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Translink Buzzer Blog

Added service for the Honda Celebration of Light!

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Canada’s fireworks show – August 1, 2015 (Courtesy of GoToVan)

Summer means festivals, getting outdoors more and fireworks!

We are so lucky to be treated to the Honda Celebration of Light again this year!composite_14690452769840

Here are the dates for these sparkling displays:

Saturday, July 23 – Netherlands

Wednesday, July 27 – Australia

Saturday July 30 – U.S. A. (DISNEY!!)

All shows begin at 10 p.m.

To make sure everyone can get to and from these spectacular events, TransLink has added more service for all three nights to accommodate the fireworks at English Bay.

Added service

West Vancouver Transit

West Vancouver Transit will operate additional service go to and from Downtown Vancouver before and after each event. There will be additional 255 Service to Lynn Valley from Dundarave.

SkyTrain Expo/Millennium/Canada Lines will run additional trains beginning mid-afternoon, at near-peak service levels lasting well past the end of the events.

Expo Line: Last train will leave Waterfront for King George at 1:16am, with connections to the Millennium Line at Commercial-Broadway.

Millennium Line: Last train to Lougheed will leave Waterfront Station at 1:11am

Canada Line: Last train will leave Waterfront for Richmond-Brighouse at 1:15am

West Coast Express: WCE will offer a special train on July 30 only, leaving Mission City at 7 p.m., arriving at Waterfront Station at 8:15pm The return train departs Waterfront Station at midnight, arriving back at Mission City approximately 1:15am.

SeaBus will provide extra and extended service for each of the Celebration of Light events.

  • July 23, 27 and 30: We’re extending our 15-minute service until 12 a.m., and then every 30 minutes until the last sailing at 1:22 a.m. from the South Terminal.

Some downtown and West End buses are also re-routing during these times. Full details can be found online here.

Station access

Before, during and after the events, transit stations will be open, but some will have modified access to ensure customer comfort and safety.

Waterfront Station: After 10:30 p.m., Expo and Millennium line customers who do not require an elevator may only access the station from the Howe Street entrance, north of Cordova. All Canada Line and SeaBus customers, and Expo and Millennium line customers who need an elevator, can access Waterfront Station through the Cordova Street entrance. The Canada Line Granville and Hastings entrance will remain fully accessible for Canada Line customers.

Granville Station: Customers can enter the station from Dunsmuir Street only after 10:30 p.m. until crowds have cleared. Also, there will be no access to Expo and Millennium trains heading towards Waterfront Station after this time.

Burrard Station: Bikes cannot be locked at the station entrance from 9 p.m. and should be removed by 10:30 p.m. onwards, until the expected crowds have cleared. Customers will not be able to access Expo and Millennium trains towards Waterfront Station after 10:30 p.m.

**Passengers will not be permitted to board SkyTrain
with bikes after the events until crowds are clear**

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Transit Tip!

Don’t wait in line at Compass vending machines after the fireworks!

You can buy your two Compass Tickets (save one for later that night) and top up your Compass Card beforehand to breeze through the crowds after the events!

For up-to-date transit service information including bus re-routes during special events, sign up for Transit Alerts at translink.ca/alerts,
follow @TransLink or call Customer Service at 604.953.3333.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Rogers and Fido customers you are now connected at downtown Expo Line stations

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From left to right: Derrick Cheung, Vice-President Strategic Sourcing and Real Estate, Translink; Gord Nelson, Vice-President, Sales, British Columbia, Rogers Communications; Leon Leroux, Director, Network Implementation, Western Region, Rogers Communications; and Guy Akester, Director, Real Estate Program and Partners, Translink.

Exciting news! Today, Rogers announced it has turned on LTE wireless service in the SkyTrain Dunsmuir Tunnel.

TransLink has partnered with Rogers to provide strong LTE connectivity while on the SkyTrain and – the best part is this service improvement is being made with no cost to taxpayers.

Now, Rogers and Fido customers can surf the web, make/receive calls or texts, stream video and music and catch Pokemon all while travelling through the Dunsmuir Tunnel; including Stadium–Chinatown, Granville, Burrard and Waterfront stations.

