ALERT! : More info
Translink Buzzer Blog

Search: surrey

How roommates on the Customer Information team help keep transit moving during COVID-19

Remote work has become a new norm for many of us in the era of COVID-19. For our Customer Information (CI) team, this meant leaving a small but bustling hive at the North Surrey Office, where real-time alerts are sent out, updates are received, and hundreds of customer questions are answered.

Working from home (WFH) was quite a readjustment for the team in numerous ways. For Michael Robertson and Cam Muirhead, Customer Information Work Leaders, one thing has remained constant – a good daily face-to-face dose of work banter and chuckles with a desk buddy, which, we’re sure, many of us missed so much. The thing is Mike and Cam are roommates!

We of course couldn’t miss the chance of talking to this awesome CI duo about their ‘co-working at home’ experience and how CI worked during these most uncertain times.

Mike and Cam met while working at Coast Mountain Bus company (CMBC – the bus company that’s part of the TransLink enterprise)  in 2013. They’ve always gotten along in-and-outside of the workplace, so when in the end of 2019, Cam was looking for a new place to stay and Mike was in need of a roommate, they decided to team-up for a mutually beneficial living arrangement.

Mike (on the left) and Cam (on the right), customer information work leaders

How was your experience working from home as roommates during COVID-19?

Cam: COVID-19 was first announced as a global pandemic on March 11th. Initially, like everyone else, we couldn’t anticipate what this would entail. Read more »

June 27 marks 130 years of public transit in Metro Vancouver

Laying the line for streetcars at Granville and Robson, Vancouver (Photo: City of Vancouver Archives) 

Metro Vancouver’s first public transit vehicle was an electric streetcar that rolled down Main Street in the City of Vancouver for the first time on June 27, 1890.

That makes June 27, 2020 the 130th anniversary of public transit in Metro Vancouver! Read more »

TransLink boosts availability of sanitizer dispensers

Dispensers to be installed on entire RapidBus fleet, at exchanges, and more stations

Starting next week, TransLink will build on its Safe Operating Action Plan and expand the availability of hand sanitizer dispensers across Metro Vancouver’s transit system. Dispensers will be installed on the entire RapidBus fleet, at key exchanges, and at more SkyTrain stations.

“Since the beginning of the pandemic, we have been focused on our cleaning and sanitizing protocols,” says TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond. “These dispensers will help promote strong personal hygiene practices, which is especially important as our ridership continues to grow. We need to look out for one another and do our part to ensure we are keeping ourselves and our fellow passengers as safe as possible.” Read more »

6 transit-friendly beaches in Metro Vancouver

Each time summer draws near, we’re reminded of thousands of kilometres of British Columbia coastline and countless panoramic destinations to visit. This year might feel different, but it doesn’t mean you should cancel your summer plans!

As the quarantine restrictions ease up, the following months can be a good time for us to safely explore our local communities and enjoy their beaches. Living in Metro Vancouver also means that most of the excellent sunset spots and panoramic destinations are just under an hour away by public transit. We’ve compiled a list of awesome transit-friendly spots for you to check out this summer.

While visiting public outdoor spaces, please don’t forget to maintain at least 2 metres (6 feet) from others. Note lifeguards are not on duty at certain beaches and some facilities may remain close. We advice that you to check the official websites before planning your trips. 

1. White Pine Beach

How to get there: Bus 150

Location: Sasamat Lake, Port Moody

Website

If you want to go for swimming, consider checking out the White Pine Beach on Sasamat Lake. Sasamat Lake is one of the warmest in Greater Vancouver and the beach is located just a few minutes outside of Coquitlam in Belcarra Regional Park. It’s a family-friendly spot that has great walking trails, a beach area and swimming in the lake.

2. White Rock Beach

How to get there: Buses 361, 362

Location: Marine Drive, White Rock

Website

A beautiful gem located just a few kilometres north of the US border and only 35 minutes south of the City of Vancouver, BC. White Rock is known for it’s sandy beaches and stunning sunsets. The 2.5 km long beach promenade, which connects west beach and east beach at the ocean’s side, will offer you a nice stroll.

3. Centennial Beach

How to get there: Bus 619

Location: 541, Centennial Parkway, Delta

Website 

If you live nearby or want to avoid the Vancouver crowds – this is a perfect destination for you! Located in Boundary Bay Regional Park, this spot has sandy beaches, salt marshes, tidal flats and lagoons.

