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Translink Buzzer Blog

Compass 101 videos help you make the move to the Compass Card!

We’ve produced some Compass Card how-to videos now that Compass Cards are widely available for our riders! These are the first three videos in the Compass 101 series.

You’ll want to check the blog and subscribe to the TransLink YouTube channel, so you’ll get the latest videos we’ll be uploading over the next couple of weeks. We’ll also be adding to the Compass 101 playlist as we upload new videos.

Let us know what you think of them. Please note, these are short videos without every detail you might want to know about Compass and faregates. You’ll want to read all about Compass on our website as well as get your Compass questions answered on AskCompass.ca. Enjoy!

Author: Robert Willis

Buzzer blog editor away for a week

I should really get a new photo;) See you all in a week and a bit

I should really get a new photo… See you all soon!

The blog will be on vacation until August 24, 2015. During that time, Laura will be minding the shop.

However, she’ll be busy planning for I Love Transit Week 2015, so don’t expect too many posts and replies to comments between today and the 24th.

There’s a lot to talk about and announce when I’m back.

See you all soon!

Announcing I Love Transit Week 2015: Aug 31-Sept 4 – two camps and more!

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It’s time again to tell everyone why we love transit!
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For the seventh year in a row, we are dedicating our digital channels, the print Buzzer, time and thoughts to the love of transit! Between August 31 and September 4, the blog will feature items like we’ve seen in years past and more! Those items have included haikus, reflective essays, pictures, stories about finding love on transit, a wedding on a bus, paintings, a cake, a crossword and even a song!

Much of what we feature comes from Buzzer readers. So, make sure you tell us why you love transit, and we’ll share it on the blog!

We try to do things a little different each year for I Love Transit Week. This year, we have two in-person events we hope you can take part in!

Join us on one of two I Love Transit Camps!

Last year, we introduced I Love Transit Camp into the week. It was such a success that we’re doing it again…twice!

I Love Transit Camp (Kids) September 1


Take a look at what we did last year. This year will be similar, but a little different!

I Love Transit Camp for kids is an opportunity for kids between the ages of eight and 12 to visit TransLink operating companies’ facilities to learn about how transit works and have some fun at the same time!

Inside one of the buildings at OMC!

Inside one of the buildings at OMC!

The day will start around 9 am at Edmonds Station, and we’ll head to SkyTrain Operations and Maintenance Centre (OMC). While there, we’ll visit where the SkyTrain is maintained and cleaned as well as the SkyTrain Control. Kids will get a chance to use the SkyTrain simulator, ask questions of SkyTrain staff and even take a trip on a train around the OMC testing track! After that, we’ll have a little lunch then say goodbye to OMC.

Next, we’ll hop back on SkyTrain and head for Gilmore Station. Once there, we’ll take a ride on a bus and get a behind-the-scenes tour of Burnaby Transit Centre!

We’ll see the fleet overhaul and where they fix and update almost everything on a bus, including the painting of buses and reupholstering of seats. We’ll also get a tour of the bus yard with articulated and 40-foot buses!

Transit Police car

A Transit Police car!

Afterwards, we’ll get to have fun on a 40-foot bus and talk to a bus operator instructor about what it’s like to drive a bus. Finally, we’ll get to talk with Transit Police and maybe Transit Security about everything they do. I’m told they’ll be bringing their vehicles and a special guest if we are lucky! Then, we’ll get back on a bus and drop everyone off at Gilmore Station. The day should wrap up around four o’clock.

Throughout the day, we’ll be taking breaks for short and fun games and other great stuff!

How to take part

Due to safety concerns for both OMC and BTC, we’re only able to take a maximum of 20 people on the camp. That means 10 kids (ages 8-12) and their guardians will be able to participate in the camp. Interested in a fun day on transit? If you’d like to participate, we’ll need kids to tell us (in 50 words or less) what they love about transit! And if you like, you can also submit a photo and/or a video as part of your entry. Before you or your little one starts typing or writing, you’ll want to read the participation guidelines.