Here are all the details on the enhanced connectivity on the SkyTrain!

How do you get wireless service in a tunnel?

This type of install is referred to as a DAS or a Distributed Antenna System. Rogers worked tirelessly over many nights to install equipment in the stations and throughout the Dunsmuir Tunnel.

Non-revenue night work was necessary to ensure passenger service would not be disrupted in any way.  SkyTrain staff also provided great support during this installation.

What are the benefits?

Increased access to cellular data and connectivity is important to our customers!

TransLink has engaged industry experts to ensure that we have a reliable and sustainable network in place.

Rogers and Fido customers now have uninterrupted LTE connectivity while travelling along the Dunsmuir tunnel and can browse the web and make calls.  This improves the safety, security and convenience and is part of our continued effort to improve customer experience.

Are there any plans to expand LTE service to other areas or other carriers?

We are finding innovative ways to expand and diversify revenue sources while delivering a service that customers have requested.

Rogers will continue to expand LTE service along the SkyTrain, specifically, the Edmonds, Columbia, New Westminster and Evergreen tunnels. The DAS system has been configured to support additional carriers so we look forward to other carriers also taking advantage of this opportunity to improve LTE connectivity to the public.

Is LTE the same as Wi-Fi?

The two major categories of wireless internet access for mobile devices are cellular wide area networks and Wi-Fi local area networks.

The biggest difference and reason why we are pursuing cellular access is that Wi-Fi is tied to a router and has a limited range to a confined area, approximately 50 to 100 feet, whereas a cellular network provides access anywhere, through your data plan when you’re out of Wi-Fi range.

Thank you to Lea Dam, Real Estate Project Manager for the low down on the new connectivity!

For more information, check out this news release.

Author: Jessica Hewitt

Boundary Bay Airshow flies into Delta this weekend

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What’s that in the sky? It’s a bird… it’s  a plane… it’s… oh, yep! It’s definitely a plane!

Many, many planes will be making neck-tilting appearances at the Boundary Bay Airshow this Saturday, July 23!

Some of those include a Lockheed P-38L Lightning, a Nakajima KI-43 Oscar and a Harvard Mk 4 and Mk IIb and more!

Due to this high-flying fun, various road closures will take effect from 10:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. in areas surrounding the Boundary Bay Airport in Delta.

Closures and bus detours

  • Street closures will occur on 64th Street at 36th Avenue for eastbound traffic to 72nd Street, allowing only local traffic. Visitors to the Kings Links Golf Course will also be permitted to proceed. Traffic control personnel will be stationed at this closure.
  • 72nd Street at the 3900 Block will be closed for north bound traffic. Barricades will also be placed at this location not allowing traffic to proceed beyond this point. Traffic control personnel will also be stationed at this closure.
  • Closures will also occur at 72nd Street at Churchill Street with traffic only allowed to proceed eastbound on Churchill Street from this point to the event.
  • 80th Street will not be affected by any closures as this is an access route to the event.

Bus service on route 76 will be detoured from 10:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

For up-to-date transit service information visit translink.ca/alerts, follow @TransLink or call Customer Service at 604.953.3333.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Station upgrade news from Joyce–Collingwood

Joyce

Rendering of what the station will look like when the upgrades project is complete

As you may well know, upgrades to Joyce–Collingwood Station are underway!

The upgrades will improve accessibility, capacity, safety and security at the fourth busiest Expo Line Station outside of Downtown Vancouver.

Project benefits

  • New elevator and up and down escalators in the east stationhouse
  • Improved station design with better lighting and visibility
  • Better integration with the community for easier SkyTrain connections

Project update

  • The majority of ground-level demolition work is now complete.
  • Installation of concrete columns and footings to support the new east stationhouse is ongoing.
  • Painting work has begun.

Upcoming work

On July 24, 2016, construction crews are switching out the power source at the station. During this time, several bus stops will be relocated from 5:30 p.m. to end of service to in order to give crews the space they need to work. Signs will be installed at the bus loop to direct customers to their stop. Escalators and elevators will also be out of service during this time.