4. Barnet Marine Park

How to get there: Bus 160

Location: 8181 Barnet Road, Burnaby

Website

Barnet Marine Park is located on the Burrard Inlet and offers ocean swimming, walking trails and dog off-leash area. Whether you prefer an early morning walk, or views of the setting sun, this park and beach have something for everyone.

5. Ambleside Park Beach

Note: The beach is undergoing annual clean-up and log removal. Please check the official website for further updates.

How to get there: Buses 250, 253

Location: 1150, Marine Drive, West Vancouver

Website

Ambleside Park Beach offers a stunning view of Stanley Park and Lions Gate Bridge. This is one of the dog-friendly destinations with large off-leash area for dogs that you can visit with your furry friend. Another perk includes a large waterfront walking path that stretches throughout the park.

6. Crescent Beach

How to get there: Buses 351

Location: Sullivan Street, South Surrey
Website

Visit Crescent Beach for a fun day on the seaside! It is a beautiful family-friendly beach and residential area in South Surrey not far from White Rock.  Enjoy swimming, scenic views from the pier and nature trails. Dogs are not allowed along the walkway at Crescent Beach from May 15 to September 15, as per municipal bylaws.

There are many other beaches in Metro Vancouver to visit by transit. Let us know your favourite in comments below!

5 awesome places to visit on a transit daycation

The last few months have been really quiet around town. However, If you keep your ear to the streets, you can hear a few more things .

Compass taps on buses returned at the start of the month, as did the sound of the front doors opening again. On SkyTrain, you can hear the footsteps of people walking 6 feet apart, following the physical distancing decals and going through the designated fare gates. The pitter-patter of people getting on and off trains is a little louder when you give extra space to get off, and in some places, you can even hear the dispensing of hand sanitizer. That’s right, transit is healing and coming back healthier than ever, thanks to TransLink’s Safe Operating Action Plan.

With all that information, and as quarantine restriction ease up with the advancement of BC’s Restart Plan, the world feels anew with opportunities for adventure. Where you haven’t been in forever feels fresh again! So, without further ado, here are some suggestions for a transit-centric “daycation” for all of you eager to safely get around again.

In no particular order:

1. Stanley Park

How to get there: the 19 Bus

You may not be able to drive into Stanley Park just yet, but you can take the 19 bus! Visit Vancouver’s most famous park and soak in some views as you walk along the famous 28-kilometre seawall. Or, Rack and Ride and bring your bike to get around faster! Explore nearly 30 kilometres of trails or make some waves at Second Beach!

2. Gastown Steam Clock

How to get there: Expo Line or Canada Line to Waterfront Station

Just a few minutes from Waterfront Station stands the Gastown Steam Clock. It’s tall, it’s steamy and it’s usually always crowded. But if you’ve never had the chance to take that perfect picture with it for your Instagram, today may be the day. Enjoy your photoshoot and continue your stroll in Gastown or settle down and grab a bite to eat at a nearby restaurant. Be sure to avoid the construction and grab hand sanitizer at the station if you need it!

3. Lynn Canyon Park

How to get there: the 227 bus

Lynn Canyon Park has been one of Metro Vancouver’s premier picnic destinations for over a century! Open to the public since 1912, it’s also the perfect place for a fun hike or quick swim. If that’s not enough for one day, swing on over to the Lynn Canyon suspension bridge and get a thrilling view from above!

4. Tynehead Regional Park

How to get there: the 388 bus

Cross over to the other side of the river and take a nice hike in Surrey’s Tynehead Regional Park. Check out many of the different routes and if you’re not done after walking nearly 5 kilomertres, head on to the overpass and get an up-close, overhead view of Highway 1.

5. Aberdeen Centre

How to get there: Canada Line to Richmond-Brighouse Station

If being outside isn’t your thing, and you’re tired of all the online shopping – make it real at Aberdeen. The shopping centre located in the heart of Richmond is a unique and exciting fusion of East and West and has everything you need for a fun-filled day! Stop by at the 60 feet tall musical fountain and catch shows every hour!

Join us for TransLink’s Annual General Meeting and Open Board Meeting on June 18, 2020

Join us for our virtual Annual General Meeting on Thursday, June 18 from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

You’ll hear from TransLink Board Chair Tony Gugliotta and CEO Kevin Desmond about TransLink’s vision for the future as BC’s economy restarts. Questions from the public for the Board of Directors and CEO may be submitted during the meeting through an interactive, online Q&A platform.

