ALERT! : More info
Translink Buzzer Blog

Ask TransLink: join Mary Riemer for a Facebook chat at 2pm today, Thu May 9, 2013!

asktranslink

From April 15 to May 10, you can Ask TransLink! We’re spotlighting one TransLink staff member every week and inviting you to ask them questions about their work. Find out all about the series.

Mary Riemer, transit planner!

Mary Riemer, transit planner!

All right: for our final week of Ask TransLink, we’re heading to Facebook to do a live chat with Mary Riemer, transit planner!

Join us at 2 p.m. today, May 9, 2013, at TransLink’s Facebook page: we’ll launch a post and reply to as many questions as we can for an hour.

If you’re curious, here’s more about Mary from earlier this week. Hope to see you there!

Edit: we did it! Check out the full Facebook post here!

Heads up: Commercial-Broadway elevator and escalator outage, Sat May 11, 2013

The sign at Commercial-Broadway Station

The sign at Commercial-Broadway Station

Heads up: there are some elevator/escalator outages at Commercial-Broadway this Saturday, May 11, 2013. The details:

All elevators and escalators on the Commercial side (to platforms 1 & 2) of Commercial-Broadway Station will be out of service on Saturday, May 11, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. due to BC Hydro maintenance work in the area. Elevators and escalators on the Broadway side (to platforms 3 & 4) of the station are expected to remain operational. Customers who require assistance should request help using the red emergency phone or from a SkyTrain Attendant.

Please share with anyone who might be affected!

Ask TransLink: Mary Riemer, transit planner!

asktranslink

From April 15 to May 10, you can Ask TransLink! We’re spotlighting one TransLink staff member every week and inviting you to ask them questions about their work. Find out all about the series.

Mary Riemer, TransLink transit planner!

Mary Riemer, TransLink transit planner!

We’re super excited to welcome transit planner Mary Riemer to the blog!

Mary will be kindly taking time to answer all your questions this week, all the way until Friday, May 10, 2013 at noon. And she’ll do a special 1 hour Facebook live chat on Thursday, May 9, at 2 p.m.!

We asked Mary a couple of questions about her work to kick it off: here we go!

Hi Mary! What kind of work do you do for TransLink?

Hello! I am an Assistant Transit Planner in TransLink’s Service Planning team. I’ve been with the agency for just over a year, supporting both the Area Transit Planning and Network Management programs. Service Planning works with our operating companies to make sure the transit network is developing in a way that will help meet the region’s long-term goals and objectives. This involves continuous analysis of how people use the various services available to them and based on those findings, making adjustments to improve both the efficiency and usefulness of the network.

What projects are you currently working on?

I’m working on a lot of exciting projects! The Northeast Sector Area Transit Plan has just kicked off and will establish a long-term vision for the transit network in the communities of Anmore, Belcarra, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody, as well as identify a range of near-term transit priorities to begin the realization of that vision.

Service Optimization
is another part of what we do in Service Planning. These projects aim to put service where it is needed most and better match supply and demand, helping TransLink generate revenues to support efficient transit service across the region. One of the most important aspects of Service Optimization is consultation with the public. In the fall, we received invaluable feedback on proposed changes that helped us understand potential impacts and, in several cases, refine the projects to help mitigate these.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

I love my job! One of the best parts of my work is talking to the public about their thoughts and ideas. So I’m excited to answer your questions about Service Planning and hear what you love about transit in Metro Vancouver too.

Thanks Mary!

All right everyone – now it’s your turn! Submit your questions in the comments below, and we’ll get Mary to answer them for you until Friday, May 10, 2013 at noon!

Ask TransLink: Brian Revel, bus operator

asktranslink

From April 15 to May 10, you can Ask TransLink! We’re spotlighting one TransLink staff member every week and inviting you to ask them questions about their work. Find out all about the series.

Brian Revel, bus operator!

Brian Revel, bus operator!

We’re super happy to welcome Brian Revel, bus operator, to the blog!

This week, Brian will be answering your questions from the road, stopping to check-in between his shifts on the 25 and 41 routes every day! (It’s true: feel free to say hi if you see him on your route!)

We’ll be taking questions for Brian until Friday, April 26, 2013 at noon. To kick things off, we asked him a few questions about his work driving buses for Coast Mountain Bus Company. Let’s go!