Below is a summary of what customers can expect at the station over the coming months:

  • The east entrance will remain closed until upgrades are complete in fall 2017, when the project is expected to be complete.
  • Steel and roofing work is expected to begin later this summer.
  • Noise associated with large construction projects, including nighttime work with varying levels of noise while trains are not operating will continue.

Thank you for your patience as we complete these much-needed upgrades to the Joyce–Collingwood Station and stay tuned for additional updates throughout the project.

Contact Us

Have questions? We’re here to listen!

Customer Information: 604.953.3333
Monday to Friday: 5:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday: 6:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Overnight Station Upgrade Customer Service: 1.866.979.0930
Monday to Friday: 12:30 a.m. to 5:30 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday: 11:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

For more information visit:
translink.ca/joyce

Author: Jennifer Morland

CMBC defusers provide emotional first aid to bus operators

Video from the Vancouver Sun

A “defuser” may sound like an electronic device but in the context of Coast Mountain Bus Company, it means something much more personal and important.

A CMBC defuser provides what they like to call “emotional first aid” to employees out on the road; they help operators better cope with serious incidents. .

When the volunteers of this program are called, it’s because a driver is in need of help due to a major accident, a passenger assault or even a death.

The internationally accredited program began in 1992 and is very similar to the same resources extended to police and fire service employees after a traumatic event.

Statistics show that people who get “defusing” shortly after an incident have a much better recovery rate.

Dave McKay has been in this vital support position for 15 years and now acts as the program’s coordinator. He says they try and get a defuser out to an operator in need within hours of an incident.

“Right now we have 23 defusers. We like to have anywhere between 25 and 30. We have eight more on the way!”

All defusers are volunteers and initially were only operators but now the positions are open transit employees, including some former mental health workers.

McKay says a defuser needs empathy, listening and people skills and be able to do well in a crisis. The incidents can be very traumatic for operators and defusers are on call during all service hours.

“In these stressful situations we make sure they don’t drive, bring them to a quiet place then we take them through a defusing process which includes international critical stress management.”

And it’s not only the operators that need some support. Due to its stressful nature, all defusers have sessions themselves after responding to 10 incidents.

A defuser may not be a well-known position outside of CMBC but it is a job that makes such a difference in the lives of operators and employees and helps us keep you moving across the transit network.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Celebrating 1 Million active Compass Cards! #Compass1million

TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond and some other familiar faces celebrating!

TransLink CEO Kevin Desmond and some other familiar faces celebrating!

One million active Compass Cards are being used on our transit system.

One. Million. Wowza!

So, who is using a Compass Card? (spoiler alert – YOU ARE!!)

Check out these stats:

  • 100 per cent of Monthly Pass users are using Compass
  • 95 per cent of all other trips (Stored Value or other pass products) use Compass
  • Compass Cards have been tapped upwards of 400 million times since its launch

We are so happy that you, our riders, have embraced the change and switched over to tapping your way to seamless travel across Metro Vancouver whether it is on the bus, SeaBus, West Coast Express or SkyTrain.

To celebrate this amazing milestone, we want to thank you by having a super cool contest! You could be on of eight winners of $50 stored value!

How to enter (you can choose one or all entry modes!):

1. Tweet the following on Twitter (1 entry):

Celebrating 1 million @TransLink Compass Cards! Eight chances to win $50 of Stored Value & a transit prize pack! #Compass1million

2. Regram any of our contest photos on Instagram with the hashtag #Compass1million and tag @TransLinkBC. (1 entry)

3. Retweet any of our contest photos photo on Twitter with the hashtag #Compass1million and tag @TransLink. (1 entry)

4. Find us out on the system at SkyTrain stations this week and take a photo with our #Compass1million Instagram photo booth.

5. Share one of the TransLink social team’s #Compass1million photos on Facebook. (1 entry)

**Privacy settings for your #Compass1million posts
must be set to public to be entered**

The contest will run from Tuesday, July 19, 2016 to Sunday, July 25, 2016 at 11:59 p.m. PST. The winners will be chosen at random and notified within 48 hours of the contest closing.

Please read our official contest rules for more information.

Have questions about the contest? Ask away!
Comment below, email us or send us a tweet.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Children bring the feeling of home to Joyce–Collingwood Station

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Welcome home

Home. It’s a word we use all the time and a luxury we often take for granted.