How to join the Annual General Meeting:

Our June Open Board Meeting will follow after a brief break. You can apply to speak as a public delegate by visiting our Board Meeting page.

How to join the Open Board Meeting:

If you’re unable to attend, you can watch recordings of both meetings on our YouTube channel following the event: youtube.com/TransLink

We look forward to seeing you then.

Go By Bike Week: mapping your route and the “slow” streets movement

Cyclists on Hornby Street in Vancouver

While transit ridership is down in most cities around the globe you might have noticed more people out walking, cycling and breathing in the fresh air!

In the latest in our series to support HUB Cycling’s Go By Bike Week, we take a look some of the changes to streets happening locally and around the world, as well as some trip planning tools and recommended routes to make sure you can get around Metro Vancouver actively and safely.

Is it me or have I been seeing lots of people out walking and cycling?

It’s not just you! While active commuting trips and commuting trips of all types have decreased during the pandemic, recreational cycling trips are up significantly in cities like Vancouver (an 85 per cent increase during March).

Similar increases have been seen across the globe — in Beijing, New York and London — as people look to stay active, commute to work were needed, and take important mental health and physical activity breaks.

Parks in B.C. have witnessed a 62 per cent increase in visitations in May while in the Lower Mainland, Metro Vancouver parks are seeing similar activity with a 67 per cent increase to the end of April 2020.

What’s happening to streets around Metro Vancouver and the globe?

Now you might have been hearing terms like “COVID streets,” “summer streets” or “slow streets.” Local, federal and global physical distancing regulations have sparked conversation around reallocating more road, park and sidewalk space for people to walk, cycle, roll, sit and queue safely. With traffic decreasing during the pandemic, that’s meant cities around the world have moved to turn car lanes into active transportation lanes.

Cities such as Vancouver (50km of slow streets), Oakland, California (119km of slow streets), Portland, Oregon (slow/safe streets at 160 locations), Milan (35km of Strade Aperte [open roads]) and Paris (50km converted bike streets and 30 pedestrianized streets) have reacted rapidly to re-allocate space for cars, to people.

Locally, the City of Vancouver has launched its Room to Move, Room to Queue and Room to Load initiative, installing new routes that prioritize walking, cycling and rolling to make it easier for people to exercise and access businesses in their local neighbourhood.

The city has closed the eastbound lanes on Beach Avenue to all vehicles from Stanley Park to Hornby Street, as well as closing Stanley Park to all vehicles (excluding the Stanley Park Causeway/Highway 99).

To find out more about these developing changes visit the city’s temporary road closures and changes during COVID-19 page, have a read of their FAQs on Slow Streets, or email the city directly: slowstreets@vancouver.ca

What are some things to keep in mind when planning my bike trip?

TransLink recommends using routes with dedicated cycling infrastructure separated from motor vehicles, such as bike lanes, as much as possible. To map out your cycling route, there are a few tools we recommend.

1. Visit TransLink’s Cycling Maps page to view several major TransLink-funded cycleways running parallel to SkyTrain routes.

2. Use Google Maps for trip planning and the estimated time it will take you, but please be mindful, particularly beginner cyclists, that Google Maps does not always recommend the safest cycling routes or take new and existing protected infrastructure into account. If you want to make sure you’re accessing cycling routes for all ages and abilities, please check out these other trip planning platforms:

3. Vancouver Bike Route Planner allows you to filter for “bike routes” and “safer” bike routes as well as a full list of SkyTrain stations, Mobi Bike Share stations and elevation gains.

4. Bikemaps.org is a useful mapping tool that also allows you to filter through new cycling infrastructure, collisions reports, hazards and bike thefts.

5. Bike Citizens Vancouver Did you know that nearly half of all trips under 5 km in Metro Vancouver are made by car? Many of these trips for groceries, prescriptions, and other essentials can easily be done by bicycle. In fact, running errands by bike for trips of this distance is often faster and more convenient than driving. Bicycles are one of the most efficient forms of transport so if you want to SEE how far you can go on a city bike, road bike or mountain bike over 5, 10, 15, and 30-minute increments, check out this handy mapping tool. You might be surprised!