When did you start working as an operator with Coast Mountain Bus Company?

I began training with CMBC in November of 2007. I went “live” in January 2008. I have been a transit operator now for just under five-and-a-half years. Before that, I owned my own VIP touring company, à la carte specialty tours but I had to close the business because most of my clientele were Americans who suffered massive losses during the financial collapse in 2007. Prior to owning my own business, I drove tour coach for Gray Line of Vancouver.

What has the experience been like? What keeps you driving buses?

The experience has been a really positive one. I have been a life-long transit user and now that I’m on the ‘inside’ I have learned what it is to be on the other side of the red line. There was so much I didn’t know, so much I didn’t understand, about public transport before coming to CMBC. Apart from the technical side, I am truly impressed and honoured to know and work with such an incredible group of dedicated professionals throughout the entire Translink family.

What keeps me driving buses? I’m not too sure, to be honest. It kinda gets into your blood. There’s nothing like a corner office where the view always changes. Another thing about this job is that it’s the indoor-iest outdoor job around… or is it the outdoor-iest indoor job? Besides, I’m a people person and so my interactions with passengers and other folk throughout my day keeps me going. And hey- if you love your job, you never work a day in your life.

What routes have you driven? What are you driving now?

I work out of the Vancouver depot so I have only worked the routes that VTC services. The 26, 27, 28 and 29 as well as the express services are serviced by the Burnaby depot and most days the 49, as well as the 480 are serviced out of Richmond. Apart from these routes, I have driven every route in Vancouver.

Currently, I am driving on the #25 in the morning and the #41 in the afternoon.

I understand you’ve received commendations in the past: what have they been for?

You’d be surprised. It’s the little things that matter most, I guess. They are mostly for being friendly, giving information, greeting people when they get on the bus, calling out the stops. Stuff like that.

Is there anything else you would like to add?

I have a little campaign I do on my bus about once a month… it’s called, Say Hi on the Bus which made 24Hrs. I was interviewed for Career Trek – here’s the video. And I have competed in the Bus Roadeo and have placed 1st for VTC each time, this year placing 4th overall!

Thanks Brian!

Okay you guys – over to you! Please feel free to submit your questions in the comments below, and we’ll get Brian to answer them for you until Friday, April 26, 2013 at noon!

Ask TransLink: our roads engineer Q&A helps move a sign, talks BC Parkway upgrades, and more

asktranslink

From April 15 to May 10, you can Ask TransLink! We’re spotlighting one TransLink staff member every week and inviting you to ask them questions about their work. Find out all about the series.

Peggy Gibbs, TransLink roads engineer!

Peggy Gibbs, TransLink roads engineer!

Roads engineer Peggy Gibbs will be wrapping up her Q&A on the blog at noon today, Friday April 19, 2013 – but just before she goes, here’s some of the highlights from her discussion this week!

We moved a sign blocking a cycling path in Richmond

Caption and photo from Voony’s blog: Sign on Knight bridge, at Mitchell Island interchange, resting in the middle of the pathway, also advertised as a bike lane.

Voony wrote in asking whether this construction sign on Mitchell Island belonged to us, as it was blocking the bike path he uses.

Peggy looked into it, and it got removed! Here’s what she wrote:

The temporary sign appears to be from the City of Richmond’s contractor, and we contacted the City to direct their contractor to relocate it out of the paved path. The sign has now been removed by the City’s contractor.

Read more »

Ask TransLink: join Peggy Gibbs on Facebook for a real-time chat at 2pm, Thu April 18, 2013

asktranslink

From April 15 to May 10, you can Ask TransLink! We’re spotlighting one TransLink staff member every week and inviting you to ask them questions about their work. Find out all about the series.

Join us on the TransLink Facebook page for a real-time chat with Peggy Gibbs today!

Join us on the TransLink Facebook page for a real-time chat with Peggy Gibbs today!

Heads up: for our first week of Ask TransLink, we’re going to try out a Facebook live chat with Peggy Gibbs, roads engineer at TransLink! Here’s a bit more about Peggy from earlier this week.

Join us at 2 p.m. today, April 18, 2013, at TransLink’s Facebook page: we’ll start up a post and answer as many questions as we can for an hour. Hope to see you there!

Edit: we did it! Check out the Facebook chat here, and thanks to everyone who asked questions!