When your home is destroyed and you are forced to leave, where does home become?

For nearly 1,700 government-assisted Syrian refugees arriving since November, B.C. has become their new home. Many of these refugees are part of families that have settled right here in Metro Vancouver with almost half of them living in Surrey.

When the construction hoarding needed to be put up at Joyce–Collingwood Station for upgrade work, a mural project was created to expand and strengthen the sense of community of our region and it turned out to be a great opportunity to include the children of these affected families!

The project was a partnership between TransLink, Collingwood Neighbourhood House and the City of Vancouver’s Mural Program.

The imagery throughout the mural was created by neighbourhood kids through lively and fun workshops of brainstorming, drawing and painting, then transferred to the overall design by the lead artists, Kim Villagante and Aly de la Cruz Yip.

It was the artists’ job to organize and arrange the variety of sketches and concepts they received during the workshops.

The concept of home, place and the natural environment were themes that came up a lot during their time with the kids, so the artists ran with that for the finalized piece.

It wasn’t just the youth involved who took something special away from this experience.

“In my experience as a community arts facilitator, I have walked away with memories of the conversations, discussions and the relationships that were built behind the scenes,” said Kim Villagante. “The symbol of the mural is powerful because it is a public and visual reminder on a wall of the community that exists behind it.”

Aly believes art can heal, support and nurture growth within communities and enjoys being a part of that process.

“Art is medicine. I have experienced firsthand the powerful role art can play in the processing of trauma and healing of communities,” said de la Cruz Yip. “I love being a grounding presence to youth; present, engaged and ready to step in with advice or encouragement whenever needed.”

You can look at some photos of the project below:

Be sure to see this wonderful, welcoming piece of community art in person outside the East stationhouse at Joyce–Collingwood Station.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Slight increase to Golden Ears Bridge tolls beginning July 15

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2016 toll adjustments begin July 15

Beginning on July 15, 2016, toll rates for the Golden Ears Bridge are increasing by five to 15 cents.

Tolls are used to pay for the building, operations and maintenance costs associated with Golden Ears Bridge.

Please note that there is no change to tolls for registered motorcycle customers.

2016 toll adjustments:

TRANSPONDER VIDEO PAY-AS-YOU-GO

CLASS

Now
After
07/15

Now
After
07/15

Now
After
07/15
Car $3.10 $3.15 $3.65 $3.70 $4.35 $4.40
Small truck $6.15 $6.25 $6.75 $6.85 $7.35 $7.45
Large Truck $9.20 $9.30 $9.85 $9.95 $10.40 $10.55
Motorcycle N/A N/A $1.50 $1.50 $2.85 $2.90

Remember!

Customers registered with a transponder from Quickpass or with a decal from TReO will get the best rate when crossing the Golden Ears Bridge.

You can read more about the bridge and tolling procedures by visiting our website.

Author: Jennifer Morland

Pokémon Go, transit and you!

Pidgeotto caught by @christ1990 on Canada Line

Pidgeotto caught by @christ1990 on Canada Line

“You’ll be okay. With your Pokémon, you’ll get things done whatever happens. I’m convinced of it!”
-Steven Stone

Pokémon Go is fun. Admit it, you’ve tried and you love it!

If you’ve missed this growing smartphone phenomenon, let me fill you in.Poke Ball

Pokémon Go is an augmented reality game you can play on your mobile device that uses geocaching to track, catch, train and battle different Pokémon characters – like the second evolution of Pidgey showcased in the photo above.

While we are all immersed in this “gotta’ catch’em all” mentality, it’s important to remember to play (and stay) safe!

Some tips for playing Pokémon Go on and around transit:

  • Eyes open to the real world around you! Streets, bus stops, sidewalks, cross walks, bus loops and, of course, SkyTrain station platforms, can all be dangerous places if you’re not paying attention to where you’re walking or standing.
  • Do not enter locations you wouldn’t normally. This game doesn’t give you a skeleton key to the region! Private or government buildings, residences and employee only areas are still off limits.
  • Don’t put yourself at risk! Keep your phone tucked away when you’re waiting for your bus or train. Your phone is a valuable commodity that thieves can snatch from your hand if you’re too distracted.
  • Play in teams and play during the day. Although it may be tempting to catch a Rattata at midnight at the park just down the street, do not go to secluded locations alone or at night.
  • Be aware. This game is not yet rolled out in Canada and could be vulnerable to hacks making fake Pokéstops to lure players, not Pokémon.