Send your submissions to thebuzzer@translink.ca with “I Love Transit Camp Kids” in the subject field, or you can surface mail it to The Buzzer, 400 – 287 Nelson’s Court, New Westminster, BC, V3L 0E7. Be sure to include your name, age, where you heard about the camp, and the phone number and name of the guardian you wish to bring with you!

The deadline for submissions is August 24. If you are selected, we’ll need a participation form filled out by August 28.

We can’t wait for camp and to look through your submissions! Here are a few from last year!
Matthew, Andy, and Trevor were among the lucky kids who had the opportunity to attend I Love Transit Camp. Check out their submissions!

Andy with his bus and SkyTrain cut outs!

Andy with his bus and SkyTrain cut outs!

Trevor and his collection of bus models!

Trevor and his collection of bus models!

I Love Transit Camp (Adults) September 3

It’s time to spread the love with the adult community of the Buzzer blog and those who just plain love transit! The first I Love Transit Camp for adults (age 16 13 and up) is an opportunity for adults to visit Burnaby Transit Centre and have some fun while you’re at it! UPDATE: all participants under the age of 18 who wish to attend must be accompanied by a parent/guardian or adult 19 years or older.

BTC fleet overhaul!

BTC fleet overhaul!

The day will start shortly after noon at Gilmore Station. Once there, we’ll take a ride on the bus and get a behind-the-scenes tour of Burnaby Transit Centre! We’ll see the fleet overhaul where they can fix and update almost everything on a bus, including the painting of buses and reupholstering of seats. We’ll also get a tour of the bus yard with articulated and 40-foot buses!

Afterwards, we’ll get to have fun on a 40-foot bus and play some games. We‘re planning some other activities and people to meet. Stay tuned on that! At the end of the day, we’ll get back on a bus and drop everyone off at Gilmore Station. The day should wrap up around four o’clock.

If there’s something you want to see or do specifically at BTC, let us know! We’ll try our best to accommodate your request.

How to take part

Due to safety concerns at BTC, we’re only able to take a maximum of 20 people on the camp. This means 20 adults will be able to participate in the camp. Interested in a fun day on transit? If you’d like to participate, we’ll need you to tell us (in 50 words or less) what you love about transit! And if you like, you can also submit a photo and/or a video as part of your entry. Before you start typing or writing, you’ll want to read the participation guidelines.

Send your submissions to thebuzzer@translink.ca with “I Love Transit Camp Adults” in the subject field, or you can surface mail it to The Buzzer, 400 – 287 Nelson’s Court, New Westminster, BC, V3L 0E7. Be sure to include your name, age, where you heard about the camp, and phone number!

The deadline for submissions is August 24. If you are selected, we’ll need a participation form filled out by August 28.

As the week approaches, we’ll fill blog readers in on more details about the camp. We’ll also let you know about contests during the week with some awesome prizes. Oh, and don’t forget to colour the latest edition of the print Buzzer. You could win a FareCard!

The Buzzer team is looking forward to it. Hope you are too!

Cutting back on washing to save water

Bus wash closed at Surrey Transit Centre

Bus wash closed at Surrey Transit Centre

Reducing water use isn’t just happening in your home, it’s also happening at our bus depots. That’s right, we’re cutting back on washing buses to help with water conservation efforts in Metro Vancouver. I’ve copied and pasted our press release about it below:

In an effort to conserve water during the current water shortage in the region, TransLink has suspended washing the exterior of its buses until further notice.

An unusually dry and hot May and June has depleted Metro Vancouver’s water reservoirs.

Buses are typically washed at our transit centres at the end of each service day. Our bus wash system uses reclaimed water for the majority of the wash cycle, except the final rinse which uses fresh water.