Ask TransLink: Peggy Gibbs, roads engineer!

asktranslink

From April 15 to May 10, you can Ask TransLink! We’re spotlighting one TransLink staff member every week and inviting you to ask them questions about their work. Find out all about the series.

Peggy Gibbs, a roads engineer at TransLink

Peggy Gibbs, a roads engineer at TransLink

Please extend a warm welcome to Peggy Gibbs, who works as an engineer with TransLink’s Roads department—helping manage our bridges, the major road network, and more! (Here’s a Buzzer blog post about our roads and bridges, btw!)

Peggy has kindly agreed to take your questions this week, ending at Friday, April 19, 2013 at noon. To get us started, I’ve asked her to tell us a bit about her work. Here we go!

What kind of work do you do for TransLink?

I am a Project Manager at TransLink, and have been with TransLink’s Roads Department for about two-and-a-half years.

The Roads Department here at TransLink has 11 engineers, and we look after the interests of all road user. We have a responsibility to help TransLink achieve its 2040 goal of having most trips by transit, walking, and cycling.

We operate (or help to operate) a range of infrastructure, from the region’s Major Road Network (MRN), to the BC Parkway pedestrian/cyclist path running from Vancouver to Surrey, to the five TransLink-owned bridges. We also look after the interests of truck traffic.

What projects are you currently working on, and what projects have you done in the past?

We have lots of projects on the go. Some of the ones we are working on now include the Evergreen Line integration, working with the Evergreen Line project team to make sure that buses, pedestrians, bikes, and autos can easily and safely access the new Evergreen Line stations. We are working on a multi-year project to upgrade the BC Parkway bike/pedestrian path, which hasn’t had an upgrade in the 27 years since it opened.

We work with all the municipalities in the Metro Vancouver area to fund maintenance, operation, and upgrades to the Major Road Network and cycling facilities. We are part of the TransLink team that works with municipalities and developers throughout the Metro Vancouver area to improve and integrate bus exchanges as town centres and neighborhoods are redesigned and redeveloped.

Can you describe the work of a road engineer? i.e.: what’s your day-to-day work like?

Road engineers at TransLink deal with everything from maintaining bridge structures to making sure traffic (including buses, bikes, and pedestrians) can operate safely and efficiently on a region-wide network spanning Metro Vancouver’s 22 municipalities.

To do that, we have a range of programs such as regular bridge inspections, MRN pavement inspections, and funding programs for roads and bicycle infrastructure. We also work with TransLink planners and municipal planners to make sure that new and existing TransLink services and facilities, such as bus routes and bus exchanges, can operate safely and efficiently.

On a day-to-day basis, that means things like (for example) working with staff at municipalities, the Ministry of Transportation, and developers when they are making changes to roadways, traffic signals, parking regulations, or sidewalks; making sure that roadway designers give buses enough space to pull in and out of bus stops and to turn; and working with Coast Mountain Bus Company to make bus exchanges easier for visually impaired persons to use.

And now it’s your turn to ask the questions!

Please feel free to submit your questions in the comments below, and we’ll get Peggy to answer them for you until Friday, April 19, 2013 at noon!

Ask TransLink: welcome to our April special post series!

asktranslink

Each month during 2013, we’re exploring a special topic in the Buzzer newsletter and blog. And for April/May, we’re encouraging you to Ask TransLink!

Ask four TransLink staff members about their work!

From April 15 to May 10, we’ll spotlight one TransLink staff member every week and invite you to ask them questions about their work. Here’s our schedule of fantastic colleagues:

We think this is going to be a lot of fun and really informative for everyone!

How do you ask questions?

Here’s how the series will run:

  • At the start of the week, we’ll put up a post introducing each staff member.
  • You can feel free to ask questions in the comments of that post throughout the week, and we’ll get answers for you twice daily.
  • On Thursdays, we’ll do something special if we can: a real-time chat on Facebook or another venue!
  • And question time will wrap up on Fridays by noon.

And here’s some sample questions to get your wheels turning!

  • How do you become a transit planner?
  • Why is TransLink in charge of some roads and bridges and not others?
  • What is the last project you worked on? What did you get to do?
  • What’s your favourite bus route to drive? To plan?

Things to keep in mind

Let’s go over a few key items to ensure we’re all on the same page—especially if you’ve never commented on the Buzzer blog before!