Follow these safety tips and enjoy this awesome game across the system and Metro Vancouver!

**INSIDER INFO** We’ve checked in with our resident Pokémon master and riding the bus can hatch your eggs from Pokéstops much faster!

Did you spot a Pokémon on transit? Tweet us or tag us on Instagram to let us know!

Author: Adrienne Coling

CMBC operator helps reunite missing children with families

Narednra Singh

Narendra began working for CMBC in 2015

Narendra Singh is a bus operator for CMBC. He joined the team in 2015 as a Community Shuttle operator and moved to conventional buses this past spring.

But to two different families, Narendra is more than a bus operator, he is a hero who located two missing children this past long weekend.

When a child in the area goes missing, operators receive messages via TMAC, the onboard computer screen. The messages include descriptions, last seen locations and any other information from police departments looking for the child.

On the first occasion, Narendra noticed a child standing by a bus stop sign alone as he was driving his route. The child looked distraught and matched the description of a missing boy Narendra had received just moments before. Narendra stopped the bus, let his passengers know why and had the child to get on board so he could verify if it was indeed the missing boy and alert the Vancouver Police Department (VPD).

“Hey,” I asked him, “Aren’t you supposed to be at home? Where’s your mom and dad? They must be worried.” The boy stated he got separated from his mom.

“I went back to my passengers and said ‘sorry folks, there’s another bus right behind me. I’ll be stationary and must wait for police.’  Most of the passengers understood a missing child was more important.”

VPD was on the scene in minutes and the boy was returned to his home. All of this only took about 90 minutes!

Narendra managed to save the day again two days later, except this time, he wasn’t even at work yet! Luckily he was wearing his uniform and safety vest to identify himself and he was able to wait with the child until police arrived to help the little lost girl find her way home.

For Narendra, he says it’s “Just a regular thing we (bus operators) do.”

Two children are back safe with their families because of the great communication between police services and CMBC, Narendra’s keen eye, quick thinking and kind heart.

We salute Narendra and everyone who help keep the children of our region safe.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Spot the Mark III – testing continues this weekend!

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So shiny and new!

Get ready transit fans because the Mark IIIs are almost here!!!

This weekend you may see them being tested in regular service on the Expo and Millennium Lines.

YES! It’s true!

You won’t be able to actually ride the one, four-car test train just yet and there will be STAs on the trains at the doors just to make sure no eager beavers jump on.

Why the testing?

Think of the trains as pilots. They have to complete a certain amount of hours in a variety of different service situations and testing scenarios before they are given the green light to be used in service.

We do this testing to ensure that the new trains are safe for all passengers and staff.

The third and final phase of testing allows actual SkyTrain passengers to ride the Mark IIIs when they are put into regular service.

Stay tuned for details on that exciting day!

What’s different about the Mark IIIs?

Let me tell you!

  • The cars are all connected – meaning you can walk from one end to the other and move about freely within the train.
  • These cars also have more room for standing passengers, wheelchairs, bikes, strollers and riders with luggage.
  • Seats are an inch lower, which helps people like me whose feet dangle on the Mark IIs!
  • They’re as quiet as a soft, summer’s breeze. OK, I’m taking some poetic license here but they are much quieter due to improved door seals.
  • These trains are green. No, not the colour. They are more energy efficient! They have improved LED lighting and longer lasting battery system – lasting 25 years compared to the 10 year life span in our existing fleet.

Want to spot the Mark III this weekend? Keep your eyes peeled across the system during these times:

  • Friday, July 8
    Millennium Line
    7 p.m. to 12 a.m.
  • Saturday, July 9
    Expo Line
    6 a.m. to 10 a.m.
    12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Snap a pic and share on Twitter and Instagram with the hashtag #SpottheMarkIII.

Want a sneak peak inside the trains? Check out the gallery below.

