. Falling back on a fear-based argument, I feel, simply polarizes the issue rather than sorting out the grey of tradeoffs as communities, neighbours and riders.

  • By Jhenifer Pabillano, December 5, 2008 @ 4:16 pm

    @Karen,
    Tom Seaman sent me this response to your follow-up question:

    “That is a great question. We would be looking at all options. The problem with relying on other departments resources is accessibility. They may not always be available, or response time could be lengthy and costly. That is one of the reasons the Transit Police were created also. If you look at the transit system as a moving city of about 300,000 people, it’s really no different than any other community of the same size. You need infrastructure to support those people and keep them safe.”

  • By xl, December 5, 2008 @ 4:56 pm

    With regards to text messaging for emergencies, is there any plan to retrofit EVDO and CDMA repeaters into the Dunsmuir tunnel? Is there a CDMA/EVDO P3 for the Canada Line in the long Vancouver tunnel? This “dark territory” is a great place for criminals to conduct their activities where victims would be silenced from the outside world. If is also a soft target for 2010 criminals where communication is minimal.

    I can just imagine all the fines we can collect from riders sipping their morning coffee and eating on the trains.

    I’m currently in San Francisco riding through the BART system. I get something like 45 seconds of cell service when the train is at a station, but totally lost between stations.

  • By Tim, December 6, 2008 @ 1:21 pm

    Dogs… If transit police use dogs, to sniff drugs or whatnot, won’t drug dealers become more dangerous by being scared, and perhaps taking the caution of arming themselves more heavily? By using dogs, the problem is just being escalated. If transit is trying to protect people, they should b considering the possibility of hostages being taken, Etc.

  • By Jhenifer Pabillano, December 8, 2008 @ 9:39 am

    Hi Tim,

    Thanks for your comment. I’m not sure if you had a chance to read the comment provided by Tom Seaman from the Transit Police: it’s the one four comments above yours, or you can see it by clicking here.

    Anyway, in his comment, Tom says that using police dogs is a big “if” for the system, and that the Transit Police would likely use only one or two dogs to sniff out explosives on the system, not drugs.

    So, I definitely understand your point about escalation, but as outlined, police dog usage will not be focused on aggressively seeking drugs on the system.

    Hope this helps!

  • By J.Z., December 8, 2008 @ 7:50 pm

    I fail to see how dogs will help security on the system (judging by all the other posts). To me, there’s not enough evidence presented to warrant the use of such dogs. Maybe for special events (i.e. the Olympics), but other than that I think it’s a waste of resources.

    As well, if these dogs are sniffing for drugs, I think you’ll find a ridiculous number of people arrested/what have you, for simple cannabis possession.

    In a city like Vancouver, it would be ignorant not to think that this is the case, which may result in a high percentage drop in ridership simply due to the presence of ‘drug dogs’. While something like this may have the unintended effect of forcing this city to actually deal with the legal status of cannabis possession, I believe it would probably muddle the entire issue and end up causing havoc.

  • By Jhenifer Pabillano, December 9, 2008 @ 9:27 am

    Hi J.Z.,

    Thanks for your comment. Can I draw your attention as well to the comment I’ve made above yours?

    As Tom from Transit Police has indicated, searches for drugs are NOT the reason dogs will be used on the system. Their chief purpose would likely be to sniff out explosives, and a very limited number of dogs would be used on the system (one or two).

    As Tom also indicates, the use of dogs is a big “if” right now. So it is an option we are exploring but are not firmly bent on implementing.

    Thanks for your feedback though. Again, the use of dogs is something we’re exploring, and it’s good to know what you think of the approach.

  • By Jhenifer Pabillano, December 10, 2008 @ 4:59 pm

    Sungsu, aren’t you lucky, I’ve finally got the land percentage numbers you asked for.

    However, I’m not so sure they’re that useful in interpreting the statistics any better, as you also indicated in your comments asking for per capita crime rates. Linh Riddick, the Transit Police crime analyst who generated the numbers for us, explains:

    The issue is much more complex than simply calculating crime rates per capita in these areas as there are so many other factors to consider (population density, movement of people & travel patterns, routine activities, businesses, land usage, income levels, demographics, etc). To compare crime rates in a dense part of the city containing a SkyTrain station such as Surrey Central against another part of Surrey that consists of farm land is not valid or accurate.