  • Remember to follow our participation guidelines when asking questions or making comments!
  • You can ask anything related to the scope of the staff member’s work, as long as it follows our participation guidelines. We’ll do our best to answer as much as we can!
  • Owing to limited time availability, we might not be able to get to every question—our staff do have their regular jobs to get back to! We hope you can understand.
  • And last: let’s have fun! We’ve had so many great conversations on the blog over the years—so let’s keep that up and have a good time together :)

Suggestions welcome!

As always, we’d love your feedback to help inform our series! Write to us in the comments, or feel free to write to thebuzzer@translink.ca.

We’re also thinking of doing Ask TransLink again this year, so we’d also love to know who you would like to speak to in our organization. We’ll see what we can do :)

Life on transit: fantastic tips and tricks for transit from riders like you!

translinklifeontransit

For March/April 2013, we’re spotlighting Life on Transit—observing and illuminating the quirks and habits of daily transit rides around our region!

tipspollresults

We asked you last week if you had any special tips or tools for taking transit—and after 51 votes, 76 per cent of poll takers said they did!

Now to the juicy stuff! We received some fantastic comments with some very hot tips and tricks for transit. One of my favourites came from Cliff:

During the PM peak, board an inbound SkyTrain, then stay on it as it becomes an outbound one. This allows you to secure a seat. Particularly useful if your trip is going to be a long one. For example, Commercial to VCC-Clark or even Stadium to Waterfront.

Crowded bus stop along a crowded route? Reduce your chances of being passed up by walking to the previous stop. Drivers are more likely to pick up a single person at a stop than if there were a crowd.

Picking up or dropping someone off at the airport? Use Templeton Station to do this. Canada Line between YVR and Templeton is free. You don’t have to pay for parking (you can’t park at the station) and you don’t have to worry about timing your arrival so you get there at the exact moment as the person you’re picking up.

Here is Allen with a tip for 49 riders:

Route 49 users: Use the Next Bus feature and Map View. Click on the bus icons. The ones with a bus number in the 8000s is an articulated bus. Time your trip so you get on to an articulated bus for a less cramped/more enjoyable ride.

And here’s JT with some great tips for the 620:

For those who take the 620 Tsawwassen Ferry, I always like to arrive 20-30 mins ahead of the printed departures in the schedule or website, because all too often (especially on Fridays, long and ordinary weekends, and holidays) RTC and Transit supervisors will dispatch an extra express bus that isn’t scheduled to help out with peak demands, especially with trips connecting to sailings for both Victoria and Nanaimo. An example is if you need to make the 3pm sailing to Victoria, or 3:15pm sailing to Nanaimo, the printed schedule says 2pm leaving Bridgeport, and an extra trip around 1:45pm on weekends. About 80-90% of the time, theres an unscheduled trip that leaves Bridgeport sometime just after 1:30pm, and it will be an express trip with no stops, arriving at the terminal sometime around 2:10pm, plenty of time at the terminal. However, if you don’t like a crowded bus, stick with the printed departures, those trips tend to be a much lighter load, arriving only 10 mins after the first trip, and still time to catch your ferry.

Carmen had a great tip for busy bus routes:

One particular bus stop I frequent *can* be pretty packed if arriving at certain times of the day (it’s near a couple schools). If this is the case, I’ve found that the bus takes SO long to load that it’s actually *faster* to wait for the next one, which usually ends up leapfrogging past the first bus (because it takes a long time to unload at each stop as well) and arriving at my final destination on time, if not early.

And to finish it up, Kerry had some fabulous advice for travelling with kids!

I have two young children, and transit is our usual method of getting around (we use a co-op car every now and again). My tips for easier transit riding with kids: allow plenty of time to travel so we’re not rushing around in a sweat, and instead can enjoy our day. Sit away from wires and buttons so we’re not constantly ringing the bell to stop the bus (I’ve seen this a few times!). The best seats on the bus for me are at the back, where my older son can sit by the window and look out, and the younger is away from the pull-wire and entertained by the view out the back window. In particular, keeping away from the wheelchair button at the front of the bus and the emergency button by the door seat on the older skytrains. I also use a carrier instead of a stroller; then my youngest son doesn’t take up any space, we can sit where we like, and I can even stand for seniors or wheelchair users.