Author: Adrienne Coling

Update to the C9 route this September 5, 2016

The updated C9 route as of September 5, 2016

The updated C9 route as of September 5, 2016

 

New Westminster residents will see a slight change in their C9 community shuttle route starting September 5, 2016.

This shuttle currently runs on a temporary route, which primarily runs along Columbia Street as it travels between Lougheed Station and New Westminster Station. It makes one diversion along Richmond Street, turning into Jamieson Court before returning to Columbia Street.

On September 5th the C9 will turn off of Columbia Street and run along a portion Cumberland and Richmond Street, with stops at Richmond and Cumberland and on Richmond at Miner Street. Service on Jamieson Court will continue.

For a larger view, check the .pdf.

A sneak peek at the new Hamilton Transit Centre! (photos)

Check out the new buildings!

Check out the new buildings!

In order to move over 400,000 people on transit everyday in Metro Vancouver and prepare for a growing region, it’s important to keep Metro Vancouver buses organized, fueled up and safe. Today I’m proud to announce that our newest facility, the Hamiliton Transit Centre (HTC), is well on its way to completion!

The buildings

The new facility will perform three functions: bus dispatch, bus service (fuel and wash) and bus maintenance. Buses and bus operators servicing the Richmond, New Westminster, Burnaby and Vancouver areas will begin and complete service from this location.

Once completed, the 7.3 hectare site located in a light-industrial area in east Richmond will support the operations and maintenance of a fleet of 300 forty-foot equivalent (FFE) buses, including up to 80 Community Shuttle buses and 150 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fuelled buses. Sixty-foot buses will also be accommodated at the centre.

HTC features a maintenance building, service delivery building, waste water treatment building, bus washing building and fueling building.

Bus operators will receive their daily assignments in the service delivery building and collect their buses from the parking lanes. Buses due for overnight fueling and washing will be collected from the buildings and returned to the parking lane, while buses due for maintenance will be parked in bays south of the maintenance building. Because there will be CNG buses at HTC, the building requires different design considerations, including floors with radiant heat. The waste water treatment plant processes oily water and waste from the facility.

One thing that strikes you when looking at the buildings at HTC is the wood ceilings and roofs. Not only does the wood look great, the wood is salvaged pine beattle wood that will, along with other sustainable features, help us towards achieving a LEED Silver certification for HTC.

The HTC lighting design has also been developed to keep as much light as possible directed to the facility and not the surrounding residential sites.

A bit of history and details on HTC

TransLink and Coast Mountain Bus saw the need for a new facility and started planning for it in 2009. Construction began in 2013 with a final completion date in 2017.

HTC will increase the capacity for maintenance and storage to 2,005 FFE buses allowing room to grow our current fleet of 1,611 FFE.

What’s next?

Even though the centre won’t be completely finished until 2017, the plan is to have buses housed and running service out of the facility by the fall!

Have we piqued your interest about HTC? Well, we’ll be planning a livestream of the centre really soon. What do you think about that?

Author: Robert Willis

Links and Tidbits – July 7, 2016

Links and tidbits is our semi-regular roundup of interesting fodder about transportation from the last few weeks or so. If you have links to contribute, put them in the comments, or email us.

»   You think that ^^ this is heartbreak? Check out the video below!

»   D.C. subway turned water park. Yikes!

»   We can dance. We can go where we want to — including the subway. Meet the Showtime Kids aka We Live This!

»   Very meta bus ride there, Potter, very meta.

»   Creepy or forgivable transit behaviour? The staring, I cannot abide!

»   Farmers markets for commuters on the go (literally!) in Toronto. I want this!

»   Gotta catch’em all! Ash, is that you?

»   Some serious strap hanger heroes save the day.

»   Occasionally, bus drivers need some “emotional first-aid,” too.

»   A London subway experiment looks at escalators. What side do YOU stand on? (Fun fact, in Japan, each city could have different escalator etiquette. In Tokyo, you stand to the left but in Osaka, it’s the opposite)

»   Secrets of New York dishes the dirt on vintage NYC subway cars.