    Anyway, the numbers:

    City City Area (km2) % of City Area within 250m buffers of Skytrain
    Surrey 317.4 0%
    Burnaby 96.6 2%
    New Westminster 15.4 6%
    Vancouver 114.67 2%

    (Why is Surrey at 0? Linh explains that the City of Surrey is quite large geographically at 317.4 square kilometers. When a 250m buffer is drawn around each of the 4 Surrey Skytrain stations, these areas combined equate to less than 1 square kilometer: 0.7854 km2 (buffer areas) divided by 317.4 km2 (total city) =  0.0025)

  • By BJ, December 10, 2008 @ 5:01 pm

    Generally, I like the transit police. I have seen them taking drunks and druggies out of the stations in cuffs a couple of times, tending to someone who had just been incapacitated another. Generally, they are quite courteous during fare checks (I even have a favourite transit cop, who’s really pleasant), and overall, they work a lot harder than the other SkyTrain staff. I don’t particularly feel safer when they are on the train or platform – but they are certainly better than the other 14 levels of SkyTrain security. The people with the “security” jackets act like a bunch of super-troopers, and more often that not conduct fare checks at the TOP of the escalator, where there is no room to maneuver, and a constant influx of new people. To combat this, they yell down the escalator for people to have their fares ready… anyone else see the problem here?

    I don’t see what dogs or any other toys are going to magically accomplish. A little focus, and a little less chit-chat would improve things dramatically. Last week, I watched some staff in a conversation, while 7 men walked past with open beers on their way to the Metallica concert. Perhaps more frequent fare-checks, I get it, they do blitzes every few months, but it would be nice to get the undesireables (smellies) off the train the other 12 of those 13 weeks.

    And do more bus checks. There are a lot of people scamming the buses.

  • By Sungsu, December 10, 2008 @ 7:50 pm

    Thanks for the numbers. The only conclusion I draw is that the New Westminster stations are pretty safe.

  • By Eugene T.S. Wong, December 11, 2008 @ 3:46 am

    BJ said, “A little focus, and a little less chit-chat would improve things dramatically. Last week, I watched some staff in a conversation, while 7 men walked past with open beers on their way to the Metallica concert.”.

    I agree. I personally saw a bunch staff members just chatting. I asked another staff member, who wasn’t involved, about that. She just became defensive and made me feel that I was rude. I wasn’t really blaming her or the staff for anything. I was just wondering what they were doing. She made it look like they were always hard at work. I still think that she is wrong.

  • By Warren, January 20, 2009 @ 9:12 am

    I’m all for the dogs…Labradors, not Shepherds. I’ve bred Chocolate Labs before, and When my children were babies, my dogs were absolutely devoted to them… being short-haired, didn’t give my children any problems with allergies. They were so well behaved,bathing and shampooing them was a dream. Using smaller breeds of Labs to sniff drugs and bombs, I think, would be a valuable asset to the public. Chocolate Labs are also much smaller, smarter, and more docile.I believe they’re some of the cleanest,finest dogs on the planet.

    SECONDLY, I’m in a wheelchair… last night a drunk stumbled onto me while he was getting off a Skytrain … almost broke my ankle. I was patiently waiting on the Broadway platform for people to get off. There were ransit Police on the platform but they were just too busy to deal with all the drunks coming home from the hockey game. I don’t know what Translink’s policy is but my feeling is that they should have is Zero Tolerance for drunks on the buses and Skytrains. Public Drunkenness on public transportation is a common occurence… It’s high time Translink issued a report on which cities/municipalities co-operate on zoning/policing/support issues. Translink is getting a lot of heat for it’s projected funding shortfall but the media has no sense of the value of the policing and other services offloaded on Translink by the various jurisdictions that Skytrain/bus routes travel through. Maybe if our police services started policing public transit facilities at the same ratio as commuters in motor vehicles they would be a welcome sight to commuters using our public transit system.
    Somehow drunks have to realize that they face stiff penalties whether they drive or use public transit while intoxicated.

  • By Kaftpiott, January 9, 2010 @ 5:41 pm

    Where is a good place to sale my old wrecked car? Please help me by sugesting some sites or companies.

Other Links to this Post

  1. City Bus Drivers Say That Fare Beaters Have the Upper Hand in Confrontations « Stephen Rees’s blog — December 5, 2008 @ 12:19 pm

  2. Security Dogs on Skytrain » Vancouver Blog Miss 604 by Rebecca Bollwitt — December 8, 2008 @ 6:22 pm

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