What are other cities in Metro Vancouver doing to open streets?

For a full list of temporary streets changes during COVID please visit your municipality’s website for the most recent updates. In the meantime, here are a few that have been confirmed in the Lower Mainland:

New Westminster

  • McInnes Overpass – Closed the northbound vehicle lane to vehicles, opening it to pedestrians and cyclists.
  • Sixth Avenue – reallocated some curbside parking spaces on Sixth Street (near Sixth Avenue) to a place where pedestrians can wait for the traffic lights to change and pass one another on the sidewalk.
  • Central Valley GW – Closing a southbound curb lane on East Columbia Street / North Rd north of Hume Park to motor vehicles to improve conditions for people walking and cycling along the Central Valley Greenway.

City of North Vancouver

  • Grand Boulevard – Converted road space west between Keith and 19th and Grand Boulevard between 19th and 23rd (these routes are also appropriate for commuting traffic to and from Lynn valley to central Lonsdale).
  • Proposed – All local neighbourhood routes with low traffic volumes (St Andrews, 17th, 4th, 27th and Sutherland)
    • Esplanade, Lonsdale with focus at the intersections of 13th, 15th, 17th streets.
    • Existing bike routes that do not facilitate passing with physical distance without taking the vehicle travel lane: 3rd and 15th streets, 1st/2nd Street west of 3rd, East and West Keith, 13th Street.

Maple Ridge

  • Proposed
    • 123 St Avenue between 203 St to Laity St
    • 227 St between Brown Avenue and Abernethy Way

Port Moody

  • Recommended Routes
    • Neighbourhood bike routes: George Street, Glenayre Drive, Glencoe Drive, Ailsa Drive, College Park Way, Washington, Princeton Ave, Harvard Drive, as well as the Shoreline Trail (some portions are one way only).

Richmond

  • Bayview Street – Established temporary walkway in Steveston Village along the south side of (No. 1 Road-Third Avenue) that provides additional space for safe distancing.
  • Garry Point Park – Implemented one-way walking routes in Garry Point Park in
  • Other recommended routes – Railway Greenway, Railway Ave (Granville Ave-Moncton St), Crabapple Ridge Neighbourhood Bike Route, Granville Ave (Railway Ave-Garden City Road), Parkside Neighbourhood Bike Route, Shell Road Trail (Hwy 99 Overpass-Steveston Hwy)
  • Perimeter Dyke Trails: South Dyke, West Dyke, Middle Arm

Surrey

  • Proposed
    • Surrey reports a 40% decrease in traffic volumes and is exploring 7-8 ‘recreational’ cycling routes around the city to connect to civic facilities, parks and close roads around parks to create loops.

UBC

  • Proposed
    • North West Marine Drive

City of Vancouver

  • Stanley Park – close to cars (some exceptions apply)
  • Beach Avenue – Eastbound lane closed to vehicles on Beach Ave (including Park Lane) from Stanley Park to Hornby St.
  • From May 22, Vancouver is added a further 12km of Slow Streets. Visit the website for more information.

Author: James Ranson

Go by Bike Week: what do you need to know about buying an e-bike

Electric bikes have never been more popular than they are now! Interest is e-bikes is booming and for good reason.

More people of different backgrounds and ages and abilities are finding that e-bikes are helping them stay mobile. Whether that’s seniors or people who find conventional biking difficult or impossible or others who just like the technology and don’t mind a little help getting up that last hill.

E-bikes are fun to ride, help to erase hills in our hilly region and can extend the range that the average rider would have considered. Not to mention they’re good for hauling stuff!

The technology has improved by leaps and bounds, improving the quality of manufacturing and bringing the price of entry level e-bikes down to around $2,000 — about one-quarter the annual cost of owning a car.

The diversity of options has rapidly increased, and you’ll find electric options for nearly every flavour of bike – commuter, beach cruiser, folding and cargo bike.

“Electric bicycle” search popularity on Google Trends

What are the electric bike trends for 2020?

Watch this video find how the technology has evolved and what some of the hottest trends are.

What are some of the things you’ll need to keep in mind when you buy an e-bike?

Motor type: the biggest decision you’ll have to make is whether to purchase an electric bike with a hub motor or a mid-drive (or crank) motor. Hub motors sit in the middle of either your front or rear wheel. Mid-drive motors are housed between your pedals on the frame of your bike. Which is better is subject to an ongoing debate as both motor types have distinct pros and cons. To learn more, check out this video by Blue Monkey Bicycles or these motor guides from Bicycling.com, Canberra Electric Bicycles or Electric Bike Report.