NYC-Ghostbusters-Service-Map-2

»   When there’s something strange in your neighbourhood. Who you gonna call?? I am loving this Ghostbusters inspired NYC subway map!

»   Another metro map redesign. This time for Paris. What do you think??

»   This bus driver’s love for her job is clear with her permanent and visual statement.

»   Body positive only in London’s transit ads thanks to the city’s major!

»   Brighton, U.K. is bus central with the highest number of bus trips per person outside of London.

»   This ^^Subway serenade gives new life to an oldie but a goody!

»   Usually, I’m not a fan of a full bus. But in this case, I’ll make an exception.

»   Office on the go! Tokyo installs quick-use desks and benches on platforms along the Ginza subway line. You know, for those moments when you just NEED to do some extra work.

»   Now I want to buy one of our Community Shuttles and adventure around like this guy!

»   Remember the mystery balloon artist on the NYC subway? He’s been found!

»   Helsinki gets the jump on everyone and fully integrates bike share into their transportation!

»   Remember that guy who stole subway trains not once, not twice but 30 times? He’s getting his own documentary!

»   Subway time can be more than that. Just take a look at these New Yorker cartoons!

»   Way to go, Croatia! We love our bus bike racks!

»   Well, we have self-driving trains. Are buses next?

»   Broadway and transit enthusiasts join together in this great new musical!

»   The newest transit/internet sensation – subway vent guy!

»   See what’s behind the sliding doors across the world.

»   A race to the beach! NYC subway vs an e-bike. Who will win? Watch and find out!

»   Ahhh!! Monsters on the subway!

Author: Adrienne Coling

CMBC attends provincially-led earthquake and tsunami response exercise

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Jon Arason, Emergency Management & Business Continuity Advisor and Stephen Shimek, Manager, Safety & Emergency Management

Always be prepared. It’s not just the boy scout’s motto!

Being prepared in an event of an emergency is important at home, at work AND on transit.

CMBC recently attended a response preparedness exercise put on by the province as to how this region could handle a larger earthquake and subsequent tsunami and how transit could help.

Living in the Pacific Northwest, we’ve often read that our beautiful province is at risk for a devastating earthquake followed by a tsunami. Given this knowledge, creating a professional disaster-response plan is not only important, but necessary.

Recognized as an organization that consistently ensures the safety and security of its staff and customers, CMBC recently took part in Exercise Coastal Response (June 7-10), the first-ever provincially-led earthquake and tsunami response exercise.

Based on a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami, the event included real-time simulation activities, focusing on what steps the province and its partners would take following such a catastrophic disturbance.

While in attendance at the South West Provincial Regional Emergency Operations Centre on day three of the event, CMBC’s Stephen Shimek (Manager, Safety & Emergency Management) and Jon Arason (Emergency Management & Business Continuity Advisor) shared important information with their colleagues.

“At the start of it,” said Shimek, “they didn’t realize what services we could provide. As we talked through it, they realized how much of an asset we are in any event like this, providing a multitude of different services, including bus shelters and transportation.”20160609_114725resize

“We became one of the partners in the exercise,” said Shimek, “having a critical role as an organization that can provide support during an earthquake event.”
The real value, according to both employees, was sharing essential information. “We needed to give them updated contact info for TransLink and the bus company,” said Arason, “as well as clarify what our role during a disaster would be.”

Not considered first responders, CMBC’s attendees emphasized what the organization is focused on. “We’re more than willing to help as a company,” said Arason, “we have a great track record of doing that, but we need to protect our staff, our riders, and we need to protect our assets.”

During one of the exercises, the organizers declared a provincial state of emergency, allowing them to provide further instructions to their partners, which include CMBC and TransLink. This prompted Arason, who referred to the post-disaster reality of fuel shortage and being short-staffed, to advise the province that the organization would need to manage itself first. “Once we know (we’re) safe, we’ll be rendering whatever assistance we can.”

Preparing for their own similar-type exercise this fall, Shimek and Arason agree there was an important takeaway from Exercise Coastal Response. “It reinforce(d) the fact that in order for us to support the city and the Lower Mainland, we have to be prepared ourselves, making sure that our own EOC (Emergency Operations Centre) is up and running and functional.”

Author: Kim Van Haren