Other tips: sing songs (not loudly!) – this has gotten me out of trouble on longer journeys soooo many times. And being polite and friendly to the bus driver/transit staff/other passengers is fun! We have made lots of friends on transit over the years. My boys have collected pins, pushed the button to sound the horn on the skytrain at Waterfront (so awesome!), gotten a free “ticket” on the bus (the driver prints a blank). I feel confident that in the years to come, my kids will be able to navigate transit in Vancouver safely and effectively on their own.

Now there are many, many more tips over at the original post—I highly encourage you to go over and have a read! Thanks to everyone who so kindly submitted their suggestions!

Heads up: transit service changes start Monday, April 15, 2013

The 99 B-Line on Main!

The 99 B-Line on Main!

Look out: our seasonal transit service changes are starting on Monday, April 15, 2013!

Our seasonal changes happen four times a year in April, June, September, and December to reflect changes in passenger demand, and ensure services are efficient.

Make sure to read the the full list of changes here, but route changes of note include:

  • 620 Tsawwassen Ferry/Bridgeport Station: to accommodate the seasonal increase in demand, capacity for the route will be increased. From April 15 until September 2 (Labour Day), between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m., two 620 buses every hour (up from one per hour), will leave the Tsawwassen ferry terminal and Bridgeport Station. All 620 buses will be articulated.
  • SeaBus: More SeaBus service on Sundays and holidays to reflect increased demand. Starting May 19, until September 2, 2013, the SeaBus will operate every 15 minutes (up from every 30 minutes) between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
  • 150 White Pine Beach/Coquitlam Station: Beginning May 4, service to White Pine Beach resumes Saturdays, Sundays and holidays until Labour Day. Weekday (Monday to Friday) service will operate between June 10 and August 30.
  • C26 Buntzen Lake Special/Coquitlam Station Special: Beginning June 15, service will resume to Buntzen Lake with trips operating on weekends and holidays until Labour Day.
  • Routes with a seasonal decrease in demand will also see a decrease in frequency for the summer months, returning to higher frequencies in fall. That includes routes serving post-secondary institutions, who have less busy summer months, like the 9, 130, and 143.

Owing to construction, there will also be some temporary changes for the 4 route too. Here’s the reroute map, and the description of the changes:

  • 4 Powell/Downtown: From April 15 until further notice, a shuttle service will operate between Waterfront Station and the Eton/ Renfrew Street terminus. Customers traveling east will transfer from #4 Downtown at Cordova and Seymour to the #4 Powell. Customers from the east (Powell) traveling west will transfer from the #4 Downtown to the #4 UBC at Cordova and Seymour. This shuttle service will operate every 15 minutes and less frequent in the evening.
  • 4 UBC/Downtown: From April 15 until further notice, a shuttle service will operate between Waterfront Station and UBC. Customers traveling west will transfer from #4 Downtown at Cordova and Seymour to the #4 UBC. Customers from the east (Powell) traveling west will transfer from the #4 Powell to the #4 UBC at Cordova and Seymour. Shuttle service will operate every 15 minutes and less frequent in the evening.

For more information…

To learn more about the April service changes:

Share this with anyone you know who might be affected, and have a great transit trip!

Life on transit interview: the authors behind the TransLinked tumblr

translinklifeontransit

For March/April 2013, we’re spotlighting Life on Transit—observing and illuminating the quirks and habits of daily transit rides around our region!

There’s a little blog called TransLinked out there, which spotlights interesting things related to transit — a photo series of people coming through turnstiles, the lovely interiors of past buses, and more.

Well, TransLinked is run mainly by three Vancouver transit riders—Karen Fung, Richard Eriksson, and Jason Vanderhill—and as it’s about keen observations of public transport, I thought they would be perfect to interview for the Life on Transit series. So here they are on TransLinked, its aesthetic, and their own riding experiences. Read on for more!

Can you tell us a bit about TransLinked? How did it get started?

Karen: If my memory serves correctly, Richard and I were talking about transit, which was happening a lot in 2008 as I was working on my thesis about Toronto Transit Camp and was fresh from helping convene the first Vancouver Transit Camp in December 2007. I stumbled upon the name. We wanted to try Tumblr as a platform and, at the time, we noticed people using it in interesting visual ways analogous to the way Twitter was being used in interesting textual ways. I wrote up our very well-hidden manifesto in 2009 a month or two after we started. We’ve been at it ever since!