Range: how far your battery will last depends on a number of variables, not the least of which are the specs of your e-bike. If you’re hauling cement blocks on a heavy cargo bike, uphill, against the wind, on gravel, in a rainstorm, your battery isn’t likely to last very long. And are you even pedalling? Many e-bikes come with throttle assist, which means no pedalling, but will drain your battery in a flash. To learn more about what affects e-bike range, check out this article by Really Good Ebikes or try your hand at Bosch’s slick range calculator for its mid-drive motors.

Weight: electric bikes come in a diversity of options, with some just a bit heavier than a conventional bike, with others weighing significantly more. When choosing an e-bike, it’s important to consider weight not only for riding, but also for other transport options. If you’re going to use a TransLink bus bike rack, keep in mind there is a 25 kg (55 lb) weight limit – and the battery should be removed. Other carriers also have weight and battery restrictions, including many common bike racks for automobiles, that you’ll want to keep in mind.

With the higher sticker price of e-bikes (hint, check your HUB member benefits for discounts to save a few bucks), always ensure you have access to secure storage. Buy the best lock you can afford (see lock reviews at bikeradar, GearLab, and Wirecutter), and register your bike for free at 529 Garage. Importantly, insurance options for e-bikes are available.

Just get out and try a ride! While buying an e-bike can seem complicated at first with all the technical options, you’ll get a feel for what works through test rides. Just have a clear understanding of how you’ll use the bike, what trade-off you’re willing to make and you’ll be zipping up hills in no time.

Can I convert my conventional bike to an electric?

Yes you can! Two local, popular vendors for conversion kits include EbikeBC and Grin Technologies. There’s also many more vendors online and an extensive DIY community. Just keep in mind that electric bike parts are often expensive and proprietary. Warranty, service, and repair should be top of mind for any purchase – and that goes for buying a used e-bike.

More resources

Reviews: Electric Bike Review has an in-depth guides and videos. Bicycling.com and BikeRadar also offer reviews on a variety of e-bikes.

Buying guides: REI has all the basics on how to choose an electric bike. And electrek’s guide is worth checking out since it’s aimed at first-time purchasers.

Where can I buy an electric bike in Metro Vancouver? Many of your favourite bike retailers will offer electric options alongside conventional models, but there are a retailers that specialize in electric bicycles:

New Bike Parkades open in Coquitlam and Richmond

New Bike Parkades are now open at Burquitlam, Lafarge Lake–Douglas and Bridgeport stations! We’re expanding our Bike Parkade program to new parts of the region, making it an easier for even more people to bike to transit.

You may know us for our bus, SkyTrain, SeaBus, West Coast Express and HandyDART service, but we’re more than just transit. We’re here to support you whether you’re taking transit, walking, cycling or even driving.

On a typical day prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, there were 128,000 bike trips happening across the region. Why are there so many people cycling? Glad you asked!

Not only is cycling a healthy and pollution-free way to get around, it’s also fast! You can travel five times further on bike for the same amount of time and energy expended as walking. Try this tool to see how far you can travel by bike in five minutes!

For most trips under 5 kilometres, which account for 50 per cent of car trips in Metro Vancouver, a bicycle is faster in urban settings.

When you combine cycling with transit, you can travel even faster and further. That’s why we have Bike Parkades at transit hubs throughout the region, allowing you to easily connect to the SkyTrain, West Coast Express, RapidBus and other express bus routes.

Read more »

Helping those helping us: a bus operator doing what he can

Noor Khan has been a bus operator for 13 years. He’s always seen his job as being essential to keeping the region moving but these days he’s seeing, more than ever, just how important his job is, “I will say it’s a critical service because it’s taking those people around who are doing essential services,” said Noor Khan of public transit during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The other day I was driving the 375 bus which goes to a White Rock hospital and there were about 10-12 people on board, and I dropped off two or three nurses at the hospital.” He also dropped off a nurse to a care home on that drive, as well as others working at essential businesses.