Last week, we started washing buses every second day. And now, we will only do exterior washing in exceptional circumstances. At our largest facility, Vancouver Transit Centre where we maintain more than 500 buses, that translates to 30,000 litres of water conserved each day.

The decision to suspend bus washing is something we’ve done during previous water shortages, as part of our commitment to conservation.

The interior of buses will continue to be cleaned for the comfort of passengers and employees.

Interested in how we wash our buses normally? Check out the Surrey bus wash facility and how it reclaims 80 per cent of the water used!

The conductorettes: the first women to drive transit in Vancouver

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A group of conductorettes after finishing a training course in the 1940s. They were at first issued skirts as part of their uniform, but this image shows the transition to pants. Skirts were difficult to manage when climbing the trolley to reset the poles! Photo courtesy of the Coast Mountain Bus Company Archives.

A group of 33 conductorettes posing in front of the 16th Avenue streetcar at Prior Street barns in 1944. They were at first issued skirts as part of their uniform, but this image shows the transition to pants. Skirts were difficult to manage when climbing the trolley to reset the poles! Photo courtesy of the Coast Mountain Bus Company Archives. Click for a larger version.


Repost: Written by Jhenifer Pabillano and originally published November 9, 2009

Today, I’m pleased to present the story of the conductorettes, a group of 180 women who were the only women operating transit vehicles between 1943 and 1975.

And I’m especially pleased to tell you that this article includes an audio podcast containing interview excerpts from three former conductorettes.

Again, Lisa Codd, the curator at the Burnaby Village Museum, helped me put this article together, based on the research of Lynda Maeve Orr, the Museum’s Assistant Programmer. It’s a continued collaboration to explore transit history and Burnaby’s archival holdings!

Read more »

You Keep Us Moving – Burney

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I had the pleasure of meeting Burney Reid and helped to put this video together. A nicer, more dedicated guy you couldn’t meet. Burney is a member of the Coast Mountain Bus Company road crew. As he points out in the video, he’s been a mechanic working on buses for twenty years!

Roughly seven years ago, CMBC started the Road Crew to avoid towing buses with small technical issues back to the garage. Instead, the Road Crew fixes issues on the road — flat tires, doors not working correctly and other minor issues. Fixing issues of this nature on the road decreases the customer impact.

Burney uses words like “triage” and “first responders” when he describes what he does. In the past, if a bus had an issue like a broken mirror, an operator might have had to leave their route and return to their depot to have it fixed. That of course disrupts riders journeys and is costly since another bus would need to be put in service. With the CMBC Road Crew, quick repairs can be made and a bus can get back on their route, often with minimal to no delays in service.

Let us know what you think of the video and if you have any questions about the Road Crew. We’ll pass them on and get them answered!

June 9, 2015 SkyTrain disruption update

Interim CEO Doug Allen and independent reviewer Gary McNeil spoke to the media today about yesterday’s SkyTrain disruption as well as progress made on Mr. McNeil’s report on SkyTrain.

As noted by Doug Allen, TransLink has improved in the response time to SkyTrain disruptions, but work still needs to be done to make it quicker.

After the above press conference this morning, a technical debriefing was held regarding the initial cause of the disruption. Below are a couple images of the damaged linear induction motor on one of our SkyTrain cars. The exact cause of the damage is still being investigated.

linear induction motor damage

linear induction motor damage

Another view of the damaged linear induction motor

Another view of the damaged linear induction motor

If you weren’t aware of the disruption yesterday, below is a statement TransLink issued to media and shared via social media:

We thank our customers for their patience and apologize for the major inconvenience they experienced this afternoon because of the SkyTrain delay. The delay occurred at the peak of rush hour service, which affected our most regular daily customers. While we recognize the inconvenience and longer commute times, we appreciate their patience and calm behaviour while our staff worked to repair the problem and help redirect customers via alternate means.

