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A closer look at the LEGO model of King Edward Station

A closer look at the LEGO model of King Edward Station

King Edward Station from the Canada Line, modeled in LEGO by Dan Emerson. Photo by Sandy Webster.
King Edward Station from the Canada Line, modeled in LEGO by Dan Emerson. Photo by Sandy Webster.

As you may know already, Science World is currently hosting a LEGO exhibition that involves two Canada Line stations modeled in the famous building blocks — YVR-Airport and King Edward Stations!

I wrote a post last week about the YVR model, and now here’s a look at the King Edward Station replica.

A side view of the King Edward Station model. The Jugo Juice is in yellow, to the right of the centre of the photo. Photo by Sandy Webster.
A side view of the King Edward Station model. The Jugo Juice is in yellow, to the right of the centre of the photo. Photo by Sandy Webster.

The King Edward model was built by Dan Emerson, a local LEGO hobbyist, with a little help from his 11-year old son.

It’s a cutaway model showcasing the underground station and its two platform levels, with a train that actually rolls on the tracks.

Dan even added a Jugo Juice retailer, a park at the top level, and a multicultural array of people populating the station.

“The whole thing was fun,” he said. “I’ve never done something for public display, so I took a little care and extra attention in the details.”

Another side view of the King Edward Station model. The train has its own cutaway – you can see right inside it! Photo by Sandy Webster.
Another side view of the King Edward Station model. The train has its own cutaway – you can see right inside it! Photo by Sandy Webster.

Dan was asked to build the model by Sandy Webster, a good friend of Dan’s who also happens to be communications manager for InTransit BC. (That’s the SNC-Lavalin-led company doing the engineering and construction of the Canada Line.)

The station took Dan eight weeks to build. He began with the train, and once its look was finalized, he was able to build the track, tunnels, and station in proportion.

Dan actually had to creatively visualize most of the model—he was only given a 3-D line drawing with very little detail at the start, and got to visit the actual station about four weeks into his project.

Looking directly at the train. Photo by Sandy Webster.
Looking directly at the train. Photo by Sandy Webster.

“I had no idea how big it would be, because I didn’t have any pictures of the inside,” he said. “So I started on the floor, and it went onto a coffee table, and then ended up on my kitchen island. I had LEGO everywhere!”

And what’s next for the model, once the Science World show is finished?

“It’ll probably sit in the house for a while and then we’ll take it apart,” Dan said. “That’s the beauty of LEGO. It can be a different toy every day.”

Again, if you’d like to go down and see the models, the exhibition will run until May 4 at Science World. The exhibit features many more Lego replicas of local transportation, including an enormous B.C. Ferry!