Jason: I was first invited to join TransLinked as a contributor by Karen in May of 2010, but I don’t think I actually began contributing until about 3 months later when I started my own Tumblr meme, Illustrated Vancouver. I was a very occasional contributor at first, but by 2011, I began spamming the site in earnest!

Wires at Broadway and Main, posted at TransLinked.

Read more »

Spotlighted in 24 Hours!

Look, it's Jhen in 24 Hours!

Look, it’s Jhen in 24 Hours!

I clean forgot to mention that TransLink’s social media work was spotlighted in 24 Hours newspaper last Friday, April 5, 2013!

Check out the article here: I got to speak on behalf of the TransLink social media team and its fantastic work. Especially our Twitter account, which now tops 30,000 followers!

Life on transit poll: what are your best tips, tricks, and tools for transit?

translinklifeontransit

For March/April 2013, we’re spotlighting Life on Transit—observing and illuminating the quirks and habits of daily transit rides around our region!

What are your best tips and tools for transit? Do you have a great mobile app that helps you get around?

What are your best tips and tools for transit? Do you have a great mobile app that helps you get around?

When you ride transit a lot, you just start figuring out ways to make your ride better. Maybe you begin aiming for a certain seat on the bus, or you use a certain transit app to buzz you when your bus is almost there. Or you start to rely on a great podcast to help pass the time!

And this is where we ask you to SPILL THE BEANS! If you’ve got any tips, tricks, or tools that help you have a better transit ride — do your fellow transit riders a solid and let us know!

I’ll go first: for me, apps on my mobile phone are a lifesaver. To wit:

  • I use TransLink’s mobile site to help me quickly see where the next bus is. And sometimes, I’ll use it for a list of a route’s bus stops when I’m not sure which stop I need to exit at.
  • I zoom into Google Maps to figure out the best walking route to the nearest bus stop in an unfamiliar part of town.
  • I use the Kindle app to read books on longer journeys!

I also take the 99 a lot, and I always board in the back: faster rider flow!

Now it’s your turn! Take the poll and tell us in the comments: what helps you out on transit?

Got any tips, tricks or tools that help make your transit ride easier?

  • Yes! I'm the tricksiest. (76%, 39 Votes)
  • Nope: I don't think that hard about it! (24%, 12 Votes)

Total Voters: 51

Good Friday and Easter Monday transit service for 2013

The West Coast Express will not be running on Friday, March 29, but will be back on Monday April 1, 2013.

The West Coast Express will not be running on Friday, March 29, but will be back on Monday April 1, 2013.

Just a reminder that for Good Friday, March 29, 2013, all transit will be on a Sunday schedule, and West Coast Express and AirCare Inspection Centres will not be in operation.

But on Easter Monday, April 1, 2013, we’re back to (mostly) regular service and fares. Please note West Coast Express will only run trains 1, 3 and 5, while TrainBus will operate its regular weekday schedule.

Remember, on Sundays and holidays, you can pay a single-zone fare to travel in all zones all day! As well, those with an adult FareCard, West Coast Express 28-Day Pass, or Annual Employer Transit Pass can take five children, or one adult and four children, on transit with them for free.

For transit service info, feel free to reach out to our call centre on Twitter (twitter.com/translink) or at 604-953-3333!

Life on transit: talk Buzzer history in a Google Hangout today, March 27, 2013!

translinklifeontransit

For March/April 2013, we’re spotlighting Life on Transit—observing and illuminating the quirks and habits of daily transit rides around our region!

Update: our Google Hangout has wrapped and here’s the video above!

As we mentioned last week: today we’re talking about The Buzzer, our 96 year old transit newsletter!

Join us for a Google Hangout today for a video chat. The details:

  • Date and time: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 – noon to 1pm!
  • Where: Online! The Hangout can be viewed on our Google+ profile page. You don’t need a Google+ account to watch the stream!
  • Who: Jhenifer Pabillano and Robert Willis, Buzzer editors!
  • What: All about the history of the Buzzer, plus answers to any questions you might have.
  • Be aware that this is our first Hangout, so it won’t be perfect, though we’ll do our best!

We’ll post the Hangout here as it happens! Check back at noon or later today and you can see exactly how it all went down :)