Noor works in Surrey, out of Surrey Transit Centre, but never really has the same route – “Surrey usually is interlinked; usually you’re doing different routes, even in the same day.” Even when the routes would change, the buses would be full but for the last few weeks the buses are emptying out to help maintain physical distancing to stay safe on transit amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Every job is like you’re accomplishing something,” said Noor about driving buses for TransLink. “But in this job, you come across people who are really in need of this service – whether they don’t have a car, want to commute for financial and environmental reasons, or are students.”

The safety of his bus is also something Noor is appreciative of. Since the outbreak of COVID-19, TransLink has upped it’s safety measures to keep services clean and workers safe. Buses like Noor drives, for example, are cleaned daily and disinfected weekly.

“You can smell that, driving the bus you are able to smell that it’s been cleaned and properly sanitized,” said Noor.

In addition, TransLink implemented measures such as limited seating and rear-door boarding to better enforce physical distancing.

“Everybody’s conscious enough to not go out there just for fun, when someone is getting a bus, even if you can’t tell, they have some essential work to do,” said Noor.

“When I sit in a bus and drive, I realize there are some people that have important work to do,” said Noor. Khan and the rest of the TransLink staff are there to make sure that essential workers get to where they must be.

 

It’s Sedin Week! Take transit to the Canucks games at Rogers Arena

Dear Daniel and Henrik, THANK YOU! Thank you for 18 years of awesome hockey. Thank you for 18 years of Sedinery on the ice. Thank you for all you’ve down for our community. Thank you for being an inspiration to hockey players and Vancouverites all over. This week, Sedin Week, is your week and an opportunity for all of Metro Vancouver to once again come together to celebrate your amazing careers. Congratulations, Hank and Danny!

To honour the Sedins, the Vancouver Canucks are taking this week’s slate of home games at Rogers Arena to make the most of every opportunity to celebrate them. So, knowing that everyone wants to be there to relive the memories, we’re taking measures such as delaying rail replacement work to accommodate for crowds. Not only that, there are many systems in place to make your trip to celebrate the twins easier. Tap to Pay is one such option; if you don’t have a Compass Card, you can use your Visa, MasterCard or American Express credit cards to pay your transit fare. Just remember, tap your card not your wallet!

Another useful option is Park and Ride. There’s two in Surrey – Scott Road and South Surrey, plus many along the West Coast Express including at Port Coquitlam and Pitt Meadows. You can also use the Park and Ride facility at Carvolth Exchange in Langley, if you’re travelling from there to celebrate the Sedins. Here’s where you can find a full list of Park and Ride facilities, including the cost of parking at each: https://www.translink.ca/Getting-Around/Driving/Park-and-Ride.aspx

Regardless of where you go and how you choose to celebrate Sedin Week, there are lots of options to get there, so figure out the best route, plan a bit ahead, and give yourself some extra travel time – there will be a lot of fans like you wanting to join in on the celebration!

Congrats again, Daniel and Henrik!

I Love Transit 2019: Wrapping up a decade of I Love Transit

2019 was another busy year for TransLink. We celebrated many milestones including 10 years of I Love Transit!

This year’s celebrations included, among other things, a free week of bus rides for K-12 students, an interview with one of our favourite retired bus operators, a chat with one of Metro Vancouver’s favourite Wayfinding experts, contests and so much more!

Read more »

Metro Vancouver transit strike: carsharing and carpooling options

We’re beyond pleased to share that Coast Mountain Bus Company, and Unifor Locals 111 and 2200 have reached a tentative agreement! We’re working towards providing regular schedules for all transit modes.

Evo at Braid Station

The reserved parking stalls for Evo cars at Braid Station.

While the SkyTrain, West Coast Express and HandyDART will continue to operate during the anticipated three-day strike, we recognize it will be a challenge for the our 350,000 customers who rely on bus and SeaBus services each weekday to get around.

That’s why TransLink’s doing what we can by facilitating options so commuters can reach their destination or connect to transit that’s operating regular schedules. It’s our job to keep the region moving. We’ve reached out to our partners to help give some relief. Read more »

Your ultimate 2019 guide to transit trick-or-treating

Your ultimate 2019 guide to transit trick-or-treating

You and your kiddo have planned for this day for weeks, months or even years! And now the only thing standing in the way of your epic superhero Halloween costume being unrecognizable, hidden under three layers of fleece and a raincoat, is Metro Vancouver’s unpredictably predictable rainy weather. Read more »

Wordless Wednesday : #MyTransLink – October 16

Read more »