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Take transit to these regional parks in Metro Vancouver

Take transit to these regional parks in Metro Vancouver

232 Phibbs Exchange bus passing by the Capilano River Regional Park sign
(Mark McGovern/TransLink)

Exploring regional parks is a great way to take in the natural wonder of our region — discovering new trails, learning about wildlife, all while reconnecting with nature and/or your company. Not all parks are remote, you can travel to many of them car-free!

Bring your family and friends to walk or bike with you to these transit-friendly regional parks in Metro Vancouver.

All you need is our handy Trip Planner to explore the region by bus, SkyTrain, or SeaBus. Ride transit and enjoy the car-free days of summer!

Capilano River Regional Park

Capilano River Regional Park takes you to a 26-kilometre trail where you’ll be walking under towering fir and cedar trees and the hearing the roaring current of the Capilano River. In the area is also a fish hatchery, picnic areas, and the Cleveland Dam.

Where: 5077 Capilano Rd, North Vancouver

Transit: Routes 232, 236, and 249 will take you nearby. Find your route.

Pacific Spirit Regional Park

Pacific Spirit Regional Park takes you to forests, creeks, beaches, and the Camosun bog — a freshwater wetland that used to be a large source of food and other trade commodities for the Musqueam people. It is also home to a variety of plants and animals which you can explore either through a 55-kilometre hike or a 37-kilometre cycling trail.

Where: Chancellor Boulevard, Vancouver

Transit: Several routes like 44, 4, and 84 will take you nearby. Find your route.

Burnaby Lake Regional Park

With a butterfly garden and a turtle and bird habitat, Burnaby Lake Regional Park is a great park to bring the kids along. The lake is surrounded by a level walking trail. Along the way, you can walk on the Piper Spit Walkway and up the viewing tower.

Where: 4519 Piper Ave, Burnaby

Transit: The Millennium Line to Lake City Way Station and/or Route 110 will take you close to the park.

Tynehead Regional Park

Bike or walk through the forest and meadow in Tynehead Regional Park. In the park is Tynehead salmon hatchery and a fish habitat along the Serpentine River.

Where: 16689 96 Ave, Surrey

Transit: Routes 335 and 337 will take you close to the area. Find your route.

təmtəmíxʷtən/Belcarra Regional Park

Belcarra Regional Park takes you to popular summer destinations such as Sasamat Lake and White Pine Beach. There is a 22-kilometre trail that takes you through a forest or you can do a short hike to Admiralty Point.

Where: 2375 Bedwell Bay Rd, Belcarra

Transit: Route 182 will take you close to the park. If you’re coming from Vancouver, take the Millennium Line and catch Route 182 at Moody Centre Station. Find your route.

Kanaka Creek Regional Park

Kanaka Creek Regional Park features waterfalls, sandstone cliffs, and a 10-kilometre trail great for walking and mountain biking. Stop by the fish fence and the hatchery to watch salmon!

Where: 11450 256 St, Maple Ridge

Transit: Route 701 will take you close to the area. If you’re coming from Vancouver, take the Millennium Line and catch Route 701 at Coquitlam Central Station. Find your exact route.

Boundary Bay Regional Park

Looking to get your steps in on a flat trail? Come to this park of sandy beach and tidal flats. Walk or bike on the 17-kilometre Dyke Trail and take in the wide-open landscape view. You might even see horses walking along the equestrian-shared trail at Boundary Bay Regional Park!

Where: Boundary Bay Rd, Delta

Transit: Several routes like 601, 603, and 619 serve the area. Find your route on our Trip Planner.

Natural land and waterscapes are a staple in our region and the whole province. After all, it’s called “Beautiful British Columbia” for a reason. Regional parks are only one of many destinations that make our region beautiful. We can take you there.

A trail post showing the map of Pacific Spirit Regional Park. A person walks in to Sword Fern Trail.
(Mark McGovern/TransLink)
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