While the specific cause of the delay is still under investigation, a technical issue at 4:10 p.m. caused 19 trains between Royal Oak and Waterfront stations to stop running. Expo Line trains continued to run between Edmonds and King George stations, and Millennium Line trains continued to run between Columbia and VCC-Clark stations.

Many trains were stopped between stations; several were attended by a SkyTrain Attendant within 5-10 minutes and driven manually to the nearest station. Staff attended the majority of the remainder of the trains within 30 minutes.

Customers broke out of three different trains in the Nanaimo SkyTrain area, so we had to turn off power in the area to ensure customers were safe and clear of trains. Attending to these customers delayed SkyTrain system recovery by an additional hour.

25 buses provided shuttle service between affected stations. We deployed over 100 staff to help customers, respond to questions and assist with crowds – including 60 SkyTrain Attendants on trains and at stations; 16 Transit Police officers and five Transit Security units; 13 support staff; and eight transit supervisors.

7 additional technicians worked to bring the system back on as quickly as possible.

By 6:10 p.m., we were able to provide some service with SkyTrain Attendants manually driving trains in the affected area. We restored full service by 6:45 p.m.

The Facts Matter: How TransLink spends each dollar

The breakdown of how TransLink spent each dollar in 2013.

The breakdown of how TransLink spent each dollar in 2013.

Just how does TransLink spend each dollar? Well, here’s a handy graphic that answers that question.

As you can see, these 2013 numbers show that the majority of the money is spent on delivering transit and keeping the system in good repair (transit/cycling infrastructure and capital repayment = 89¢). The remainder is spent on making sure people, goods and services can move smoothly on the Major Road Network and the five bridges TransLink is responsible for (roads and bridges = 3¢) as well as making sure the transit system is safe (transit police = 3¢). What’s left goes to administration and preparing for the future (administration and planning = 5¢).

Want to know more about how TransLink invests in transportation and where and how the money is used? You’ll want to check out The Facts Matter page. You can also read all about it here in the coming weeks as well as on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the #TheFactsMatter hashtag.

The Facts Matter: A new series about TransLink and its operating companies

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TransLink's main areas of responsibility

TransLink’s main areas of responsibility

We have a new section on our website we’re excited to share: The Facts Matter.

Unlike most transit authorities in North America, TransLink’s mandate is more than just public transit. Besides the conventional buses, HandyDART, SkyTrain, SeaBus and West Coast Express fleets, we’re also responsible for the Major Roads Network, five bridges, cycling infrastructure and transit police.

Of course, readers of this blog know all this. But not everyone is as informed as Buzzer readers ;) .

What many aren’t familiar with are the details about how our public funds are spent in order to fulfill our mandate. That’s why we’ve added these facts to our website and are sharing them on social media and the transit system.

 The Facts Matter page on the TransLink website is a great resource for many of the questions our riders ask us on a regular bases. The facts on this page include:

  • How TransLink spends taxpayers’ money
  • How TransLink compares to other transit authorities
  • How others, including our customers, describe TransLink’s performance
  • How TransLink keeps costs down
  • CEO compensation
  • A breakdown of TransLink road and cycling investments by each geographical region in Metro Vancouver

As a public institution, it’s important to us that the public is informed about what TransLink does with public funds. Below is a breakdown of the how we spent your money in 2014.

TransLink's investments in transportation in 2014

TransLink’s investments in transportation in 2014

Our 2014 total fleet number
So how do our 2014 investment numbers translate into the our vehicle fleet numbers?

Currently we have more than 2,100 vehicles in our different fleets. Follow this link to find the specific numbers of each vehicle fleet as of 2013. Our fleets fluctuate in size throughout the year and we audit the fleet numbers every two years. So we won’t have 2014 numbers until 2016.

Over the next few months, we’ll be posting and delving into the different facts in this series.

As always, we encourage your questions and will try our best to find answers for you.

Do you know someone who has questions about TransLink and how we invest in the transportation needs of Metro Vancouver? Please share these facts with them and encourage them to post a comment!

