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New wayfinding signage is going up around the region

New wayfinding signage is going up around the region

Old and new bus stop signs in North Vancouver. You can hardly see the old sign!

Astute riders may have noticed some new signage up at bus stops and transit exchanges in the region lately! It’s all part of our new wayfinding strategy, designed to help everyone better understand the transit system. (For more, check out Robert’s overview post on the strategy here.)

I got planner Jeff Deby to help explain what new signage is out there right now. Here we go!

New signage at selected bus stops

The old and new bus stop plates.

First, stops that currently have narrow bus stop signage are being replaced with new T-plates, which also carry text identifying the location of the stop.

You can probably guess why these are an improvement on the old signs, but here’s a list anyway:

  • You can now quickly see the bus stop from far away
  • You now know the exact location of the bus stop
  • The location written on the sign matches the location description in our trip planner and the audio announcements on the bus!

The replacement work is starting in North Vancouver, and the majority of their stops with narrow signage should be changed over this year—about 200 have been installed so far. (North Vancouver was already scheduled for regular bus stop signage replacement work this year, so that’s why we’ve started there first.)

New maps and signage at transit exchanges

The new Regional Transit Map. Click the image to download a large PDF version.
Detail of the Regional Transit Map.

The next big development is the new wayfinding signage up at selected SkyTrain stations and their associated bus loops—all the downtown Expo and Millennium Line stations, plus Lonsdale Quay, Marine Drive, Richmond-Brighouse, Bridgeport, and New Westminster. (And soon, new maps and signage will be installed at Expo Line stations, included with the renovations to install faregates.)

That includes updated maps showing nearby bus routes, locations where you can walk to, and a brand new Regional Transit Map! Grab it as a PDF here.

The Regional Transit Map shows ALL the transit service in our system, and the new version has lots of great improvements, including:

  • It’s a large format that shows the entire transit system on one page (the previous version stopped just past Pitt Meadows—you had to look on the back for Langley and Maple Ridge)
  • Regular service and limited service buses are clearly distinguished (so riders know not to expect buses that run just in the peak to come along all day)
  • Bus routes are easier to follow, as the lines have been carefully distinguished in tricky spots on the map
  • NightBus has been separated out as its own map, so riders won’t think NightBuses are available during the day
  • the Frequent Transit Network corridors are now shown, so you can figure out which streets to quickly catch a bus!

(Eagle eyes will also note that the Frequent Transit Network highlighting on this map is consistent with the colours used on the actual Frequent Transit Network map, too. Synergy!)

New loop signage

Stops at these bus loops also have new signage, to better indicate the bay locations and the associated buses at those stops.

In the future, all bus stops that have routes listed on them will look like these loop stops!

Next steps

The full rollout will continue throughout the region in the coming year, especially in concert with renovation projects and the like. And signs will also be replaced on an ongoing basis around the region as needed: for example, if a bus stop gets damaged.

We don’t have confirmed dates on the rollout yet, but we will keep you updated as it unfolds. If you have specific feedback, please make sure to submit it through the Customer Feedback Form or at 604-953-3333, so we can log your concern and get it to the wayfinding team.

And of course, your comments are welcome below!