 

 

SkyTrain Attendants are now wearing high-visibility vests!

Check out the new vests!

Check out the new vests!

Taking the SkyTrain this week? You’ll see SkyTrain staff sporting a new look. Starting today, SkyTrain Attendants, Supervisors and Duty Managers on the Expo and Millennium lines are wearing new, high-visibility vests!

These vests will help ensure our customers can immediately identify front-line SkyTrain staff if they require assistance or help during an emergency.

Making our front-line staff more visible was one of the recommendations in the independent review of SkyTrain service.

“It is also important that staff in the field be quickly recognized as SkyTrain employees even when there is normal operating service. All front-line staff should wear high visibility vests over their clothing. This will make them easily recognizable in times of minor or major crisis.”

Sky Train Attendants’ vests are a yellow/royal blue combination and made of Gore-Tex. They’re light and versatile, and most importantly, help them stand out amidst a sea of commuters. They say, “SkyTrain Customer Service” across the back and over the chest pocket.

Of note, Canada Line Attendants already have uniforms that are compliant with the independent review.

Independent Review

Gary McNeil presented TransLink with an independent review of the SkyTrain service disruptions that occurred in July, 2014. His recommendations addressed improvements in operations, maintenance and customer service delivery.

We accepted all 20 of his recommendations and many have already been implemented. The rest will be put in action over the course of the next few years.

What do you think?
Leave a comment below. We want to know!

TransLink’s family of companies named one of BC’s Top Employers!

2015 Top Employers pic with Kevin

We are one of BC’s Top Employers!

I have some exciting news! We’re pleased to share a recent award with all our employees, customers, and just about everyone who crosses our path! We’re very proud to announce that TransLink and our operating companies have been named a BC Top Employer.

All of our almost 7,000 employees make us feel like a Top Employer every day. They work hard to provide an efficient, safe and reliable transit and transportation system, supporting the enviable lifestyle we all enjoy in the Metro Vancouver region.

This honour was announced this morning in a special supplement to the Vancouver Sun. As an enterprise, this is the first time we’ve achieved this distinction.

What does it mean to be a Top Employer?

BC’s Top Employers is an annual competition organized by the editors of Canada’s Top 100 Employers and is now in its tenth year. This special designation recognizes the BC employers who lead their industries in offering exceptional places to work. Employers are evaluated on different criteria ranging from physical workplace to benefits and community involvement. Check out the reasons for selection.

Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas – Carl Guardino

The first of the SFU lecture series this year!

TransLink in collaboration with the SFU City Program is pleased to announce another installment of the Rethinking Transportation: New Voices, New Ideas series. This latest installment is with Carl Guardino, widely lauded as one of the most influential forces on transportation policy and funding in the San Francisco and Silicon Valley area, where such ballot measures are routine and have successfully funded major transportation improvements.

Here’s a bit about Mr. Guardino’s talk and about the man himself:

 

Transportation Referendum: Lessons Learned from the Front Line

 

A healthy and competitive economy relies on efficient transportation. In Metro Vancouver, we are increasingly facing some of the worst traffic congestion in Canada. The region’s mayors have developed a Transportation and Transit Plan to cut congestion; keep people, jobs and our economy moving, and accommodate a million more people expected here by 2040.

This spring, Metro Vancouver voters will have a say on these proposed transportation and transit improvements through a referendum—the first of its kind in Canada.

Carl Guardino is widely lauded as one of the most influential forces on transportation policy and funding in the San Francisco and Silicon Valley area, where such ballot measures are routine and have successfully funded major transportation improvements.

Carl will share lessons learned from a region that has been recognized for its progress and innovation, and how this experience might help engage and inform Metro Vancouver residents as we weigh the important decision before us.

 

About Carl Guardino

 

Carl Guardino is the President and CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, a public policy trade association that represents more than 385 of Silicon Valley’s most respected companies.

He also serves as the Chair of the California Transportation Commission, an independent public agency responsible for programming and allocating of funds for the construction of highway, passenger rail and transit improvements throughout California.

Guardino led efforts that resulted in $1.4 billion of funding for 19 key road and rail improvements and co-managed a traffic relief initiative that will generate $5.5 billion in local funds for transit improvements.

His experience in building consensus around transportation measures, successful managing of referenda and activating business leaders to promote sustainable transportation will make an excellent contribution to the current transportation dialogue in our region.

 

Event Details:

Monday, January 19, 7 to 9 p.m.

Simon Fraser University Harbour Centre

Room 1400, SFU Harbour Centre, 515 W Hastings Street, Vancouver

Reservations: Admission is free, but reservations are required. Reserve

This lecture will also be live webcast. Reservations are not required for the webcast.

 

For more info on this series check out the SFU page or read some our past posts. And remember, you can always post your questions about this series here as well as following the hashtag #movingthefuture on Twitter.

 

 

The Mayors’ Council announce transit referendum question

The Mayors’ Council have voted this morning to ask the public to vote yes or no to a .5% increase in the Provincial sales tax in order to expand the regional transit and transportation system in Metro Vancouver. If approved by the Provincial Government of BC, the proposed yes or no referendum could start as soon as March of 2015.

The Mayors’ Council website has been updated with the above video and accompanying information including the press release with the proposed referendum question. For answers to referendum and Mayors’ Council questions, you’ll want to follow @CutCongestion on Twitter and the CutCongestion Facebook page. You’ll also want to sign up for updates.

Donald is one of 200 million passengers on the Canada Line

Canada Line

The Canada Line will surpass 200 million passengers this month! We’re sharing stories about the Canada Line on the Buzzer blog leading up to this month’s celebratory event.

Donald takes the Canada Line five days a week and sometimes more!

Donald takes the Canada Line four days a week and sometimes more!

Donald McDonald is one of those what-you-see-is-what-you-get kind of guys. When I started to ask the knowledgeable electrician about his experience using the Canada Line, his beaming smile gave me a good indication of what he was going to say.

“I take the train because it’s convenient. I don’t have to pay too much attention. It means I don’t have to rush because I know when a train will be there.”

Donald has been taking the Canada Line for past four years. He’s an Electrician and Baggage Supervisor at YVR Airport. He basically helps to make sure that the journey a passenger’s bags make between when they are checking in their bag and when they are loaded onto a plane is successful. As he says, “There’s a lot that goes on behind that curtain your bag goes behind.”

Growing up in South Vancouver, Donald has recently returned to the area and lives a few blocks from the Marine Drive Canada Line station. He takes the first train of the day at 5:05 am, which gets him to work before he starts his day at six a.m.

While on the train, he enjoys a hot tea and reads his emails in preparation of his day ahead.

Donald occasionally needs to drive to work if he’s on an earlier morning shift. “Driving is actually more expensive than taking the train,” says Donald. “I need to pay for parking and for maintenance of the vehicle.”

Before the Canada Line was open, Donald was traveling from Mission an hour and a half one way to YVR. Now living in Vancouver and using the Canada Line, Donald says, “I can park my truck [at home] five days a week and save some money.”

Living so close to the Canada Line, Donald uses the train outside of work hours as well. “I take the Canada Line downtown all the time or to the Cambie corridor,” says Donald. He continues to tell me that his time on the train lets him catch up with texts from his daughter.

Donald is just one of nearly 200 million people to have taken Canada Line since it opened in 2009. Do you have a story about Canada Line? Please leave it in the comments section below!

Travel tips for the post Labour Day crunch

Time to get into the September swing of things

Time to get into the September swing of things

Are you ready for Tuesday and the first week of school? If you’re like many, you’ll be enjoying your last few days of holidays this long weekend and worrying about next week…next week. Well, the buzzer is here to give you a little help with some light reading on how you can make next week a little less stressful when it comes to commuting.

You can bet your bottom dollar that major bus routes and SkyTrains will have more people on them during the morning and afternoon rush hour next week. This phenomenon, known as the Post-Labour Day Crunch (PLDC), can be challenging for both our returning and regular riders. To ease the transition to PLDC, we’ve created some helpful tips to improve your transit experience.

Advice for transit riders

1. Keep your fare handy
Plan your trip in advance using our Trip Planner and familiarize yourself with the route. When boarding (especially a bus), have your valid fare or cash ready or in hand so you are not holding back the line.

2. Patience young grasshopper
We’ve had a long summer. Not everyone will remember the best way to travel back to school or work. The first few weeks of September will likely be the busiest as our 1.2 million riders per day plan their best route options. Count on your trips taking a bit longer – if they don’t, bonus!

3. Try time shifting
This sounds more fancy than it is, but it’s useful! SkyTrain’s busiest spots, especially at the ‘peak of the peak’ times are at the Commercial/Broadway, Production Way/University and Brighouse stations. So, try traveling during off-peak hours.

For example, at the Commercial/Broadway station, there’s usually a long line-up for the #99 B-Line bus from about 8:15 to 8:45 am, but only a short wait immediately before or after. To alleviate long lineups and queuing challenges, we now have painted lines on sidewalks to help direct passengers and free sidewalk space for walkers. Upstairs at Commercial-Broadway SkyTrain Station platforms 3 and 4, there is a steady build-up of passengers between 7-8 a.m. and then the heaviest loads between 8-8:45 a.m. before the rush begins tapering off to normal daytime volumes by about 9:30 a.m.

Canada Line sees its heaviest crowds at the Brighouse Station between 7:30 and 8:30 a.m.

4. About that backpack…
For those using backpacks, please be kind to your fellow passengers by carrying or putting your backpack down by your feet. Remember, don’t be a birdie big bags and put them on the seat beside you.

5. There is no “I” in Team
Cooperation makes getting through PLDC easier for everyone. Remember to move away from the doors to allow more room for others to get on. On SkyTrain station platforms, please stand back so passengers can leave the train more easily. The sooner they’re off, the easier you can get on.

6. Alternatives are a good thing
As everyone tries to get on major bus routes and SkyTrains, it’s always a good idea to see if there are any alternative ways to get to your destination faster. Check out our TravelSmart program to learn about other travel options such as walking, cycling, or carpooling. Mixing modes of travel may also speed up your journey and avoid the crowds.

If you are heading from Yaletown to Metrotown Station, instead of transferring from Yaletown to Waterfront Station on the Canada Line and then hopping on the Expo line to get off at Metrotown Station, why not walk from Yaletown Station to Granville Station – a direct connection to the Expo line. A 15-minute walk can save you time and benefit your health.

Choosing smarter, sustainable modes of travel benefits our health, our communities and the environment.

 

Advice for motorists

1. Sharing is more fun

Consider ride-sharing, shifting your travel times or even arranging to work from home if possible to reduce the number of vehicles trying to move in the peak traffic periods.

2. Slow your roll

Remember that school zone speed limits will be in effect again. Watch out for kids going to kindergarten and elementary classes!

3. Bikes are vehicles too

More people will be cycling to work and school, so drivers also need to take care near cycling lanes and to watch for cyclists when changing lanes or making turns.

4. Do the time shift

See #3 in Advice for transit riders above.

Advice for pedestrians

1. There’s a time to walk and not walk

Even pedestrians can make a difference by obeying the “DON’T WALK” signs, particularly when crossing intersections along major bus routes. That allows vehicles to complete turns and all of the traffic waiting behind them, including buses, to move more efficiently.

 

We’ve shared our tips gearing up for PLDC. Do you have any other suggestions to add? We’d love to hear them. Leave a comment below!